Les Amants (The Lovers) Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ July 6, 2010
Adultery and the bourgeoisie, the script is solid as are the performances but it's the awesome 'First Night' scene that really makes this film. While this is only Malle's second film, he is still experimenting with plot development and narrative but by now has established himself as a strong director visually, the lighting during the boat trip is just beautiful. Visually stunning and hugely influential, a young Charles Webb obviously took note!
Super Reviewer
April 18, 2008
jeanne moreau is intriguing to watch. fascinating exploration of the bourgeois and immensely bored. the plot was way ahead of its time -- interesting that this was filmed in the late 50's
Super Reviewer
July 28, 2014
Louis Malle's first feature is more conservative than the typical French New Wave classic, but it's an impressive, polished debut. The glaring problem is that the first half is far more interesting than the second. We're introduced to Jeanne (Jeanne Moreau, back when she could still pass for "girlish"), a bored, neglected wife married to a wealthy newspaper publisher. She escapes her joyless life with steady trips to Paris, where she sees her socialite friend Maggy and a polo-playing paramour. The subtle tensions between these characters are engrossing, but the film sinks once Jeanne meets another man and the story turns into a gooey, dreamy-eyed romance based on no obvious chemistry or motive. "The Lovers" was quite controversial in its day, due to a late sex scene where Moreau's expression of ecstasy suggests some intimate stimulation below. Oh, and there are a few flashes of nipple too. But it's all very tame by contemporary standards.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ January 20, 2008
[font=Century Gothic]"The Lovers" starts with Jeanne(Jeanne Moreau) and Maggy(Judith Magre), best friends since childhood, watching a polo match in Paris featuring Raoul Flores(Jose Villalonga), a star player. When Maggy moved to Paris, Jeanne stayed behind in Dijon and married a newspaper publisher, Henri(Alain Cuny), and gave birth to a daughter, Catherine(Patricia Maurin). While a loving husband, Henri is also inattentive to her needs, spending most of his time at the newspaper. He encourages her visits to Paris which lead to Jeanne's attraction to Raoul.[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]Directed by Louis Malle, "The Lovers" is a stunning and lovingly photographed movie with an absolutely fantastic ending. Throughout, there is a running conflict between the past, present and a possible future, all running together. The Paris that Maggy knows is not the one I dream of high culture, but rather of style, fashion and impermanence compared to the provinces where nothing much ever changes. And even though Jeanne wants for nothing, there is still something missing from her life which might possibly be found in Paris.[/font]
Super Reviewer
July 29, 2009
Aesthetically speaking, this is a truly beautiful piece, and Louis Malle does wonders with that aspect alone. On top of being a photographic triumph, the movie makes a lot of bold decisions in terms of sexual depictions, especially in regards to adultery. It's a very sensual experience, and is quite influential in a lot of ways. All that being said, the shallowness of the protagonist is a bit wearisome and a lot of the character's actions seem to work in favor of brisk plot development rather than realistic human tendencies. The movie sums itself up too quickly for the amount of material crammed in, and it does a lot of damage to how well transitions play out. Worth a look for its achievements.
May 29, 2013
A bored housewife seeks the excitement she craves from her socialite friends, especially her lover Raoul. At her husband's request, they are invited to their own country house. That day, however, she meets a third man. While everything here is purposely chic and looks swell, the film really only comes alive with the last very romantic thirty minutes.
January 10, 2013
Top notch drama, beautifully shot.
½ March 11, 2012
Impressionante análise dos conflitos interiores vividos por uma mulher indecisa entre a vida estável de casada e a liberdade do amor adúltero. Aquilo que começa por ser um drama quase pendular, vivido entre a província e Paris, ganha a certa altura a dimensão de intriga matrimonial num espaço incomodamente circunscrito e não se fica por aí. Jeanne Moreau, al (C)m de ser linda e perfeitamente afeiçoada ao que uma câmara quer, (C) capaz de uma caracterização que diz mil palavras com a simples posição da cabeça ou o modo como as mãos ajeitam o cabelo. The Lovers? (C) ponderado e morno apenas porque quer e para que as suas melhores surpresas tenham o efeito desejado. Sabe-se que as suas cenas de amor eram demasiado ousadas para o ano de 1958 e a verdade (C) que ainda hoje são um abalo sem nada de muito gráfico. Não me admirava nada que estivesse por aqui o antecedente mais decisivo para tudo que vimos muitos anos depois em Eu sou o amor?. A Tilda Swinton que me perdoe, mas The Lovers? abafa Eu sou o amor? nem que seja porque chegou à fórmula muito muito antes.
½ September 15, 2011
More noteworthy historically than for the actual movie
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ January 20, 2008
[font=Century Gothic]"The Lovers" starts with Jeanne(Jeanne Moreau) and Maggy(Judith Magre), best friends since childhood, watching a polo match in Paris featuring Raoul Flores(Jose Villalonga), a star player. When Maggy moved to Paris, Jeanne stayed behind in Dijon and married a newspaper publisher, Henri(Alain Cuny), and gave birth to a daughter, Catherine(Patricia Maurin). While a loving husband, Henri is also inattentive to her needs, spending most of his time at the newspaper. He encourages her visits to Paris which lead to Jeanne's attraction to Raoul.[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]Directed by Louis Malle, "The Lovers" is a stunning and lovingly photographed movie with an absolutely fantastic ending. Throughout, there is a running conflict between the past, present and a possible future, all running together. The Paris that Maggy knows is not the one I dream of high culture, but rather of style, fashion and impermanence compared to the provinces where nothing much ever changes. And even though Jeanne wants for nothing, there is still something missing from her life which might possibly be found in Paris.[/font]
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