24 City (Er shi si cheng ji) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

24 City (Er shi si cheng ji) Reviews

Page 1 of 3
Donald J. Levit
ReelTalk Movie Reviews
February 11, 2016
A fond, quietly ironic look at the past and the present facing the global problem of individual obsolescence and urban uprooting.
Dan Fainaru
Screen International
August 4, 2015
Jia purposely refrains from voicing any opinions here and its authenticity may be arguable, but if pure fiction is so often taken as historical testimony, why shouldn't half-fiction qualify for the same honours?
Michael Joshua Rowin
Stop Smiling
August 2, 2015
Jia Zhangke seems to be entering a new phase of his fascinating career with 24 City, a documentary/fiction hybrid that reworks the director's signature techniques and strategies to stunning and self-critical effect.
Tony Rayns
Sight and Sound
June 18, 2012
24 City belies its documentary origins with overtly poetic film language: the film is an elegiac visual symphony of carefully framed compositions, trompe l'oeil camera movements, posed portraits, internal rhymes and mysterious vignettes.
Top Critic
Liam Lacey
Globe and Mail
September 14, 2010
A blend of documentary and drama which is by turns movingly authentic and deliberately artificial.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Peter Keough
Boston Phoenix
July 6, 2010
A familiar scenario both here and in China, but Jia Zhang-ke has shaped it into a complex and lucid cinematic poem about identity, transience, and loss.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
July 6, 2010
24 City includes evocative footage of Factory 420's dismantling, but emphasizes people over place.
Top Critic
Maggie Lee
Hollywood Reporter
July 6, 2010
In [Jia Zhangke's] chronicle of the changing fortunes of a defunct but once glorious aeronautic factory and its workers through talking heads and wordless images exclusively, the documentary strain prevails to simple, yet emotionally reverberating effect.
Top Critic
Derek Elley
Variety
July 6, 2010
Strongest moments are when the pristine HD lensing by Hong Kong's Yu Lik-wai (a Jia regular) and Wang Yu, and warm string music by Yoshihiro Hanno, take over in montages showing the gradual dismantling of the factory.
Derek Malcolm
This is London
May 6, 2010
Zhangke never hints much about politics ... His is more the story of ordinary people caught up in history and still determined to live their lives as well as they can. It's both relevant and resonant.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Nigel Andrews
Financial Times
May 6, 2010
History weaves in and out of faces that purl their monologues -- real or scripted -- as Jia presents the past as a giant, invisible river.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Rich Cline
Shadows on the Wall
May 6, 2010
An intriguing hybrid of fiction and documentary, this film chronicles the dismantling of a notorious factory in Chengdu to make way for a new luxury community. It's skilfully assembled, but a bit dry for Western audiences.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Carmen Grey
Total Film
May 6, 2010
Punctuated with eyebrow-raising poems about aeronautics factories, its treacle-paced obliqueness will frustrate some viewers. But the pay-off's a layered, haunting portrait of China in its shift to a capitalist economy.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Peter Bradshaw
Guardian
April 30, 2010
A deeply serious and sombre film, trying to find a way of telling the stories of people affected by the gigantic political and economic changes sweeping that country whose concerns must in the end affect us all: 21st-century China.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Matt Bochenski
Little White Lies
April 30, 2010
Enthralling, beguiling and haunting.
| Original Score: 4/5
Top Critic
Dave Calhoun
Time Out
April 29, 2010
The film takes on an operatic feel, moving between euphoria for the new and lament for the lost.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Dennis Schwartz
Ozus' World Movie Reviews
January 24, 2010
Reflective historical documentary on ordinary Chinese workers.
Full Review | Original Score: B+
Top Critic
Wesley Morris
Boston Globe
August 20, 2009
The director has an exquisite eye that keeps getting stronger and subtler. He trusts that beauty is vagueness's alluring upside.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Jeffrey M. Anderson
Combustible Celluloid
July 30, 2009
As far as nonfiction goes, you probably won't seen anything else this year so beautifully filmed.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Amber Wilkinson
Eye for Film
June 28, 2009
This blending of the truth and invention is a key plank of Chinese director Jia Zhang-Ke's work, which skates so close to documentary it is hard to spot the join.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Page 1 of 3