Gillian Jacobs' Five Favorite Films

The Walk of Shame and Community star chats about her new film, partying sober, and Darkwing Duck.

When Gillian Jacobs won the role of Britta Perry, the rebellious activist and armchair psychologist of the Greendale gang on NBC's Community, the world had yet to see what comic potential she possessed. Until then, Jacobs had primarily taken darker roles in films like Choke and The Box. But she positively sparkled alongside a talented cast that included Joel McHale, Chevy Chase, and Ken Jeong, and it's paved the way for further comedy roles.

Next up for Jacobs is Walk of Shame, which opens this week and stars Elizabeth Banks as Meghan Miles, a TV news anchor who finds herself stranded in the wrong part of town after a night of partying. RT spoke with Jacobs about her role as Meghan's BFF Rose, working with comedy vets, and what it's like to party "stone cold sober." But first, here are Gillian Jacobs' Five Favorite Films:


American Movie (Chris Smith, 1999; 94% Tomatometer)

You know, a movie that I always come back to, which is a documentary -- I hope that's okay -- is American Movie, which I think is one of the funniest and saddest movies I've ever seen. So quotable. And it really says a lot about hope, optimism, naivete, the movie business. Even though they're hundreds of miles away from LA and have no real access to Hollywood... I just love that movie so much.




Fanny & Alexander (Ingmar Bergman, 1982; 100% Tomatometer)

A movie that I've seen probably the most is Fanny & Alexander, the Ingmar Bergman movie. I even dragged my friends to the super long version that had an intermission. I don't know how much they liked me that day.




The Philadelphia Story (George Cukor, 1940; 100% Tomatometer)

Well, I was a super fan of Katharine Hepburn as a kid, so let's say The Philadelphia Story. I also really loved Cary Grant as a kid, so you could do a subset of, like, His Girl Friday; you know, Rosalind Russell, Cary Grant, incredible movie. The dialogue is just mindblowing. The pace at which they manage to speak, I find to be incredible.

Was it someone in your family who introduced you to these classic films?

I think maybe my mom thought that Katharine Hepburn would be a good role model of like a strong, smart, independent woman. Maybe she steered me in that direction. You know, because she was really so ahead of her time. Like, she bought the rights to the play of The Philadelphia Story and made that movie when she was considered box office poison and no one wanted to hire her. I think she was pretty amazing in terms of how she controlled her career and gave herself second chances when people totally counted her out. So it might have been my mom leading me in that direction, but I really responded to her as a kid, and watched Bringing up Baby and Holiday and all of those movies.




The Raid (Gareth Evans, 2012; 85% Tomatometer)

Okay, let's go for a more recent movie. How about that? You know what movie I loved recently? The Raid, to go in a completely opposite direction. I really enjoyed that movie. That was so fun to watch in the theater. That's one of those movies where like, it's so cool to sit there and watch it on the big screen.

Are you a big action fan?

I really enjoy them. I have a hard time watching people getting punched on screen; I have to close my eyes a lot. But somehow, maybe just the sheer number of punchings overwhelmed me and I was okay.




A Fish Called Wanda (Charles Crichton and John Cleese, 1988; 93% Tomatometer)

Okay, let's do something completely different. Here's a movie I was watching the other day on cable that I loved as a kid and it still made me laugh: A Fish Called Wanda. It's still funny.



Next, Jacobs talks about Walk of Shame, working with comedy vets, the future of Community, and how she feels about six-pack abs.

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