3

3

45%
  • 3
    2 minutes 50 seconds
    Added: Aug 31, 2011

Opening

97% Ghostbusters Aug 29
33% As Above/So Below Aug 29
35% The November Man Aug 27
98% Starred Up Aug 27
75% The Congress Aug 29

Top Box Office

92% Guardians of the Galaxy $17.2M
20% Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $16.7M
38% If I Stay $15.7M
20% Let's Be Cops $10.8M
18% When The Game Stands Tall $8.4M
34% The Expendables 3 $6.5M
32% The Giver $6.4M
46% Sin City: A Dame to Kill For $6.3M
65% The Hundred-Foot Journey $5.3M
20% Into The Storm $3.8M

Coming Soon

—— Innocence Sep 05
—— The Longest Week Sep 05
—— The Identical Sep 05
67% The House of Magic Sep 05
74% God Help the Girl Sep 05

New Episodes Tonight

—— Jonah From Tonga: Season 1

Discuss Last Night's Shows

88% The Cosmopolitans: Season One
100% Defiance: Season 2
100% Garfunkel and Oates: Season 1
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
56% Married: Season 1
39% Rush: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
82% Welcome to Sweden: Season 1
77% You're the Worst: Season 1

Certified Fresh TV

86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
91% Doctor Who: Season 8
83% Extant: Season 1
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
87% The Knick: Season 1
89% Manhattan: Season 1
97% Masters of Sex: Season 2
73% Murder in the First: Season 1
89% Outlander: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
87% The Strain: Season 1
82% Welcome to Sweden: Season 1
77% You're the Worst: Season 1

3 Reviews

Page 1 of 5
Carlos M

Super Reviewer

November 6, 2013
Tykwer seems to be more interested in pretentious artsy shots than creating a resonating story, and the fact that the female character is unbearable and the plot unbelievable and boring to death only helps make this film an ordeal to sit through.
Bill D 2007
Bill D 2007

Super Reviewer

September 27, 2011
The art-house just keeps shining in 2011. Thank God, because Hollywood has been awful for the most part this year. "Drei" (Three) is the next wonderful film on the art-house circuit.

From Germany's Tom Tykwer, one of the most original filmmakers in the world (you've GOT to see his under-rated 2006 film "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer"), comes an exploration of modern relationships, particularly with regard to bisexuality. More and more people are exploring bisexuality, and Tykwer is right there in the vanguard of this definitive 21st-century development.

There's no doubt in my mind that in the year 2100 most people in the Western world will consider themselves bisexual. People perhaps will look back at "Drei" as a harbinger of this. Tykwer is a true artist, in the sense that he has his finger on the pulse of evolution. He senses where we are going, and that's what interests him. In many ways, I think of artists as people who are several decades ahead of the rest of the population, sending us postcards from the future. This is certainly the case with Tykwer.

**********************************
In "Drei" we meet a happy, highly educated heterosexual couple approaching the age of 40. One is successful in the arts and the other in science. (One of the exhilarating aspects of "Drei" is how it captures the excitement of 21st-century science, particularly biology.) By pure happenstance, the husband and wife both make the acquaintance of a male scientist, and each starts falling in love with him.

Eventually, the truth is revealed. The scene where the three individuals discover the truth simultaneously is overwhelming. You can see the earth-shattering humiliation and confusion in all three characters. Just trying to contemplate the breadth of what each of the three must have been thinking and feeling in that moment stretches the mind and heart so far.

It's especially interesting to contemplate what's happening for the straight man. He's the only one going through an evolution of his sexual orientation. Unfortuantely, Tykwer glosses over this a bit. In fact, each character is reticent and doesn't say much about what is going on in their minds. We have to rely on the actors' faces to glean clues about the inner lives of the characters.

One nicely written scene involves the husband trying to figure out how to describe himself after the intensity of his same-sex attraction becomes clear. He gets tongue-tied trying to use the word "gay" to describe himself in a way that's quite affecting. One can really feel for him.

I won't reveal the ending, but it is interesting. The film slightly cops out in the end, presenting the characters as so open-minded as to be unrealistic. But still, there is so much food for thought in "Drei" that is interesting. The direction, furthermore, is expert. Tykwer directs with near-effortless charm and cogency. Every scene zips along elegantly and with real heart. This film is a joy.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

January 25, 2013
In "3," Hanna(Sophie Rois), a biologist and television presenter, and Simon(Sebastian Schipper), an art engineer, have grown to middle age together, through thick and thin, such as the serious illness and subsequent death of Simon's mother(Angela Winkler). With everything on her plate, it is no surprise that Hanna is distracted at a conference, thus not noticing Adam(Devid Striesow), a younger colleague. The second time they meet is when Hanna has an extra ticket to the theater due to Simon working late that she gives to Adam. The third time is less formal. But unbeknowst to her, at the same time, Simon is elsewhere badly needing her support when he is diagnosed with testicular cancer, followed quickly by some very graphic surgery.

While I thought "3" was stylish, erotic and thoughtful and handles its shifting viewpoints well, I know some people might find the movie somewhat pretentious due to Tom Tykwer's use of symbolism and numerology but I think this also works rather well, as these characters are at an age where they have their first serious brush with mortality and start to keep score of accomplishments and important events in their lives. While they may think time is running out, none of us know how much time we have left, not even Simon's mother, whose suicide attempt is cruelly interrupted. So, it is never too late and we should stop worrying so much about what we cannot help. However, for a movie so intent on flaunting conventions, it does sadly become awkwardly conventional late, breaking the magic spell for a brief period before its beguiling ending and memorable final image.
Dave J
July 22, 2014
Tuesday, July 22, 2014

(2011) Three
(In German with English subtitles)
ADULT DRAMA

To generalize the movie as a whole, which I must admit used the fast-forward button while playing on most scenes since it's direction is predictable, was that successful middle aged woman finds out her husband is also gay, and accepts his choice of lifestyle by getting involved in a threesome with her husbands lover at the end. And all of that job description stuff only serves as a backdrop to this predictable love triangular acceptance affair. And if viewers are aroused by it's characters appearing full frontal should be able to tolerate this movie even more. And to look at the big picture, the thesis of this movie may have been much more effective in it's native Germany, but over here in North America, perhaps on other First World countries it's point is bloody obvious.

1 star out of 4
May 8, 2014
Amazing and thought provoking. Challenging the conventional social norm of relationships.
March 10, 2013
Three tries so hard to be honest and open-minded, but, despite the good acting and solid direction, its lukewarm, poorly paced exploration of infidelity and polygamy remains, much like its characters, strangely cold, detached and futile instead.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

January 25, 2013
In "3," Hanna(Sophie Rois), a biologist and television presenter, and Simon(Sebastian Schipper), an art engineer, have grown to middle age together, through thick and thin, such as the serious illness and subsequent death of Simon's mother(Angela Winkler). With everything on her plate, it is no surprise that Hanna is distracted at a conference, thus not noticing Adam(Devid Striesow), a younger colleague. The second time they meet is when Hanna has an extra ticket to the theater due to Simon working late that she gives to Adam. The third time is less formal. But unbeknowst to her, at the same time, Simon is elsewhere badly needing her support when he is diagnosed with testicular cancer, followed quickly by some very graphic surgery.

While I thought "3" was stylish, erotic and thoughtful and handles its shifting viewpoints well, I know some people might find the movie somewhat pretentious due to Tom Tykwer's use of symbolism and numerology but I think this also works rather well, as these characters are at an age where they have their first serious brush with mortality and start to keep score of accomplishments and important events in their lives. While they may think time is running out, none of us know how much time we have left, not even Simon's mother, whose suicide attempt is cruelly interrupted. So, it is never too late and we should stop worrying so much about what we cannot help. However, for a movie so intent on flaunting conventions, it does sadly become awkwardly conventional late, breaking the magic spell for a brief period before its beguiling ending and memorable final image.
October 26, 2012
Exceptional like Tykwer I felt for all of them. Strong characters and development. Never once felt overshadow by any visuals or stylistic choices in fact I was completely engaged. I think people might be off put by exploring your sexuality hints the low score. Expand your mind.
August 21, 2012
oh... Tom Tykwer... of course!
The Creep
May 29, 2012
I see a lot of pontential here, but the film doesn't seem to know what it wants.

PLOT:Anchorwoman Hanna (Sophie Rois) and engineerng artist Simon (Sebastian Schipper) have been in love for at least 20 years and living with each other. They're real, down-to-earth, childless people that have been through a lot as a couple. Things are going pretty well with their romance until they each meet stem cell doctor, Adam (David Striesow) and fall in love with him. It's a intersting plot executed artisicly, but it is has a few development problems which I'll get to later on.

ACTING:The acting was pretty good throughout. I believe the best performances came from Sophie Rois as Hanna and David Striesow as Adam, but disagreeabley, I thought Sebastian Schipper was kind of bland as Simon. I didn't see true emotion come out through him as I did with Sophie and David.

SCORE:The score was made up of a few calm, mood-setting peices and a few notable songs. It was good, I'd say.

EFFECTS:I don't know if the effects were done in real time, considering this is an indie film, or if they were done through make-up and such, but they were good because they looked real and were even cringe-worthy, which I'll explain in the next section.

OTHER CONTENT:I am new to Tom Twyker's films and direction styles, but I can already see a lot of pontential in his style. He starts off the film with a passing car and a voice explaining the life of Hanna and Simon, along with an interpretive dance of the film's main events. It also had multiple screen shots at one time, a brief animation, and the notable scene of the three main characters lying naked fading against a white background. He has earned my respect with his unique direction and editing style for sure, but this had a couple major problems. The plot isn't real well developed; some of the events (such as Simon's mother's death and his testicular operation) have so little to do with the plot that it distracts from the main idea of the plot. It really just ends up as unneeded. Also, the character development as a small problem. Twyker tries to incorporate accurate character development by filming that little scene in the beginning with the passing car and putting those unneeded events in the film, but it doesn't make up for how we see their personalities shine. They end up looking like karma-stricken victims in a horror film due to the problems. This film wasn't really my cup of tea, to be truthful. At times it grossed me out and made me want to stop watching. I think that's another reason why I didn't favor it due to the wonderful direction...

OVERALL,an ok indie film with an intersting and artistic plot, pretty good acting, just good score, real-looking effects, and a visionistic direction by Twyker, but the plot isn't real well developed, the character development has a few problems, and the film just wasn't my type.
May 18, 2012
saya ga tau apakah di kehidupan nyata ada kejadian seperti tergambarkan di film jerman Drei ini. yang pasti, saya suka dengan endingnya. :)
September 4, 2011
The three primary actors are excellent as is the entire cast. The cinematography and film manipulation by Frank Griebe (with Twyker) and the musical score Reinhold Heil, Johnny Klimek, Gabriel Isaac Mounsey, and Tom Tykwer (with a little help form Debussy and others!) is splendid. This is a first class film and deserves the attention of a very wide audience. It is likely to be one of those films that grows in stature with the passage of time.
March 8, 2012
Más que una cinta con trama telenovelera es una reflexión sobre la sexualidad, el quebrar de los paradigmas y el amor. Una cinta que pudo convertirse en un drama cualquiera, destaca por la dirección y estilo de su director Tom Tykwer. El estilo est (C)tico del director esta presente en cada plano y la dirección de los actores es perfecta. La fotografía y la musicalización inmensas.
February 23, 2012
underwhelming is the word.
January 4, 2012
O filme tem uma história interessante, embora não exatamente original, e personagens com quem (C) possível, inicialmente, manter alguma identificação. Mas o ritmo irregular e o roteiro meio frouxo atrapalham um pouco a coisa. E o filme merecia uma personagem feminina mais interessante. Ganhou a terceira estrelinha quando o casal idoso que sentava ao meu lado saiu da sala, horrorizado, enquanto Simon e Adam descobriam mais possibilidades de seu relacionamento. :)
October 11, 2011
I thoroughly enjoyed watching this film, with its cheeky kitchy premise and how this threesome got together played out, realistically not.
October 9, 2011
Una película con un planteamiento interesante pero que en el desarrollo deja mucho que desear, a veces se pasa de pretenciosa otras veces brillante pero al final se siente que no encuentra su ritmo.
Bill D 2007
Bill D 2007

Super Reviewer

September 27, 2011
The art-house just keeps shining in 2011. Thank God, because Hollywood has been awful for the most part this year. "Drei" (Three) is the next wonderful film on the art-house circuit.

From Germany's Tom Tykwer, one of the most original filmmakers in the world (you've GOT to see his under-rated 2006 film "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer"), comes an exploration of modern relationships, particularly with regard to bisexuality. More and more people are exploring bisexuality, and Tykwer is right there in the vanguard of this definitive 21st-century development.

There's no doubt in my mind that in the year 2100 most people in the Western world will consider themselves bisexual. People perhaps will look back at "Drei" as a harbinger of this. Tykwer is a true artist, in the sense that he has his finger on the pulse of evolution. He senses where we are going, and that's what interests him. In many ways, I think of artists as people who are several decades ahead of the rest of the population, sending us postcards from the future. This is certainly the case with Tykwer.

**********************************
In "Drei" we meet a happy, highly educated heterosexual couple approaching the age of 40. One is successful in the arts and the other in science. (One of the exhilarating aspects of "Drei" is how it captures the excitement of 21st-century science, particularly biology.) By pure happenstance, the husband and wife both make the acquaintance of a male scientist, and each starts falling in love with him.

Eventually, the truth is revealed. The scene where the three individuals discover the truth simultaneously is overwhelming. You can see the earth-shattering humiliation and confusion in all three characters. Just trying to contemplate the breadth of what each of the three must have been thinking and feeling in that moment stretches the mind and heart so far.

It's especially interesting to contemplate what's happening for the straight man. He's the only one going through an evolution of his sexual orientation. Unfortuantely, Tykwer glosses over this a bit. In fact, each character is reticent and doesn't say much about what is going on in their minds. We have to rely on the actors' faces to glean clues about the inner lives of the characters.

One nicely written scene involves the husband trying to figure out how to describe himself after the intensity of his same-sex attraction becomes clear. He gets tongue-tied trying to use the word "gay" to describe himself in a way that's quite affecting. One can really feel for him.

I won't reveal the ending, but it is interesting. The film slightly cops out in the end, presenting the characters as so open-minded as to be unrealistic. But still, there is so much food for thought in "Drei" that is interesting. The direction, furthermore, is expert. Tykwer directs with near-effortless charm and cogency. Every scene zips along elegantly and with real heart. This film is a joy.
September 23, 2011
Tykwer shines when he's being who he is - a cinematic artist. He let's go in this film and plays with many things: love, lust, science, intellectualism, and an has an odd dabble in art criticism. At the start of the film there's a dance for two men and a woman, which felt like an ode to choreographer Pina Bausch who died in 2009, (probably while this film was being made). It's pure art and a prelude of the dramatic events to come. Then there's a comic sequence where Hanna, the lead female character, sits listening to a lecture on stem cell research but she's visualizing artist Jeff Koons and his Italian porn star wife's series of nude self portraits in various sex positions and unconsciously lusting after the speaker. All through the film Tykwer lets himself play with juxtapositions like this, visually, musically, and in the film's tone. I admit I'm not at all objective about this director's work because I love that he makes art films that include characters who evolve and respond in unpredictable ways.
Matt P

Super Reviewer

September 15, 2011
Dramatic romances and romantic comedies are one thing, but a dramatic romantic comedy? This is a recipe for messy shifts in tone and perhaps some ludicrous plot points.
Page 1 of 5
Find us on:                     
Help | About | Jobs | Critics Submission | Press | API | Licensing | Mobile