Conspiracy Reviews

Page 1 of 14
Daniel Mumby
Super Reviewer
September 27, 2013
A lot has been written recently about the resurgence of TV drama, and how the most interesting stories and ideas are now being presented on the small screen rather than in the cinema. This is of course a big generalisation - there are still a great many brilliant films being made each year with interesting stories, just as so much of mainstream TV is utter trash. But Conspiracy is a good example of how TV movies have grown in stature and presentation, tackling a meaty subject with aplomb and boasting very high production values.

I've spoken a fair bit in the past about how we should not look down on TV movies. Some stories are more suited to the big screen or small screen depending on their scope, a matter I discussed in detail in my negative review of The Rutles: All You Need is Cash. I've similarly spoken about how biopics work best when they focus on one event as a microcosm from which wider themes can be borne out - a point I discussed in my recent review of Nixon.

From these perspectives, Conspiracy is a triumph on both counts. It has very clear intentions about its subject matter, being both conscious of and content with the limitations afforded by its given medium. Its story is ideally suited to television, being completely self-contained but hinting at wider events and ideas, leaving the viewer wanting more even with a confident, clinical ending. While TV movies once had a reputation for being sub-par and riddled with short-cuts, this has been laboured over to the last detail.

The film is certainly mounted very handsomely, capturing the period setting of the Wannsee Conference with the same level of detail presented in either Band of Brothers or Valkyrie. But whereas Bryan Singer's film couldn't decide whether it was a talkie drama or an action film with talking in it, this presents itself as a talkie drama from the first to last moments. The camerawork is solid and efficient, being reminiscent of the dinner party scenes in Gosford Park (but lacking Robert Altman's cinematic polish in the close-ups).

When The Reader was attracting Oscar attention back in 2008, Mark Kermode raised the issue of accents in films. He argued that, considering the international, global nature of cinema, having actors speak English in a foreign accent was more distracting and less convincing than said actor learning the language of their character, or casting a native speaker of said language in the first place. We're all familiar with how easily the German accent can be caricatured, and how its comic potential can often turn a serious portrayal into something unintentionally silly.

Conspiracy is interesting in this regard in having a largely British cast, all playing Germans, speaking in their own English accents (or American, in the case of Stanley Tucci). Aside from odd words of German - mainly "Heil Hitler!" in the introductions - English is spoken throughout, and while all the characters are broadly well-spoken there is no attempt made to conform to a particular accent as standard, be it RP or anything else.

There are several conclusions we can draw from this creative decision. One possible reason for it is that the BBC and HBO are being cynical, believing that English-speaking audiences are too lazy to read subtitles and that the film would stand a better chance if everyone was speaking 'normally'; with so many famous faces on screen, cod German accents would be a distraction. The film does, perhaps unintentionally, fall into the Hollywood cliché of casting British actors as villains (with the exception of Tucci who, notwithstanding his ability, may have been cast to appease American audiences).

Another, gentler possibility is that director Frank Pierson is making a point that the characters wouldn't be conscious of each other's accents: they are all speaking German, but we are hearing it in English as a dramatic device, and what is important is what is said, not in what language it is delivered. Whatever the intentions or implications of this device, it does work in making the drama flow, and it is not a problem which undermines the drama in the moment. As much as we may ponder the creative intentions behind it, this pondering does not distract us from the matter in hand.

In terms of its political or historical position, Conspiracy is very much a product of revisionist history. We are meant to find the actions of Heydrich and his colleagues chilling, but what is more chilling is how calmly and clinically they deal with these matters, treating millions of lives like statistics and very rarely becoming emotional. In this regard the film clearly draws on two revisionist sources: Hannah Arendt's The Banality of Evil, written during the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem, and Stanley Milgram, whose experiments in the 1960s showed how power can supersede morality. Both Arendt and Milgram believed that high-powered Nazis like Heydrich and Eichmann were just "bureaucrats shuffling papers", whose compulsion to obey their Führer overrode any kind of moral principles.

Whether you believe Arendt and Milgram's scholarship or not, Conspiracy does set out a compelling and chilling argument about how the Final Solution came about. It depicts the Wannsee Conference in clinical detail, arguing that the extermination of the Jews was motivated as much by short-term political concerns as it was by any long-standing anti-Semitic ideology. The Conference is like a government Cabinet meeting to decide the budget; every department is fighting over their piece of the pie, arguing why their projects are deserving of money and manpower. When the various solutions are discussed (sterilisation, deportation, gas chambers etc.) they are assessed in terms of efficiency rather than morality.

The title of the film relates to a number of different conspiracies occurring within the film, most of which come to fruition. There is the conspiracy of the Holocaust itself, which is being organised behind closed doors with no trace of evidence remaining (save the one copy of the transcript on which the film is based). There is Heydrich's personal conspiracy to bring the different wings of the Reich government in line with his ideas. He arrives at Wannsee with the solution already in mind and under construction, and slowly twists everyone round to his way of thinking.

Then there is the related conspiracy of the SS to run roughshod over the other government agencies. They use Germany's faltering fortunes in Russia to assert control, arguing that only the military can effectively deal with the Jewish crisis. There are also minor conspiracies, which are referred either in then narration or by the characters: the Czech plot to assassinate Heydrich, the conflict between Bohrmann and Goering, and the rumours of Heydrich's Jewish ancestors. In every case we get a picture of a government which is clinical in execution but fractious in construction; it epitomises Hitler's tactic of playing departments off against each other, giving out contradicting orders to consolidate his personal power (and, by extension, those closest to him - whoever they may be).

Conspiracy is anchored in the brilliant central performance of Kenneth Branagh, who inhabits Reinhard Heydrich to a scary degree. He takes us in with how friendly and jovial he seems, but just beneath the surface lies a clever man, deeply manipulative and ice cold. He ignores all input that is contrary to his aims, flatters to deceive, and has a clear idea of what he wants before he has even allowed his colleagues to speak.

The cast around Branagh are just as impressive. Colin Firth is very good as Dr. Stuckart, co-creator of the Nuremberg Laws; he gets a great speech around halfway through, defending the rule of law with a rigour and passion reminiscent of Sir Thomas More in A Man For All Seasons. David Threlfall is completely unrecognisable from his later work in Shameless, turning in a restrained but imposing turn as Dr. Kritzinger. Stanley Tucci doesn't make a huge impression as Eichmann, but that is perhaps in keep with the character's status as a bureaucrat and organiser, rather than a leader.

There are a number of small problems which hobble Conspiracy. Despite its lavish production values, it is a little stagey; Pierson's camera movements don't always prevent the meeting room from feeling restrictive, and the dialogue scenes outside of it are informative but symptomatic of the belief that more locations means greater drama. The opening section before Heydrich arrives is a little clumsy, consisting largely of exposition which is rendered unnecessary by the introductions at the start of the meeting. And the narration at either end is just as unnecessary: the film gains no weight or tension from it, and its content could have been conveyed just as well in title cards alone.

Conspiracy is an impressive and highly watchable drama which makes a very good fist of a difficult subject matter. The story is told efficiently and intelligently with strong attention to detail, supported by good performances and subtle visuals. Debates about its political views or its creative choices regarding accents will continue, but as a piece of dramatic storytelling it is a good reminder of the power and scope of television.
Super Reviewer
May 20, 2013
Shocking. Subtle. Monstrous. Beyond belief. Powerful story. Powerful performances. If you miss this story, something is WRONG with you.
TheDudeLebowski65
Super Reviewer
June 9, 2010
This movie is a chilling account of the meeting that occured on January 20th 1942 to discuss the final solution of the Jewish question. It's a haunting film to watch, and I have to say, a very important one to watch. One of the main reasons this film is so chilling to watch is that we see men talking openly about how to commit mass murder without any signs of remorse. The film chronicles the top secret meeting at Wannsee of top Nazi officials to discuss a means for Hitler's final answer to the Jewish question. What followed in the next hour of the meeting was a polite meeting with little debate and an evil intent. Conspiracy is a chilling account of that meeting. The film is a must watch for history buffs, and is sometimes hard to watch, but it is a very important film to watch. The cast involved do a phenomenal job at portraying these men of the third Reich who discussed and planned the mass murder of over Six million Jews. Kenneth Branagh portrays General Renhard Heydrich, second command of the SS and Stanley Tucci as Colonel Adolf Eichmann. Both actors portray these men as they were, evil. Both actors have no sense of remorse, and they feel cold blooded on screen, which they are able to pull off because they're incredibly talented actors. In the film they discuss of means of extermination, primitive to start, and even more elaborate by the end of the meeting. By the meetings close, they've decided that they will be gassing Jews in specially built shower rooms. Conspiracy is a powerful historical account of one of the greatest crimes ever devised. If you want to watch a film that goes deeper into the planning of this horrible crime, then give this one a view. This is a definite must see film for historical buffs, and could be maybe considered as necessary viewing material in history class. The film overall is a solid drama and with terrific acting, and a great script, this is a film that sheds a lot more light on the planning of the Holocaust. This film is based on the only surviving document of the January 20th 1942 meeting where 15 Nazi officials planned the unthinkable. A hard, but necessary film to watch.
Super Reviewer
½ June 12, 2010
*Based* on the only surviving copy of the Wannsee Conference minutes, this movie displays the meeting set up to come to an unanimous agreement by all those summoned, even if it (the agreement) came with somewhat hesitation, to one of the most horrifying decisions to be ever made in the history of mankind.

Incredibly great performances (some may argue that there's hardly any room for performance, but I'm talking about the expressions here) prevented it from making it a boring fare for me. The screenplay was exceptionally well done because this isn't some thriller/suspense flick that keeps you guessing. You know the outcome beforehand here, yet it manages to keep you hooked in. While it wasn't entertaining, it was surely engaging. And this comes from someone who is into entertainment stuff in general when it comes to movies.

Finally, if a movie set in one location & comprising only of discussions & arguments for most of the part isn't your idea of a movie (or say, your cup of tea), I'd rather you give this one a pass.
Super Reviewer
August 2, 2012
If there is something notable about the film (outside of the subtle performance and tight screenplay) its that the filmmakers rightly recognize some of the most awful decisions ever made in the history of the human race were formulated in quite rooms by men that were able to coolly rationalize just about any action. Not a single moment is overplayed by the director or the actors, which makes every scene absolutely terrifying.
SteveStrange
Super Reviewer
May 2, 2009
A superb and objective historical account.
hawkledge
Super Reviewer
November 26, 2008
Outstanding and important historical drama tracing the meeting of Hitler's right-hand men in January of 1942 in Wannsee, Berlin, which laid the practical groundwork for the "Final Solution.". Kenneth Branagh and Stanley Tucci lead a great cast.
DrLappos
Super Reviewer
½ October 17, 2008
Absolutely brilliant. Branagh gives a great performance as they discuss the 'Jewish proble.' Chilling and unmissable.
January 6, 2013
Excellent dramatization of the Wannsee Conference. You might recoil more than once at the matter-of-factly cruelty, but I have no doubt that this is how they "solved the Jewish problem," over pastries and a cup of tea, talking about humans as if discussing how to get rid of rats. People usually only focus on Hitler as the mastermind and the supreme devil, we tend to forget about the monsters behind him. Hats off to these magnificent actors, especially Branagh as Heydrich and Tucci as Eichmann, the so called architect of the Holocaust. Great movie.
November 7, 2009
I own this one! If you realy like history and dont mind the hole movie shot in one room, youll love it 2!
July 22, 2007
A film that depicts the stronghold that power wields. Film runs somewhere between documentary and movie. Even so you will watch and find yourself breathing shallowly. The interviews in the features section is also worth a viewing.
½ January 8, 2015
Fascinating Movie about the meeting of Nazis with regard to the so called Final Solution. Well acted, but chilling and disturbing due to the Subject.
½ May 21, 2014
In the dead of Winter 1942, amidst the fury of WWII, at a Nazi commandeered estate beside the serene Lake Wannsee outside Berlin, 14 top Nazi and SS officials convene a meeting which is to last 85 minutes. "Conspiracy" is a drama which reenacts the meeting during which the extermination of 11 million Jews is mapped out with chilling candor. In spite of the obvious absence of the guttural German language, the film is an excellent production overall and well worth watching for those with an interest in "The Holocaust" or WWII history.
½ May 2, 2014
The film just jolts you.Blunt,brutal and unflinching in the shear disregard for human life.Great performances abound as this kick to the head moves foward,hard to watch but brilliant also.
April 18, 2014
Not a bad movie, just not a great movie. Mostly it's calm and fairly even paced. It becomes easy to tune out at times the same way I do when I'm in meetings at work! I guess that means they captured the meeting feel fairly well.
Daniel Mumby
Super Reviewer
September 27, 2013
A lot has been written recently about the resurgence of TV drama, and how the most interesting stories and ideas are now being presented on the small screen rather than in the cinema. This is of course a big generalisation - there are still a great many brilliant films being made each year with interesting stories, just as so much of mainstream TV is utter trash. But Conspiracy is a good example of how TV movies have grown in stature and presentation, tackling a meaty subject with aplomb and boasting very high production values.

I've spoken a fair bit in the past about how we should not look down on TV movies. Some stories are more suited to the big screen or small screen depending on their scope, a matter I discussed in detail in my negative review of The Rutles: All You Need is Cash. I've similarly spoken about how biopics work best when they focus on one event as a microcosm from which wider themes can be borne out - a point I discussed in my recent review of Nixon.

From these perspectives, Conspiracy is a triumph on both counts. It has very clear intentions about its subject matter, being both conscious of and content with the limitations afforded by its given medium. Its story is ideally suited to television, being completely self-contained but hinting at wider events and ideas, leaving the viewer wanting more even with a confident, clinical ending. While TV movies once had a reputation for being sub-par and riddled with short-cuts, this has been laboured over to the last detail.

The film is certainly mounted very handsomely, capturing the period setting of the Wannsee Conference with the same level of detail presented in either Band of Brothers or Valkyrie. But whereas Bryan Singer's film couldn't decide whether it was a talkie drama or an action film with talking in it, this presents itself as a talkie drama from the first to last moments. The camerawork is solid and efficient, being reminiscent of the dinner party scenes in Gosford Park (but lacking Robert Altman's cinematic polish in the close-ups).

When The Reader was attracting Oscar attention back in 2008, Mark Kermode raised the issue of accents in films. He argued that, considering the international, global nature of cinema, having actors speak English in a foreign accent was more distracting and less convincing than said actor learning the language of their character, or casting a native speaker of said language in the first place. We're all familiar with how easily the German accent can be caricatured, and how its comic potential can often turn a serious portrayal into something unintentionally silly.

Conspiracy is interesting in this regard in having a largely British cast, all playing Germans, speaking in their own English accents (or American, in the case of Stanley Tucci). Aside from odd words of German - mainly "Heil Hitler!" in the introductions - English is spoken throughout, and while all the characters are broadly well-spoken there is no attempt made to conform to a particular accent as standard, be it RP or anything else.

There are several conclusions we can draw from this creative decision. One possible reason for it is that the BBC and HBO are being cynical, believing that English-speaking audiences are too lazy to read subtitles and that the film would stand a better chance if everyone was speaking 'normally'; with so many famous faces on screen, cod German accents would be a distraction. The film does, perhaps unintentionally, fall into the Hollywood cliché of casting British actors as villains (with the exception of Tucci who, notwithstanding his ability, may have been cast to appease American audiences).

Another, gentler possibility is that director Frank Pierson is making a point that the characters wouldn't be conscious of each other's accents: they are all speaking German, but we are hearing it in English as a dramatic device, and what is important is what is said, not in what language it is delivered. Whatever the intentions or implications of this device, it does work in making the drama flow, and it is not a problem which undermines the drama in the moment. As much as we may ponder the creative intentions behind it, this pondering does not distract us from the matter in hand.

In terms of its political or historical position, Conspiracy is very much a product of revisionist history. We are meant to find the actions of Heydrich and his colleagues chilling, but what is more chilling is how calmly and clinically they deal with these matters, treating millions of lives like statistics and very rarely becoming emotional. In this regard the film clearly draws on two revisionist sources: Hannah Arendt's The Banality of Evil, written during the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem, and Stanley Milgram, whose experiments in the 1960s showed how power can supersede morality. Both Arendt and Milgram believed that high-powered Nazis like Heydrich and Eichmann were just "bureaucrats shuffling papers", whose compulsion to obey their Führer overrode any kind of moral principles.

Whether you believe Arendt and Milgram's scholarship or not, Conspiracy does set out a compelling and chilling argument about how the Final Solution came about. It depicts the Wannsee Conference in clinical detail, arguing that the extermination of the Jews was motivated as much by short-term political concerns as it was by any long-standing anti-Semitic ideology. The Conference is like a government Cabinet meeting to decide the budget; every department is fighting over their piece of the pie, arguing why their projects are deserving of money and manpower. When the various solutions are discussed (sterilisation, deportation, gas chambers etc.) they are assessed in terms of efficiency rather than morality.

The title of the film relates to a number of different conspiracies occurring within the film, most of which come to fruition. There is the conspiracy of the Holocaust itself, which is being organised behind closed doors with no trace of evidence remaining (save the one copy of the transcript on which the film is based). There is Heydrich's personal conspiracy to bring the different wings of the Reich government in line with his ideas. He arrives at Wannsee with the solution already in mind and under construction, and slowly twists everyone round to his way of thinking.

Then there is the related conspiracy of the SS to run roughshod over the other government agencies. They use Germany's faltering fortunes in Russia to assert control, arguing that only the military can effectively deal with the Jewish crisis. There are also minor conspiracies, which are referred either in then narration or by the characters: the Czech plot to assassinate Heydrich, the conflict between Bohrmann and Goering, and the rumours of Heydrich's Jewish ancestors. In every case we get a picture of a government which is clinical in execution but fractious in construction; it epitomises Hitler's tactic of playing departments off against each other, giving out contradicting orders to consolidate his personal power (and, by extension, those closest to him - whoever they may be).

Conspiracy is anchored in the brilliant central performance of Kenneth Branagh, who inhabits Reinhard Heydrich to a scary degree. He takes us in with how friendly and jovial he seems, but just beneath the surface lies a clever man, deeply manipulative and ice cold. He ignores all input that is contrary to his aims, flatters to deceive, and has a clear idea of what he wants before he has even allowed his colleagues to speak.

The cast around Branagh are just as impressive. Colin Firth is very good as Dr. Stuckart, co-creator of the Nuremberg Laws; he gets a great speech around halfway through, defending the rule of law with a rigour and passion reminiscent of Sir Thomas More in A Man For All Seasons. David Threlfall is completely unrecognisable from his later work in Shameless, turning in a restrained but imposing turn as Dr. Kritzinger. Stanley Tucci doesn't make a huge impression as Eichmann, but that is perhaps in keep with the character's status as a bureaucrat and organiser, rather than a leader.

There are a number of small problems which hobble Conspiracy. Despite its lavish production values, it is a little stagey; Pierson's camera movements don't always prevent the meeting room from feeling restrictive, and the dialogue scenes outside of it are informative but symptomatic of the belief that more locations means greater drama. The opening section before Heydrich arrives is a little clumsy, consisting largely of exposition which is rendered unnecessary by the introductions at the start of the meeting. And the narration at either end is just as unnecessary: the film gains no weight or tension from it, and its content could have been conveyed just as well in title cards alone.

Conspiracy is an impressive and highly watchable drama which makes a very good fist of a difficult subject matter. The story is told efficiently and intelligently with strong attention to detail, supported by good performances and subtle visuals. Debates about its political views or its creative choices regarding accents will continue, but as a piece of dramatic storytelling it is a good reminder of the power and scope of television.
Super Reviewer
May 20, 2013
Shocking. Subtle. Monstrous. Beyond belief. Powerful story. Powerful performances. If you miss this story, something is WRONG with you.
June 16, 2013
One of the great movies of our time....outstanding acting by top class actors and a first class script...everything is perfect in this...deserves more attention and viewing.
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