A Cop (Un Flic) Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ February 12, 2014
While still a fine movie in its own right, there is precious little going on in Melville's final offering that followers of his work will not have seen better executed elsewhere. The Delon-Deneuve-Crenna triangle is too perfunctorily sketched to either convince or engage our interest. Of the three leads, Crenna does best, with Deneuve at her most icily vacant and Delon less appealing on the right side of the law. Curiously, the most sympathetically drawn and intriguing characters are in supporting roles: Riccardo Cucciolla's Paul, an ex-bank manager turned robber who reluctantly deceives his wife (Simone Valère) by pretending to be looking for work, and especially Valérie Wilson as Delon's transvestite informer. Worth seeing for a couple of typically excellent heist sequences, the second only marginally spoiled by some rather obvious model work.
sanjurosamurai
Super Reviewer
September 6, 2009
melville blends his usual style with a gripping crime story that tracks every detail as parts of the story unfold in almost real time. the only drawback might be the films accessability as it is so intelligently written and filmed that one might have to be almost too smart to track along the way, but those that follow the story will be drawn in. phenomenal film.
Super Reviewer
January 20, 2011
Jean-Pierre Melville's final project is a blue-toned caper film with two extended heist sequences and several long stretches without dialogue. Alain Delon (who also starred in Melville's "Le Samourai" and "Le Cercle Rouge") is now a good guy -- a detective on the trail -- and lead criminals Richard Crenna and Michael Conrad are presumably dubbed in French. Catherine Deneuve shows up for a few scenes to look beautiful but feels written into the story as a marketing move.

The most interesting segment is the second heist, an elaborate robbery of a train in motion. Unfortunately, the cost-cutting use of a miniature helicopter and train for the long shots is seriously embarrassing.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ March 16, 2009
[font=Century Gothic]Written and directed by Jean-Pierre Melville, "Un Flic" is a stylish heist movie with minimal dialogue(There is narration at the beginning that does nobody any favors.), that has not one heist, but two. The first is pulled off at a bank in gale force winds while the second serves as the climax of the film. In between is a Paris where it is impossible to tell the criminals from the police without a scorecard(or for that matter the men from the women). One of the gang of thieves is Paul Weber(Riccardo Cucciolla), an otherwise good man who has gotten desperate after being laid off as an assistant manager for a bank about a year before. On the other side of the fence is Police Superintendent Edouard Coleman(Alain Delon) who resorts to whatever methods he can to catch the criminals, whether it be relying on snitches or roughing up suspects. He even plays the piano a bit at a nightclub frequented by Simon(Richard Crenna), the gang leader. The only thing clear in this grey world is to never be a hero. Look where that will get you. [/font]
½ July 21, 2013
Jean-Pierre Melville's final film, a suspenseful but often passé crime thriller, maybe more shocking in 1972.
½ June 8, 2011
Alain Delon is my reason for having a Fetish for European Men, I see everything with him in it, just to hear him talk French.Catherine Deneuve has always represented an Unearthly Beauty to me.The Movie is interesting too.
July 10, 2007
The two key heist sequences are mindblowingly good. The train sequence's methodical single-takes are great. Crenna, Delon, Melville - all you need to know. Great stuff. It doesn't feel like it "hits the mark" in the third act, but with how good everything else is, the film can be forgiven for sure.
August 18, 2011
Career criminals wear fedoras and trenchcoats like its 1945 and they're attending a Robert Mitchum impersonation competition. Rain isn't weather; it's sexytime music for a cocaine heist. The world is covered in an uncompromising azure mist that squeezes the life out of every possibility of beauty, whether that beauty is reaching Catherine Deneuve's white blonde demeanor or an enticingly French city street. A Jean-Pierre Melville directed crime film rests in a middle-ground of romanticization and adamantine realism; it climaxes at the nearest sight of a Humphrey Bogart photograph, but it's also interested in telling a story where a robbery can be delivered with seamless perfection ... but that doesn't mean that a pessimistic cop won't catch up with you in the end in a hazardously bloody fashion.
"Un Flic" is a relatively minor Melville film (especially putting "Bob le Flambeur" and "Le Cercle Rouge" into consideration), but it's ravishing all the same. Like the problematic comprehensibility of "The Big Sleep," it isn't worried about tight narrative. It's about temperament and atmosphere, and it's safe to say that the ambience of "Un Flic" is penetrative enough to make your bones break. There's something uneasy that leaks from the ghost blue of the cinematography and Richard Crenna's depressed eyes; the placid slickness of it all can only reach so far before someone is shot.
Telling the interconnecting stories of a tireless cop (Alain Delon) and a nightclub owner (Crenna) who pulls off massively intricate jobs with big payoffs, "Un Flic" is squalid enough to make us squirm; criminals walk right under the noses of the police, while the police, as well-meaning as they are, are confined to a purgatory of law-breaking with payoffs that brings no one pleasure. In so many other crime films, there's a notion that once the main villains are locked up, the heroes are left satisfied, ready for their next big adventure. But "Un Flic" exists in an entirely different universe. The chasing and capturing of criminals is tiring, redundant even. Who is having more fun: the sinners, or the rule-followers?
Initially, the film seems as though it's going to transform into a full-fledged exercise in film noir style. Cigarettes are tossed around, liquor is spilled, and femme fatales are easy to come by. But the closer we get to the conclusion, we begin to realize something: Delon's character, Edouard Coleman, isn't a James Bond or a Frank Bullitt or a Harry Callahan. He is a man, a man who was intrigued by enforcing the law many moons ago but is finally growing restless from the unavoidable sleazy details he sees on a day to day basis. Behind his eyes is a glassy emptiness; if he were to throw away his badge this very moment, what difference would it make?
I suppose "Un Flic"'s melancholy edge is what gives it such a lasting impression. The story is too complicated to easily follow and the style is one and the same with Melville's other films. But that blue, that blue, is disturbing. Unlike black-and-white, it gives reality a grit never seen by the naked eye. Crime doesn't pay and don't we know it, but in "Un Flic," even renowned actors like Alain Delon and Catherine Deneuve can hardly live in a world this hopeless.
½ June 2, 2014
Melville's style.......keeps us on the edge of our seat.
November 30, 2012
hello

here is EL7KR


So i vouldt see the film , if it is posible ??

best
de m
Super Reviewer
January 20, 2011
Jean-Pierre Melville's final project is a blue-toned caper film with two extended heist sequences and several long stretches without dialogue. Alain Delon (who also starred in Melville's "Le Samourai" and "Le Cercle Rouge") is now a good guy -- a detective on the trail -- and lead criminals Richard Crenna and Michael Conrad are presumably dubbed in French. Catherine Deneuve shows up for a few scenes to look beautiful but feels written into the story as a marketing move.

The most interesting segment is the second heist, an elaborate robbery of a train in motion. Unfortunately, the cost-cutting use of a miniature helicopter and train for the long shots is seriously embarrassing.
February 22, 2012
Not his best, but Melville plays Delon's and Crenna's characters against each other and towards each other's goals so well that this film deserves more praise than it got. The ending is fairly shocking, yet somehow not a surprise at all, given the characterization and history of both the characters and Melville's directing style.
December 31, 2011
Alain Delon, a Paris police commissioner, has seen too much, and it disgusts him. He has nothing but disdain for the entire human race and if he had a bomb big enough, he'd probably blow up Paris and be done with it. He pulls punks into the station and beats them with the same concern he would show a smudge on a mirror. If he's about to nab a criminal and sees the guy is about to commit suicide, he looks away, lets him, and why bother having to deal with him alive. He has no friends because everybody is scum -- potential jailbirds he'll have to bother with. He's really angry, and Delon's blue eyes are moist throughout, deeply pained, because he's a man who hates being alive. Ignore what you read, this is another Melville masterpiece, foolishly name-changed for the US to Dirty Money from the actual title, "A Cop". Melville pulls in a couple of American actors, most important the superb Richard Crenna, as Delon's co-star and nemesis. There's a scene in a nightclub Crenna owns -- Delon comes in to "visit" Crenna and their mutual girlfriend Catherine Deneuve. The sequence is silent, as so much of Melville's work is. It's all about the eyes, Delon staring at Crenna, Crenna looking back at him, Delon staring, and finally just getting up and leaving. This is a heist movie. Crenna pulls a heist with his team at the beginning that had me with a knot in my stomach. It's a bank job. It's a prelude to a daring helicopter robbery of a batch of heroin being transported on a train. Delon has a stool pigeon, a glamorous transvestite, who tells him exactly where on the train the goods will be. But a pro named "Suitcase" has been hired to move the heroin. It's his niche. Delon has to work out who's pulling the job and track them down. He does it, ruthlessly and mercilessly, and when he's done, he looks at Deneuve, knowing she was in on it, leaves her for another go round, and takes a radio call for his next job, his next dealing with the trash that inhabits Paris. Melville is saying, in the main title and in Delon's dialog, in this final of his films, that cops by their nature are hardened and disdainful of the public. Melville didn't import American movie genres, he created genres that were copied by Hollywood. He was one of the greatest writer-directors in film history. He wrote scripts fearlessly without dialog. He let brilliant actors like Alain Delon do the sort of work Matt Damon does in the Bourne movies, which emulate Melville's Le Samourai. Stream all the Melville films and study them if you love cinema.
½ June 1, 2011
Uneven Melville. A very minor work. It's a shame, because the cast is good. Other than one or two scenes, this one is a boring mess. Skip it.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ March 16, 2009
[font=Century Gothic]Written and directed by Jean-Pierre Melville, "Un Flic" is a stylish heist movie with minimal dialogue(There is narration at the beginning that does nobody any favors.), that has not one heist, but two. The first is pulled off at a bank in gale force winds while the second serves as the climax of the film. In between is a Paris where it is impossible to tell the criminals from the police without a scorecard(or for that matter the men from the women). One of the gang of thieves is Paul Weber(Riccardo Cucciolla), an otherwise good man who has gotten desperate after being laid off as an assistant manager for a bank about a year before. On the other side of the fence is Police Superintendent Edouard Coleman(Alain Delon) who resorts to whatever methods he can to catch the criminals, whether it be relying on snitches or roughing up suspects. He even plays the piano a bit at a nightclub frequented by Simon(Richard Crenna), the gang leader. The only thing clear in this grey world is to never be a hero. Look where that will get you. [/font]
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