A Corner in Wheat Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ September 23, 2011
One of D.W. griffith's most memorable short films about the price raise on bread in a town that can already barely afford their wheat to begin with. As townspeople come up with a brilliant ideas and prove action against this awful dispute, a lot can be taken from this seemed-to-be basic storyline. The silent acting is fantastic, the story seems to become complex as it is told; However, it is easily understood. This is exactly what short films need to be nowadays. Sure it can be confusing and there is not enough detail about what is really going on, but the real focus is how much appreciation you can have for this magnificent director.
alice5mith
Super Reviewer
½ February 8, 2010
Uses a variety of technics and orchestrates them beautifully to serve the idea of the film, but more on the emotional than aesthetical level.
January 26, 2012
This was very eye opening for a lot of reasons: I knew several things about Griffith 1 that he was a southern racist and 2 a very talented film maker. But it also seems he was also an idealist in other venues and for his day a protagonist for Indian Americans and the poor that were taken advantage of by Wall Street. In this short film he highlights (based on a series of news articles) the plight of poor wheat farmers and urban poor who are at the mercy of unregulated Wall Street commodity traders who set the price of wheat. Literally buying at low-low prices crashing farmers into poverty and setting prices so high that bakers and others have to raise thier prices and in-poverishing the city poor while the Traders live like kings, Reminds me a lot of today's problems.
September 21, 2011
D.W. Griffith directs a decent short film about the effects of greed and its plight on the worker and the common man. It has a decent message, and it is well shot.
January 19, 2013
Scenes from the early 20th century of what an increase in the price of flour means to the rich and the poor. The message is very direct, and in the Griffith way, very daring, as he once again depicts in his masterly way a social struggle in a gripping and involving way.
ray
November 1, 2012
In little over ten minutes David Wark Griffith (I love his middle name) shows us why he's considered THE pioneer of modern film.
He anticipates Eisenstein's and his Soviet colleagues' cross cuttings and montage techniques and delivers a neat little moral play.

And, he accomplishes what only little directors can in such a short runtime - he actually made me mad - mad about this tycoon and all the people like him - and mad that in the more than hundred years since Griffith filmed this, so little has changed.

Watching this was an assignment for my studies but it's not only interesting from an analytical and historical stand point but just an effective and essential film you should watch if you can spare 15 minutes of your life.
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