A Thousand Years of Good Prayers - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

A Thousand Years of Good Prayers Reviews

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Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
September 29, 2008
[font=Century Gothic]Sensitively directed by Wayne Wang, "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers" is a deeply moving film about Shi(Henry O), a retired rocket scientist and widower, going to vist his daughter Yilan(Faye Yu) in America. Yilan at first eats dinner with her father but soon gets annoyed and starts avoiding him which is strange behavior considering this may be the last time they ever see each other.[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]Her benign neglect reminded me of "Tokyo Story" in its lamenting of how badly treated the elderly are in society but in this case, it runs both ways, a reminder of how it is the generation gap that makes communication even more difficult than any language barrier. For example, despite his limited command of English, Shi manages well on his own and makes the acquaintance of others including a pair of Mormon missionaries. They quote from the Book of Mormon to which he replies with a quote from Marx.(I'll have to remember that for future reference...) This just goes to show that Shi is from a generation when Communism was still the orthodoxy in China. But now, he lives in a country that has changed massively and traveled to a strange country that he seeks to comprehend.[/font]
iLeo
Super Reviewer
½ July 26, 2008
A captivating movie that follows a lonely widower's journey to see his estranged daughter in America. Leaving poignant memories behind in China, Mr. Shi truly hopes that he can reconnect with his daughter, Yilan, and set upon a path where he can truly embrace the genuine meaning of family and fatherhood. He enters a country where the culture is stranger than the language itself, and surprisingly connects and befriends an elderly Iranian woman in a neighboring park. Mr. Shi realizes that in order to fully accept the present circumstances with his daughter, the past must also be fully recognized and accepted whether the many years that have come and gone.
Henry O, Feihong Yu, Vida Ghahremani, and Pasha D. Lychnikoff stars. Worthy!
June 20, 2014
Una pelicula maravillosa
December 6, 2011
Excellent multi-generational look at an aging Chinese man visiting his westernized daughter in America. First rate. You don't have to be Chinese to feel like you know you these people. Their situation is universal. Lovely movie.
April 14, 2010
A Grandious Family Drama that goes to the Heart and shows sensitive that we all Humans and Life is hard but beautiful there are Bad People everywhere and bad Things happen but we must enjoy the Good we have the Directions and Performance are hillarious it's one of this Movies that are so wonderful slow and real that you wish it was double as long
March 17, 2010
If I was able to stay awake, I would have enjoyed the movie more. The pace of the movie was SLOOOOOOWWWWW. Father and daughter do not communicate. I get it. But the father can easily talk with strangers. Annoying. I'd rather see more of the daughter. She looked hot.
May 18, 2009
Wayne Wang's direction is so poignant, the performances are real and touching. Very well written, a sweet and tender film. Simple and beautiful.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
September 29, 2008
[font=Century Gothic]Sensitively directed by Wayne Wang, "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers" is a deeply moving film about Shi(Henry O), a retired rocket scientist and widower, going to vist his daughter Yilan(Faye Yu) in America. Yilan at first eats dinner with her father but soon gets annoyed and starts avoiding him which is strange behavior considering this may be the last time they ever see each other.[/font]
[font=Century Gothic][/font]
[font=Century Gothic]Her benign neglect reminded me of "Tokyo Story" in its lamenting of how badly treated the elderly are in society but in this case, it runs both ways, a reminder of how it is the generation gap that makes communication even more difficult than any language barrier. For example, despite his limited command of English, Shi manages well on his own and makes the acquaintance of others including a pair of Mormon missionaries. They quote from the Book of Mormon to which he replies with a quote from Marx.(I'll have to remember that for future reference...) This just goes to show that Shi is from a generation when Communism was still the orthodoxy in China. But now, he lives in a country that has changed massively and traveled to a strange country that he seeks to comprehend.[/font]
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