Becket

Becket

76%
  • Becket
    1 minutes 46 seconds
    Added: May 9, 2008

Opening

70% The Equalizer Sep 26
70% The Boxtrolls Sep 26
84% The Two Faces of January Sep 26
—— Two Night Stand Sep 26
91% Jimi: All Is by My Side Sep 26

Top Box Office

63% The Maze Runner $32.5M
65% A Walk Among the Tombstones $13.1M
43% This Is Where I Leave You $11.9M
11% No Good Deed $10.2M
71% Dolphin Tale 2 $9.0M
92% Guardians of the Galaxy $5.2M
20% Let's Be Cops $2.7M
19% Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $2.6M
88% The Drop $2.0M
37% If I Stay $1.8M

Coming Soon

56% Men, Women & Children Oct 01
100% Gone Girl Oct 03
—— Annabelle Oct 03
67% The Good Lie Oct 03
—— 7500 Oct 03

Premieres Tonight

—— The Big Bang Theory: Season 8
—— The Blacklist: Season 2
50% Forever: Season 1
85% Gotham: Season 1
23% Scorpion: Season 1
—— Sleepy Hollow: Season 2

New Episodes Tonight

71% Dallas: Season 3
62% Under the Dome: Season 2

Discuss Last Night's Shows

—— American Dad!: Season 11
87% Boardwalk Empire: Season 5
53% The Lottery: Season 1
89% Manhattan: Season 1
97% Masters of Sex: Season 2
78% Ray Donovan: Season 2
87% The Strain: Season 1
—— Witches of East End: Season 2

Becket Reviews

Page 1 of 20
hunterjt13
hunterjt13

Super Reviewer

July 22, 2012
In a tale of nepotism gone wrong, Henry II appoints his friend Thomas Becket as Archbishop of Caterbury but isn't prepared for the consequences when Becket takes his commitment to God seriously.
Richard Burton plays Becket with a reserve and subtle conscience, and from the first moment, he makes the character profoundly interesting. He's helped by a good script that makes who Becket is the focus of the first act. Peter O'Toole is hilarious and at his scenery-chewing best, playing the madcap king with the kind of gusto that made him famous, and his third act scenes reveal a humanity - a pathos - that makes his character even more interesting.
Overall, despite the fine art direction, most of Becket is a character study involving the two leads, and the acting master class that is Burton and O'Toole is enough to carry this film admirably.
blkbomb
blkbomb

Super Reviewer

June 7, 2011
Becket is a fantastic period piece. It's long and some scenes are very drawn out, but it is well worth the watch. It's visually stunning and there isn't a bad performance in the film. Becket is the true story of the friendship of King Henry II and Thomas Becket. They have a strong friendship until Henry makes Becket the Archbishop of Canterbury. Becket loyalty turns from Henry to God and the King doesn't like that too much. It truly is an epic film.
AJ V

Super Reviewer

September 5, 2010
Two best friends, one an amoral king, the other a man of God. This movie has a great story and great actors for the characters. It's kind of long, but I really liked it, and I recommend seeing it.
MeetMeinMontauk
MeetMeinMontauk

Super Reviewer

October 26, 2010
Awesome, the first real bromance picture. As actors Burton and O'Toole did fantastically well. As was expected I think. O'Toole's character a bit more, it's what you get for being animated, I guess.
I will admit it dragged a bit towards the middle, but even for someone who isn't religious, I found it interesting and even funny at times and well worth watching.
Tim S

Super Reviewer

July 24, 2009
Great film with extraordinary performances by O'Toole and Burton. This film is one of the best examples of how a historically based character study should be done. Looks great and very well written. I enjoyed this film a lot.
Michael G

Super Reviewer

August 15, 2007
The chemistry between Burton and O'Toole is incredible. Shame the plot wouldn't let it last. I enjoyed Becket a lot more than I thought I would. It came off like a tight-assed Shakespearian story that I can rarely get into. Burton was great, but O'Toole stole the show. "I don't like my children!"--best line of the movie.
Ken S

Super Reviewer

May 5, 2007
This movie makes someone I know very horny...how facinating is that?
Cameron W. Johnson
Cameron W. Johnson

Super Reviewer

August 27, 2014
"Bend it Like Becket"! I stretch, but Beckett Media is a sporty publication, although this film is much older than David Beckham himself, so the pun still falls ferociously flat. On top of all that, this is a religiously-charged historical epic based on a French play, so it's anything but sporty. Well, at least it's less cheesy than "My Fair Lady", and while that isn't to say that "My Fair Lady" isn't good, it is to say that this film shows why the Golden Globes has a Best Musical category, because you'd think that the Oscars would be all over this. In 1963, the Golden Globes, not simply nominated, but awarded "The Cardinal" Best Picture-I mean, Best Drama, and in 1964, this film took home that same sort of bacon that the Catholics are actually allowed to enjoy, so for a while there, the Jews who undoubtedly make up much of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association were getting into Catholicism. One does have to give these two films credit for figuring out how to make subject matters dealing with Catholic archbishops interesting enough to be the basis for epics which, well, are still of varying intrigue. Hey, "The Cardinal" was compelling, and this film is pretty good, too, although it stands to be tighter, and more original, for that matter.

As a '60s period melodrama set in olde England, this film could have been either unique or formulaic, and it ultimately falls somewhere in between, having some refreshing elements, in addition enough derivative aspects to be rather predictable, anchored by familiar character types who actually stand to be more recognizable. Immediate background development is a little lacking, making the unlikable traits of the leads fairly glaring, and although gradual exposition is plentiful, the performances are more nuanced than the characterization whose degree of depth is inconsistent, but generally somewhat thin, as a supplement to the melodrama more than the humanity. Melodramatics are certainly unavoidable in this adaptation of a stage interpretation of 12th century English affairs of political, religious an human natures, and storytelling is generally sound enough for you to buy into the histrionics, but their familiarity makes it easier to feel their contrivances, which aren't even extreme enough to really flare up the intrigue. This olde English romanticism is no longer relevant and is plenty dry, and it would be embraced more if it wasn't overplayed in the form of minimalist dialogue, with plenty of dramatic weight, but little action behind it to reinforce a sense of consequence, and keep momentum going. As things stand, there's something kind of flat about the direction in certain places, for although there is enough inspiration to the storytelling and acting within this intimate drama to keep entertainment value adequate through sound intrigue, when kick falls, you really can't help but feel the length of this talkative and wandering affair which runs two-and-a-half hours. The film is a little too long to not have much go on, and with considerable competence, it engages through and through, though one's investment just has to be challenged by moments of familiarity, expository shortcomings, melodramatics, and pacing issues which threaten the final product's reward value. This reward value is ultimately near-firmly secured, because as much as the film tries your patience, it engrosses more often than not, at least aesthetically.

Actually, the aesthetic value of this film isn't especially outstanding, but it is solid enough to play some respectable role in reinforcing engagement value, with Laurence Rosenthal turning in a conventional, but grand score, while Geoffrey Unsworth's cinematography carries enough sweep to its lensing to make up for some shortage of flare to relatively briskly defined lighting and coloration. Unsworth's grand eye at least gives you a well-rounded feel for Maurce Carter's art direction, whose orchestration of John Bryan's production designs and Margaret Furse's costume designs sells the time both lavishly and realistically, and therefore playing an instrumental part in immersing you into this melodrama which thrives on its intimacy. Sure, the intimacy of this drama minimalizes the scope of this pseudo-epic, making it hard to deny the excessiveness of the two-and-a-half-hour-long runtime, just as conventional occasions and moderate underdevelopment make the histrionics harder to deny, and yet, this study on how great men of a romantic time interpreted politics, religion, peasants, each other and, most of all, themselves is thematically rich, with high intellectual and dramatic potential to be done justice. Peter Glenville's direction has flat spots to really slow down momentum, but where it could have been drier and duller, its thoughtfulness falls over enough consistent dramatic material to carry a subtlety and grace that draw upon the intellectual value of this melodrama, broken up by resonant moments of delicate tension which secure the engagement value of the directorial storytelling. I suppose Glenville's direction doesn't hit quite as many missteps as Edward Anhalt's writing, although this script may do a greater justice to Jean Anouilh's classic story than the directorial storytelling, rich with glowing dialogue to sustain entertainment value through all of the overt chit-chat, while characterization manages to be just meaty enough for nuanced performances to compensate for expository shortcomings. Indeed, if nothing else makes this character melodrama so compelling, it is the across-the-board strong performances in a gifted cast, from which the leads stand out, with Richard Burton being unevenly used, yet consistently engrossing in his subtle, convincing portrayal of a man of sophistication and faith who respects and challenges the questionable aspects of a loving king, while Peter O'Toole steals the show in his dynamic, intense portrayal of a man of great power and corruption who is initially charismatic in his sleaze, but grows to be a wreck when his humanity is stressed to him through betrayal and a fear of his own mortality. These two leads and their electric chemistry are the heart and soul of this intimate epic of little dynamicity, but considerable intrigue, driven by inspiration on and off of the screen which make the final product a rewarding trial for one's patience.

In conclusion, there are occasions of conventions and some unevenness to the depth of characterization, while melodramatics keep too consistent to be ignored in the draggy telling of an intimate story of limited urgency, but through grand score work and cinematography, immersive art direction, sophisticated direction and writing, and effective performances, - the most powerful of which being by the solid Richard Burton and the outstanding Peter O'Toole - Peter Glenville's "Becket" rewards as an intimate portrait on the conflicts between men of religion and humanity and men of royalty and corruption.

3/5 - Good
John B

Super Reviewer

August 26, 2007
Beautiful! Only the English know how to create a great historical drama and they faceoff between Burton and O'Toole is fabulous. I personally enjoyed O'Toole's performance slightly better.
Alec B

Super Reviewer

May 7, 2011
There are scenes that are dramatically dull and the characters endless speeches do belabor the point repeatedly, however for the two central performances of Burton and O'Toole (and John Gielgud's cameo) it is really great to watch. And while the film's themes are repetitive its still delightfully subversive in moments, especially when it suggests how easily the masses are placated by simple religious gestures.
constanzaboutter
constanzaboutter

Super Reviewer

April 8, 2009
Depth and quality performances turned in by its stars, refined, unaffected, and effortless, delivering lines from a superb screenplay with an interesting subject at its heart. Sumptuous sets and colorful costumes.
hawkledge
hawkledge

Super Reviewer

April 8, 2009
Serious, stagey historical drama, Burton and O'Toole are great sparring partners. They and John Gielgud, as French king Louis VII, displaying tremendous acting talent.
cody f

Super Reviewer

July 24, 2008
Great film! Burton and O'Toole are so good that its a shame they didn't do more films together. To see them in a 60's version of Tango and Cash or Lethel Weapon would have been one of the best films of all time. It also helps me to sleep at night to hear Robert Osborne say that the 2 men were drinking buddies and agreed not to drink until they got the characters down, that lasted 2 days then they were drunk while filming the rest of the picture. O'Toole's King Henry acts like a spoiled child who only cares for one thing in the world, his friend Becket. O'Toole creates one of the best film characters and shines throughout. (I think Gene Wilder uses this character in Start The Revolution Without Me.) Burton's Becket is an incredibly intellegent man who changes a few times throughout the film. All you want to see is these two men together and have them conquer Europe..The only problem I had with the film was how quickly Becket converts into a christian. Add 10 to 15 minutes to this already 2 plus hour film and it could be even better.
September 23, 2012
A great duo of Burton and O'Toole. I was surprised how well they worked together. Becket as reason and loyal while Henry II is free and mad. The movie overall is very dry, but the history and powerful performances kept me interested. The theme of duty vs friendship was one I enjoyed and I hope that I can only be as true to myself and my duty as Becket was. To be able to see consequences showed his wisdom and inspired me to think about how I approach opportunities of power. So much of this movie rings true.
greyhound109
March 12, 2011
Peter O'Toole's talent supercedes his time. The equally celebrated Richard Burton fails to earn his fame. The film over all is good, attention-retaining, but a little too long. B+
halorocker44
January 4, 2008
all you need to know is that peter o'toole was in this movie, that automatically makes it a great film
jscottcorley
June 30, 2009
O'Toole steals the show from Burton and then Gielgud steals the show from O'Toole. A little too long and unbalanced with the first hour flying by and the last 90 minutes dragging interminably.
filmguy55
May 4, 2009
Peter OToole is amazing here. He is one of the greatest actors in movie history. This is great historical film. Do yourself a favor, watch this film.
August 23, 2008
a two and a half hour british adaptation of a historical stage play. sounds boring, doesn't it? but this film is not. like many films of this type, the soap opera personal stories run rampant, and there are some blatant soliloquys. these small flaws aside, the grandeur and gravitas of the film is very impressive. the sets and locations are astounding, nothing short of demille. the gothic cathedrals that provide the backdrop for many of the scenes may be too ornate to be historically accurate. then again, this is a time at the height of the church's power. this movie could be watched silent, so good the art direction is. also, the two leads are equally magnificent and deserving of any and all accolades they may have received. the film also sports a very solid script with tons of memorable lines and a cynical bent that i enjoyed personally. this movie is fully deserving of its status as a classic and gets my vote for the best picture of 1964. granted i have probably seen about 2 movies from that year.
paulhue86
November 23, 2008
Excellent. Perhaps my favorite O'Toole, even considering LoA (Larry of Arabia). You will love how how horribly he talks to his wife, mother, and young son. It is obviously an obsessive unrequited buddy love story, perhaps the best ever of this story line. A very enjoyable albeit brief performance by Gielguld. Burton is in top form, though without a chance to devour the set as he does in Iguana or Virgina Wolf. I think that's why I consider rating this as my favorite O'Toole, because O'Toole devours two queens (is wife and mum), a prince and king (his poor son, whom he eviscerates as prince, then promotes to king for the purpose of epically humiliating), and then even quite literally himself. Amazing to watch. There is the occasional production lapse (horse rides against phony backdrops). But especially forgivable considering today's super productions which lack all aspects of real drama.
Page 1 of 20
Find us on:                     
Help | About | Jobs | Critics Submission | Press | API | Licensing | Mobile