Deep End (1971)

Deep End (1971)

Deep End




Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

Set at the fag-end of the '60s in a decidedly unglamorous and unswinging London (though actually filmed, very persuasively, in Hamburg), Skolimowski's pleasingly skewed variation on the coming-of-age sex comedy posits a bizarre, totally unsentimental education for its adolescent protagonist (Moulder-Brown), a somewhat na´ve school-leaver newly employed at a run-down swimming baths and obsessively pining for a colleague (Asher). Often very funny, and blessed with pounding Can numbers on the … More

Rating: R
Genre: Drama, Romance
Directed By:
Written By: Jerzy Gruza, Boleslaw Sulik, Jerzy Skolimowski
In Theaters:
On DVD: Jul 18, 2011
Paramount Pictures

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as Susan

as Swimming instructor

as Prostitute

as Lady client

as Baths cashier

as Nightclub receptioni...

as Baths manager

as Mike's Mother

as Mike's Father

as Hot Dog Girl

as Hot Dog Girl

as Stoker

as Cinema Manager

as Policeman

as Mike's Friend

as Hot Dog Stand Man

as Lady Client
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Critic Reviews for Deep End

All Critics (20) | Top Critics (7)

Skolimowski's Eastern Bloc-existentialist chops finally emerge in the last act, as the futility of looking for a diamond in the snow evolves into a sex-death underwater ballet.

Full Review… | December 13, 2011
Village Voice
Top Critic

Along with music from Can and Cat Stevens, a bizarre, beautiful ending is the high point of this wonderfully mysterious film.

Full Review… | May 3, 2011
Time Out
Top Critic

Full Review… | January 18, 2008
Time Out
Top Critic

Full Review… | July 7, 2007
Chicago Sun-Times
Top Critic

Full Review… | May 6, 2009
Top Critic

Full Review… | July 7, 2007
New York Times
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Deep End


This was a transcendent movie experience. Then, at the last second, Cat Stevens broke into the soundtrack and was able to kill the buzz of this movie that somehow combined the sensibilities of Godard and Truffaut ... once you sift out stuff you might see from Roeg and Lester. If Cat Stevens had sang the same song in the last 30 seconds of Taxi Driver, it would have been only slightly less appropriate. Otherwise, throughout the movie, there's a German rock group called "Can" playing a disturbingly modern but tonal score that pulses forward and wants to date the movie in the future, like 1980 -- a scary addition to a movie with two characters who are always rushing ahead of themselves. There is great handheld camerawork that stays warm and intimate with characters at high speeds. Highly recommended, but to avoid what for me was a major buzz kill, a friend has to illegally rip the movie from the blue-ray restored edition and use his/her computer to replace the Cat vocal at the end with some Can.

Adam Mahler

Super Reviewer

Skolimowski's theatre of the absurd, sharing a lot of style and approach with Polanski (both were partners in crime for "knife in water") has to be one of the most overlooked and brilliant rites of passage in British cinema.

The kind of film so great in its simplicity that makes you think how in hell you didn't come up with something like that for a start. As the main character, I also have a soft spot for ginger, delicate Jane Asher.

Pierluigi Puccini

Super Reviewer

Deep End is a practically unheard of film these days - but it's a surprisingly good one that urgently needs a bigger audience. The film is basically a coming of age story involving young love and teenage angst. Despite the fact that everything in this film has been seen before in other films, it all comes together well and doesn't feel like it's just rethreading old ground, which is very much to it's credit. Writer-director Jerzy Skolimowski does a really good job of telling his story too, which means that deep End is an easy film to get along with. The title refers to the film's central location - a swimming pool. We focus on Mike, a young lad fresh out of school who has just got his first job as a pool attendant at the local bath house. On his first day, he meets the beautiful Susan and falls head over heels in love with her. Trouble is, Susan already has a fiancÚ and while she kind of likes Mike, she doesn't take him seriously...leading Mike to become frustrated and willing to do anything in order to have Susan all for himself.

The two central performers are really good and responsible for a lot of the film's success. Jane Asher is absolutely beautiful and it's easy to see why she'd have a young lad lusting after her. Horror fans will likely recognise John Moulder-Brown from classic horror The House That Screamed, as well as Hammer Horror Vampire Circus. He's good here too, and expertly captures the immaturely and lust of youth. The film itself is always interesting and the director keeps the central relationship at the forefront of the film, which helps to keep things interesting. The film is set in 1970's London, and the director does a good job of capturing the gritty feel of the city. A lot of the film takes place inside a swimming baths, but sequences that take place in sleazy corners of the city are among the best of the film. The director does have an eye for sleaze too - some of the bath house punters are rather shady characters, and we've also got scenes set inside a prostitute's room and an adult movie theatre. The ending is iconic and memorable, and manages to tie up all the film's central themes. Overall, this really is a very good film that more people need to see!

Cassandra Maples

Super Reviewer

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