And the Golden Globes Winners Are...

The champagne stops flowing, but the show keeps going.

It was missing the glitz and glitter of previous years, but the 65th annual Golden Globes were held via press conference yesterday, with Atonement, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, No Country for Old Men, and Sweeney Todd leading the crowd at two wins apiece.

Without cameras rolling, celebrities in attendance, or the winners on hand to collect their awards, the "ceremony" was over in 35 minutes (a length the producers might want to keep in mind for next year -- we're just saying). A list of the winners in the film categories follows below, with Tomatometers for each film in parentheses:

MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA
Atonement (83 percent)
American Gangster (79 percent)
Eastern Promises (88 percent)
The Great Debaters
Michael Clayton (90 percent)
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood (100 percent)

MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (86 percent)
Across the Universe (52 percent)
Charlie Wilson's War (92 percent)
Hairspray (92 percent)
Juno (92 percent)


PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Jodie Foster, The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Keira Knightley, Atonement

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood (90 percent)
James McAvoy, Atonement
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises
Denzel Washington, American Gangster
George Clooney,
Michael Clayton

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL
Marion Cotillard, La Vie en rose (74 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno
Amy Adams, Enchanted (94 percent)
Nikki Blonsky, Hairspray
Helena Bonham Carter,
Sweeney Todd

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL
Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Tom Hanks, Charlie Wilson's War
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages (89 percent)
John C. Reilly,
Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Ratatouille (96 percent)
The Simpsons Movie (88 percent)
Bee Movie (52 percent)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
The Diving Bell And The Butterfly (94 percent)
The Kite Runner, U.S. (65 percent)
Lust, Caution, Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis, France (100 percent)
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, Romania (96 percent)


PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE
Cate Blanchett, I'm Not There (80 percent)
Julia Roberts, Charlie Wilson's War
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton,
Michael Clayton

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE
Javier Bardem, No Country For Old Men (95 percent)
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson's War
John Travolta, Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)


DIRECTOR - MOTION PICTURE
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell And The Butterfly
Ridley Scott, American Gangster
Joe Wright, Atonement
Tim Burton, Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men

SCREENPLAY - MOTION PICTURE
Ethan Coen & Joel Coen, No Country For Old Men
Christopher Hampton, Atonement
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin, Charlie Wilson's War
Diablo Cody,
Juno

ORIGINAL SCORE - MOTION PICTURE
Dario Marianelli, Atonement
Howard Shore, Eastern Promises
Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder, Into the Wild (82 percent)
Clint Eastwood, Grace Is Gone (70 percent)
Alberto Iglesias, The Kite Runner

ORIGINAL SONG - MOTION PICTURE
"Guaranteed" from Into the Wild (82 percent), music & lyrics by Eddie Vedder
"That's How You Know" from Enchanted
"Walk Hard" from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story
"Despedida"
from Love in the Time of Cholera (28 percent)
"Grace Is Gone" from
Grace Is Gone

Source: Variety

Comments

Remarkable Potion

Brennan Goodwin

It's about time Eddie Vedder got some respect from the film industry. He didn't win for Big Fish or Dead Man Walking in the past, which pissed me off to no end. Also, Atonement winning for best picture is a joke. It was good, but No Country for Old Men should have won, and if not that, then There Will Be Blood should have taken it. Both of those movies wreaked of brilliance.

Jan 14 - 06:14 AM

PigsOnTheWing

Roger Wallace

I couldn't agree more. In the year that two masterpieces were made (No Country For Old Men and There Will Be Blood), neither wins best picture at the Golden Globes. Ridiculous.

Feb 23 - 02:22 PM

dahluzz

joe shmo

Up yours, Dick Clark Productions!

props for the rat.

Jan 14 - 06:22 AM

Wallcloud

Corey Mayne

Yay Sweeney Todd!!!!

Jan 14 - 06:49 AM

drummer257

Jon Strunk

Atonement? The best year for movies in a decade and they reconize it by giving atonement and sweeneny best pictures? How about no country and juno? They were each better in my opinion.

Jan 14 - 06:50 AM

Tora_Yuushi

Amatai *******

golden globes don't really matter anyway.. its the oscars that count for no country for old men... hopefully they take home the cake

Jan 14 - 06:52 AM

Scott M

Scott Macleod

If P.T.A. gets snubbed at the Oscars, it'll be almost as great a travesty as voters ignoring Scorsese for thirty years.

Jan 14 - 06:52 AM

minderbinder

anonymous anonymous

Nice to see the wins for Sweeney (although the musical/comedy category is typically weak and not an indication of oscar success) and especially Depp.

I've read a number of posts from people convinced that Simpsons was a shoo-in for the animation oscar...anyone still think that's even a remote possibility at this point?

Jan 14 - 06:52 AM

Baccus83

First Last

My feeling is that "The Simpsons" doesn't need any kind of recognition or validation from the Academy or the HFPA. They're part of the cultural zeitgeist, and therefore above awards. In any case, the movie itself is pretty much a longer, bigger-budget television episode. Voters, I'm betting, would be most likely to recognize projects that were conceived of from the beginning as animated features - Ratatouille, Persepolis.

I love The Simpsons, but it's not going to win any major award. Besides (and I could be wrong on this) doesn't it already have a whole ton of Emmys?

Jan 14 - 07:02 AM

dahluzz

joe shmo

I really have to disagree when people write off the simpsons movie as an extended episode. It was made as an experience on the big screen. images flying at you, the intense camera angles and larger-than-life plot. it was an event, not just an episode.

the quality of the writing and animation was way beyond anything the weekly show has offered in a number of years. and despite the highest of expectations, pretty much evertyone saw it and liked it. While it shouldn't beat out ratatouille for best animated feature, it does deserve the oscar nomination and a lot more respect than being called a long episode.

Jan 14 - 07:54 AM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

"My feeling is that "The Simpsons" doesn't need any kind of recognition or validation from the Academy or the HFPA. They're part of the cultural zeitgeist, and therefore above awards."

Unlike, say, Pixar?

Jan 14 - 11:00 AM

Baccus83

First Last

"Unlike, say, Pixar?"

Yes, unlike Pixar. Pixar is an animation studio that specializes in feature animation. "The Simpsons" is extremely popular television show that's been on for decades. They're completely different entities. "Finding Nemo" and "Ratatouille" and "The Incredibles" are one-shot films. They do not have new episodes each week.

Look at it this way. M*A*S*H was a popular movie before it was a popular television show. The movie version is widely acclaimed as a masterpiece. And the television show that followed remains one of the highest rated programs in television history. Now if they had made a movie of M*A*S*H using the same cast as the television show, AFTER the show had been on the air for, say, ten years, and amassed plenty of awards along the way, then what would be the point of giving it an Oscar? It's the same cast, the same writers, the same directors that have been doing everything together for ten years. Much like "The Simpsons." They've been doing that show forever, and they've got it DOWN.

It all adds up to this - the film has to be self-contained. The reason "The Simpsons" isn't going to win is because it's already a cultural institution. If you had never seen "The Simpsons" before, and "The Simpsons Movie" was your first glimpse at them, would you still think of it as a best animated feature contender?

The people at Pixar put out a different movie each year. And most of them are great films.

Jan 14 - 12:57 PM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

"It's the same cast, the same writers, the same directors that have been doing everything together for ten years. Much like "The Simpsons." "

You could say the same thing about Pixar: Of their 8 features, four have been directed by John Lasseter and two by Brad Bird. They do use the same creative team over and over, much like "The Simpsons." The primary difference is, with the exception of Toy Story 2, each movie has been self-contained. Yes, Pixar is a great team and yes they make great movies. They've got it down pat, which is why they consistently make the best CGI features out there. Pixar is a recognizable brand name and people will go see a movie based solely on the Pixar name, all of which brings me to my original point that Pixar is as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as "The Simpsons."

Jan 14 - 02:23 PM

Baccus83

First Last

"You could say the same thing about Pixar: Of their 8 features, four have been directed by John Lasseter and two by Brad Bird. They do use the same creative team over and over, much like "The Simpsons." The primary difference is, with the exception of Toy Story 2, each movie has been self-contained. Yes, Pixar is a great team and yes they make great movies. They've got it down pat, which is why they consistently make the best CGI features out there. Pixar is a recognizable brand name and people will go see a movie based solely on the Pixar name, all of which brings me to my original point that Pixar is as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as 'The Simpsons.'"

I guess I agree with you on this point, however I do think there's a vast difference between the two, namely that Pixar devotes itself completely to the cinema, coming out with a new movie each year, while Matt Groening & co. are coming up with new material every week. Pixar is part of the cultural zeitgeist, but "The Simpsons" is so embedded in our consciousness that we kind of take it for granted. I don't think a lot of people are going to give the movie a lot of recognition simply because it runs on the same formula, with the same characters as the television show that's been on for twenty years.

Pixar, though they often use the same group of people to make their films, always comes up with different ideas for their stories and characters. The thing that sets them apart is their obsession with telling a good story.

Jan 15 - 07:14 AM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

"I don't think a lot of people are going to give the movie a lot of recognition simply because it runs on the same formula, with the same characters as the television show that's been on for twenty years."

All true but if you were to give me a choice between Ratatouille and The Simpsons Movie and ask me which I would rather watch again, The Simpsons Movie would win hands down. Granted, that may just my long-running love for The Simpsons talking or it may be that I wasn't blown away by ANY of the other big animated movies this year.

I don't, however, anticipate The Simpsons Movie will win any awards. As you said, The Simpsons have been around so long they're taken for granted.

Jan 15 - 09:10 AM

Baccus83

First Last

"I'm just sick of these 3D animated films stealing awards because of their recycled plot lines."

What!? WHAT!?

Yes, it's "inspired" by Cyrano De Bergerac, but what the hell are you talking about? Recycled plot lines? Are you mad at "Atonement" and "No Country for Old Men" because they were adapted from books? What are you talking about? There's very few original ideas where plot is concerned anymore. There are only so many structures that a film can take before somebody comes along and says "oh, wait, that's been done before!"

"Ratatouille" is a masterpiece of not only art direction, but of plot structure, narrative economy and character development. I would go so far as to say it's a modern animated classic.

Jan 15 - 07:22 AM

Baccus83

First Last

Saw Atonement, Sweeney Todd, Juno and No Country and I have to say that they HFPA got it right. Still haven't seen There Will Be Blood, but it's on the list. I loved all of the above movies, don't get me wrong, but I thought Atonement was a phenomenal picture in almost every aspect.

Jan 14 - 06:54 AM

Baccus83

First Last

My feeling is that "The Simpsons" doesn't need any kind of recognition or validation from the Academy or the HFPA. They're part of the cultural zeitgeist, and therefore above awards. In any case, the movie itself is pretty much a longer, bigger-budget television episode. Voters, I'm betting, would be most likely to recognize projects that were conceived of from the beginning as animated features - Ratatouille, Persepolis.

I love The Simpsons, but it's not going to win any major award. Besides (and I could be wrong on this) doesn't it already have a whole ton of Emmys?

Jan 14 - 07:02 AM

dahluzz

joe shmo

I really have to disagree when people write off the simpsons movie as an extended episode. It was made as an experience on the big screen. images flying at you, the intense camera angles and larger-than-life plot. it was an event, not just an episode.

the quality of the writing and animation was way beyond anything the weekly show has offered in a number of years. and despite the highest of expectations, pretty much evertyone saw it and liked it. While it shouldn't beat out ratatouille for best animated feature, it does deserve the oscar nomination and a lot more respect than being called a long episode.

Jan 14 - 07:54 AM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

"My feeling is that "The Simpsons" doesn't need any kind of recognition or validation from the Academy or the HFPA. They're part of the cultural zeitgeist, and therefore above awards."

Unlike, say, Pixar?

Jan 14 - 11:00 AM

Baccus83

First Last

"Unlike, say, Pixar?"

Yes, unlike Pixar. Pixar is an animation studio that specializes in feature animation. "The Simpsons" is extremely popular television show that's been on for decades. They're completely different entities. "Finding Nemo" and "Ratatouille" and "The Incredibles" are one-shot films. They do not have new episodes each week.

Look at it this way. M*A*S*H was a popular movie before it was a popular television show. The movie version is widely acclaimed as a masterpiece. And the television show that followed remains one of the highest rated programs in television history. Now if they had made a movie of M*A*S*H using the same cast as the television show, AFTER the show had been on the air for, say, ten years, and amassed plenty of awards along the way, then what would be the point of giving it an Oscar? It's the same cast, the same writers, the same directors that have been doing everything together for ten years. Much like "The Simpsons." They've been doing that show forever, and they've got it DOWN.

It all adds up to this - the film has to be self-contained. The reason "The Simpsons" isn't going to win is because it's already a cultural institution. If you had never seen "The Simpsons" before, and "The Simpsons Movie" was your first glimpse at them, would you still think of it as a best animated feature contender?

The people at Pixar put out a different movie each year. And most of them are great films.

Jan 14 - 12:57 PM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

"It's the same cast, the same writers, the same directors that have been doing everything together for ten years. Much like "The Simpsons." "

You could say the same thing about Pixar: Of their 8 features, four have been directed by John Lasseter and two by Brad Bird. They do use the same creative team over and over, much like "The Simpsons." The primary difference is, with the exception of Toy Story 2, each movie has been self-contained. Yes, Pixar is a great team and yes they make great movies. They've got it down pat, which is why they consistently make the best CGI features out there. Pixar is a recognizable brand name and people will go see a movie based solely on the Pixar name, all of which brings me to my original point that Pixar is as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as "The Simpsons."

Jan 14 - 02:23 PM

Baccus83

First Last

"You could say the same thing about Pixar: Of their 8 features, four have been directed by John Lasseter and two by Brad Bird. They do use the same creative team over and over, much like "The Simpsons." The primary difference is, with the exception of Toy Story 2, each movie has been self-contained. Yes, Pixar is a great team and yes they make great movies. They've got it down pat, which is why they consistently make the best CGI features out there. Pixar is a recognizable brand name and people will go see a movie based solely on the Pixar name, all of which brings me to my original point that Pixar is as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as 'The Simpsons.'"

I guess I agree with you on this point, however I do think there's a vast difference between the two, namely that Pixar devotes itself completely to the cinema, coming out with a new movie each year, while Matt Groening & co. are coming up with new material every week. Pixar is part of the cultural zeitgeist, but "The Simpsons" is so embedded in our consciousness that we kind of take it for granted. I don't think a lot of people are going to give the movie a lot of recognition simply because it runs on the same formula, with the same characters as the television show that's been on for twenty years.

Pixar, though they often use the same group of people to make their films, always comes up with different ideas for their stories and characters. The thing that sets them apart is their obsession with telling a good story.

Jan 15 - 07:14 AM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

"I don't think a lot of people are going to give the movie a lot of recognition simply because it runs on the same formula, with the same characters as the television show that's been on for twenty years."

All true but if you were to give me a choice between Ratatouille and The Simpsons Movie and ask me which I would rather watch again, The Simpsons Movie would win hands down. Granted, that may just my long-running love for The Simpsons talking or it may be that I wasn't blown away by ANY of the other big animated movies this year.

I don't, however, anticipate The Simpsons Movie will win any awards. As you said, The Simpsons have been around so long they're taken for granted.

Jan 15 - 09:10 AM

Baccus83

First Last

"I'm just sick of these 3D animated films stealing awards because of their recycled plot lines."

What!? WHAT!?

Yes, it's "inspired" by Cyrano De Bergerac, but what the hell are you talking about? Recycled plot lines? Are you mad at "Atonement" and "No Country for Old Men" because they were adapted from books? What are you talking about? There's very few original ideas where plot is concerned anymore. There are only so many structures that a film can take before somebody comes along and says "oh, wait, that's been done before!"

"Ratatouille" is a masterpiece of not only art direction, but of plot structure, narrative economy and character development. I would go so far as to say it's a modern animated classic.

Jan 15 - 07:22 AM

opTIMus Nerd

Tim Ahlberg

While I thought The Simpsons was alright but I don't beleive it needs to be in this conversation. What was new, interesting or different about that movie? I am looking forward to the DVD buzz dying down as I am so tired of Spider-Pig and seeing giant Homer's everywhere with a freaking donut in his mouth. Enough already; this over-exposure has finally done them in as far as I am concerned.

Jan 14 - 07:41 AM

Plissken99

jameson mcfab

It sucks that No Country for Old Men didn't win best picture. I am glad that Duchovny won for his role in Californication, the only true justice I saw in these awards.

Jan 14 - 07:47 AM

savethemooses

Alex N

Duchovny was the only guy in his category who didn't deserve to win.

Jan 14 - 02:06 PM

dahluzz

joe shmo

I really have to disagree when people write off the simpsons movie as an extended episode. It was made as an experience on the big screen. images flying at you, the intense camera angles and larger-than-life plot. it was an event, not just an episode.

the quality of the writing and animation was way beyond anything the weekly show has offered in a number of years. and despite the highest of expectations, pretty much evertyone saw it and liked it. While it shouldn't beat out ratatouille for best animated feature, it does deserve the oscar nomination and a lot more respect than being called a long episode.

Jan 14 - 07:54 AM

denkyu

Julian Owyong

Yes! I saw No Country two days after seeing Atonement and still think Atonement is the better picture. No Country may have had better dialogue, tension and depth but Atonement takes the cake in terms of style and emotional impact w/c I personally tend to value more. Great choice for best drama imo.

Jan 14 - 07:54 AM

Avi

Avi R

Ratatouille is about the only one I agreed with. Walk Hard deserves an award. Didn't they write, like, 30 songs from scratch?

Jan 14 - 08:18 AM

Bane Of Anubis

C M

The problem w/ both NCFOM and Atonement was their endings (NCFOM was an existential WTF and Atonement was cloyingly Saving Privat Ryanesque); however, Atonement's middle also had issues (needless length made it ponderous at points), whereas NCFOM had some slow points, but mostly moved forward in smooth dramatic fashion.

Overall, Atonement had a better setup, but NCFOM seemed the better movie.

Jan 14 - 08:40 AM

Bane Of Anubis

C M

Oh, yeah, and I'm definitely on board w/ all these awards shows being 30 minutes long. Definitely could do w/o all of the mental masturbation going on.

Jan 14 - 08:41 AM

blackchimera

David Millet

I'm excited that Dario Marianelli won for Original Score. His music for Atonement is simply beautiful.

Jan 14 - 08:48 AM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

I dare say that, if the Oscar race is between "No Country For Old Men" and "Atonement," "Atonement" will win, hands down. Not necessarily that it SHOULD win (I haven't seen Atonement yet, so I don't have an opinion on it) but it will quite likely be a repeat of the "Fargo"/"English Patient" competition from 1996. "The Departed" not withstanding, gritty crime dramas almost never win the big prize--especially when there's a costume drama/war movie in the competition.

Jan 14 - 09:08 AM

Scarborough Fair

Kyle Beaudette

I hated the last half hour of no country for old men. Am I alone in this?

Jan 14 - 09:17 AM

TDeWolfe

Tim DeWolfe

I did to after I first saw it. But the more I thought about what happened and what Bell's opening and closing speeches, the more I began to understand it, although I still can't say that I liked the ending. Bell's visit with his uncle was pointless imo.

Jan 14 - 10:42 AM

savethemooses

Alex N

No, there are plenty of stupid people out there. :P

(But seriously.)

Jan 14 - 02:06 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

For all you people who love No Country, see There Will Be Blood before you decide. I thought Blood was superior in every way to No Country. God Bless Daniel Day Lewis, perhaps America's greatest living actor.

Jan 14 - 09:22 AM

BrianInSD

Brian Gaul

"God Bless Daniel Day Lewis, perhaps America's greatest living actor."

Which is ironic considering Daniel Day Lewis lives in Ireland.

Jan 14 - 09:39 AM

AquaFina

Dominic Iseli-Smith

Daniel Day Lewis is Irish.


Atonement is a fine film, but the sweeping epics will always and forever be held in higher regard than the quieter pics. The best of the year? No. Not even the biggest: PTA takes that category yet again. I have no complaints, but No Country is the tightest, most effective film of the year.

I do hope this puts James McAvoy into the spotlight, and gives Kiera Knightly some credibility.

Jan 14 - 09:46 AM

bschmidt

William Schmidt

he's british.

Jan 29 - 01:03 AM

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