Opening

60% The Maze Runner Sep 19
63% A Walk Among the Tombstones Sep 19
44% This Is Where I Leave You Sep 19
83% Tracks Sep 19
93% The Guest Sep 17

Top Box Office

11% No Good Deed $24.3M
71% Dolphin Tale 2 $15.9M
92% Guardians of the Galaxy $8.1M
19% Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $4.9M
20% Let's Be Cops $4.4M
88% The Drop $4.1M
37% If I Stay $3.9M
36% The November Man $2.8M
34% The Giver $2.6M
67% The Hundred-Foot Journey $2.4M

Coming Soon

68% The Equalizer Sep 26
71% The Boxtrolls Sep 26
86% The Two Faces of January Sep 26
—— Two Night Stand Sep 26
91% Jimi: All Is by My Side Sep 26

New Episodes Tonight

82% Girl Meets World: Season 1
87% The Knick: Season 1
50% Z Nation: Season 1

Discuss Last Night's Shows

100% Garfunkel and Oates: Season 1
—— Haven: Season 5
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
56% Married: Season 1
39% Rush: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
79% You're the Worst: Season 1

Certified Fresh TV

87% Boardwalk Empire: Season 5
86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
91% Doctor Who: Season 8
83% Extant: Season 1
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
87% The Knick: Season 1
89% Manhattan: Season 1
97% Masters of Sex: Season 2
90% Outlander: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
87% The Strain: Season 1
79% You're the Worst: Season 1

The Violin (El Violin) Reviews

Page 1 of 13
Fernando Rafael Q

Super Reviewer

June 14, 2007
This mexican film, winner at the 2005 CANNES Film Festival, "Un Certain Regard"- Best Actor: Angel Tavira, follows Plutarco (amazing actor Don Angel Tavira), his son Genaro (played by another great actor, Gerardo Taracena) and his grandson Lucio, who lead a double life, as musicians, and as supporters of the guerrilla movement against the government. When the army invades their town, the rebels decide to escape and leave the ammo behind, so, Plutarco, taking advantage of his "inoffensive violinist" looks, treats the captain to violin music everyday, so he can go to his corn field to pick up the ammo he has hidden days before. This low-budget independent movie was filmed in its entirety in black&white and features amazing and heartwrenching performances by Don Angel Tavira, Dagoberto Gama and Gerardo Taracena, it is directed by newcomer Francisco Vargas Quevedo, whose other work include a short film, that served as base for this one, also called "El Violin". Although it opened in 2005 and 2006 around the world, it didn't open until April 2007 in its country, Mexico, because no company wanted to release it and not one theater chain wanted to show it, because of its low-budget and beacuse it wouldn't appeal to larger audiences that seek blockbusters. Like its director, Francisco Vargas said, they know more of "El Violin (Le Violon)" in France, that they do in Mexico and that's sad... Guillermo del Toro approached the mexican senate and urged them to promote films like El Violin, but they've done nothing. Luckily, Cinepolis (LatinAmerica's biggest movie theater chain) picked it up and released it in limited theaters around the country, one of hose located in Tijuana, so yesterday i got the chance to see this marvelous mexican film and it was a wonderful, raw, real experience i'll never forget and i wish for all of you to see it.
Following the tradition of my friend Vince Flores, the best snack to watch this movie with is LifeSavers Gummies
Bye, and support mexican cinema!
Fernando :)
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

January 9, 2009
[font=Century Gothic]In "The Violin," Plutarco(Angel Tavira), his son Genaro(Gerardo Taracena), and his son Lucio(Mario Garibaldi) are a trio of troubadours traveling the country attempting to simultaneously supplant their meager income working the land and fund a revolution. For those keeping track, it is Plutarco on violin, Genaro on guitar and Lucio working the tip cup. On the return to their village, the men find a new round of fleeing in progress as the army is on the way. Gerardo runs off, fearing for the safety of his wife and worrying about something he may have left behind...[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]"The Violin" is a cliched movie with little context, replete with two-dimensional characters populating the landscape. It is a shame because there are some particularly good ideas that are just never developed that well, especially the relationship between Plutarco and the army captain(Dagoberto Gama). It is a nice touch that Plutarco creatively explains the peasants' struggle to his grandson as a fable but the villains of the tale turn out to be the ambitious.(Something lost in translation?) For the record, not all ambitious people are bad. What if you want to be the first person to walk on Mars? No harm in that. Or is that the peasants are good just because they are humble, a stereotype if ever there was one?[/font]
divinetrash
divinetrash

Super Reviewer

January 6, 2008
If the compelling story and the heartbreaking lead performance aren't enough reasons to see it, the photography alone, then, should be enough.
standbyfilms
May 15, 2008
Indiana Jones does not compare to the character study of the same topics explores in the Spielberg epic, yet done so quietly prefect here in a real Indiana Jones film called THE VIOLIN.

Life-or-death matters are handled with compelling gravity in Francisco Vargas' "The Violin," one of the most powerful movies screened at last year's Seattle International Film Festival.

this Mexican drama takes the peasants' side in dramatizing a 1970s revolt. The script vividly explores the impact of government oppression on three generations of one rebellious family.

Plutarco, perfectly played by 81-year-old Don Ángel Tavira, is never the frail grandfather he appears to be. Managing to play the violin even though his right hand is a stump, he just gets by as a traveling musician, using his practiced performer's charm to smother guards' suspicions and get past checkpoints. (Tavira deservedly won an acting award at the 2006 Cannes festival for this performance.)

After raiding an ammunition dump in a cornfield, Plutarco supplies his son, Genaro, with handfuls of bullets. Distraught by the news that his wife has been captured, Genaro and his son, Lucio, seem increasingly helpless in a situation that only the old man can effectively manipulate.

At first, even Plutarco seems to be getting nowhere. When he discovers a guard captain who loves music and wants to take violin lessons, the ice begins to break ? just enough to allow each man's humanity to become briefly evident. But as the uncompromising finale makes clear, this film is not any kind of heart warmer.

Although it begins with a graphic torture scene that suggests more of the same is coming, "The Violin" becomes increasingly restrained in its use of violence. First-time writer-director Vargas makes a point about brutality, then refuses to dwell on it. The most shattering moment is one character's silent reading of a list of casualties; his changing expressions tell us all we need to know.

Working in black-and-white with a gifted cinematographer, Martin Boege, Vargas creates a darkened fairy-tale atmosphere, especially as campfires light up the faces of the actors and smoke drifts photogenically through forests. Glimpses of village life suggest a timeless quality, especially when the grandfather recites a legend about the origins of war.

Don't leave before the final credits of "The Violin," which briefly goes dark, apparently for emphasis, before it really ends with an expressive coda. The blank moment throws in a touch of mystery. Most likely it's meant as a tribute to Tavira, without whom the movie would be unimaginable.

Move over Indiana Jone THE VIOLIN is the read thing - look for it on DVD ,

Vince UCB
Berkeley Ca Vmedia
EL CHIDO
June 6, 2014
Esta película es una película muy sencilla pero muy conmovedora y entretenida.
April 30, 2013
They are not real actors and that's why their looks are wonderful, they don't even need to speak because the look in their eyes tells all of the story, the story is in their eyes... Excelent film, wonderful story, shame that they can't be appreciate in their own country
September 5, 2012
Una historia triste pero que se siente en todo momento real. No queda mas que sentir empatía por los personajes, buenas actuaciones, historia bien contada, sin duda una excelente película
July 1, 2012
A film that shows us that dialogue can still be used effectively.
January 8, 2012
This is the third-best Spanish film I have ever seen. And what makes it worth while is the tension and the writing involved. There are moments in the film when you are tense to the point that you are worried about these characters and what they are going through. You know you have made an achievement in a career when you make an audience tense to the point of heavy-breathing and fear. Especially if you do so in the very first film that you direct. What adds on to the greatness of this film is the acting, because every actor in this film is incredible. Especially the actor of the main character, Plutarco. The acting only makes the film more believable.

What gives a feeling of tension within the film is the cinematography. For it being only in black-and-white, there are shots in the film that really do get you involved, combined with the great lighting. This is another interesting-as-hell film that is worth watching. But I don't want to recommend it to a certain audience. There are certain things that will either make you love it or hate it.
June 1, 2011
Easily, the best film I've seen all year! Such an amazing story that takes place without a specific time frame, It could happen today, tomorrow or 100 years ago! Truly masterful storytelling, amazing cinematography and masterful film making. It's one of those films I wouldn't change a single shot from. Absolutely beautiful, Art.
May 30, 2011
Excellent B&W photography. Some very good acting from Angel Tavira in the role of Plutarco Hidalgo. Outstanding debut for the director Francisco Vargas.
February 20, 2011
A Must see.....inspirational and well done....
January 14, 2011
Excellent, a very raw, real life movie. I know people all over the world have lived experiences like this and in my western industrialized little world, I can't even imagine what this might be like.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

January 9, 2009
[font=Century Gothic]In "The Violin," Plutarco(Angel Tavira), his son Genaro(Gerardo Taracena), and his son Lucio(Mario Garibaldi) are a trio of troubadours traveling the country attempting to simultaneously supplant their meager income working the land and fund a revolution. For those keeping track, it is Plutarco on violin, Genaro on guitar and Lucio working the tip cup. On the return to their village, the men find a new round of fleeing in progress as the army is on the way. Gerardo runs off, fearing for the safety of his wife and worrying about something he may have left behind...[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]"The Violin" is a cliched movie with little context, replete with two-dimensional characters populating the landscape. It is a shame because there are some particularly good ideas that are just never developed that well, especially the relationship between Plutarco and the army captain(Dagoberto Gama). It is a nice touch that Plutarco creatively explains the peasants' struggle to his grandson as a fable but the villains of the tale turn out to be the ambitious.(Something lost in translation?) For the record, not all ambitious people are bad. What if you want to be the first person to walk on Mars? No harm in that. Or is that the peasants are good just because they are humble, a stereotype if ever there was one?[/font]
Ivonne Koehler
July 28, 2008
This movie talks about what has been a reality inside the indian and rural towns in Mexico. It is a brave critique about the abuse of power and the confrontation between the native traditions and the institutional ones. Definetively you will fall in love with the main caracter!!!!. By the way, the movie is in made in black and white colors (with certain blue spots) so i guess is a kind of tribute to the mexican "costumbristas" filmography of the 1930s.
Page 1 of 13
Find us on:                     
Help | About | Jobs | Critics Submission | Press | API | Licensing | Mobile