Bonnie and Clyde Reviews

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Jeffrey M. Anderson
Combustible Celluloid
May 26, 2006
Freed from the production code that drove most of the old Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s and 40s, Arthur Penn gave Bonnie and Clyde a new kind of thrilling glee.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
Rob Thomas
Capital Times (Madison, WI)
May 12, 2006
Dated in some ways, still shocking and powerful in others.
| Original Score: 4/5
Top Critic

Time Out
February 9, 2006
With its weird landscape of dusty, derelict towns and verdant highways, stunningly shot by Burnett Guffey in muted tones of green and gold, it has the true quality of folk legend.
Christopher Null
Filmcritic.com
October 1, 2005
You'll never root for the bad guys more than you will here.
Full Review | Original Score: 4.5/5
Jake Euker
F5 (Wichita, KS)
March 9, 2004
A film of enormous aesthetic and historical importance. American filmmaking turned a corner with its release, and it can never now turn back.
| Original Score: 5/5
Victoria Alexander
FilmsInReview.com
October 1, 2003
Memorable and breathtaking.
| Original Score: 5/5

TV Guide's Movie Guide
July 30, 2003
The film set new standards for screen violence but it alternated its scenes of mayhem with lyrical interludes and jaunty slapstick sequences accompanied by spirited banjo music.
Full Review | Original Score: 4.5/5
Top Critic
Bosley Crowther
New York Times
May 20, 2003
It is a cheap piece of bald-faced slapstick comedy that treats the hideous depredations of that sleazy, moronic pair as though they were as full of fun and frolic as the jazz-age cutups in Thoroughly Modern Millie.
Full Review | Original Score: 1/5
Top Critic
James Berardinelli
ReelViews
May 1, 2003
It should readily be apparent that there is something special about the production, with its brash, vivid style, indelible performances by movie icons, and bold mixture of violence and comedy, romance and tragedy.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
Moira Sullivan
FilmFestivals.com
April 23, 2003
Some scenes are violent even by today's standards. Robbing during the depression is highly glamourized, especially with the youthful good looks of Beatty and Dunaway.
| Original Score: 5/5
Alex Sandell
Juicy Cerebellum
April 22, 2003
Not as revolutionary as it once was, the film still packs a punch.
| Original Score: 3/5
March 12, 2003
The question is whether it adds up to anything truthful, or evokes disquiet by crudely trying to con us into emotional reactions that do not make much sense.
Marjorie Baumgarten
Austin Chronicle
March 10, 2003
So definitive in so many ways, Bonnie and Clyde has become a 20th-century touchstone.
James Rocchi
Netflix
November 7, 2002
This film is worthy of the attention of anyone who's interested in classic American cinema.
Full Review | Original Score: 5/5
Michael W. Phillips, Jr.
Goatdog's Movies
September 26, 2002
For good or bad, movies were never the same again.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Ken Hanke
Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)
August 7, 2002
Not as good as it once seemed, but a landmark film
| Original Score: 4/5
Jonathan R. Perry
Tyler Morning Telegraph (Texas)
August 3, 2002
The bloody, baroque godfather of post-modern American cinema. One of the ten greatest films ever made.
| Original Score: 5/5
Jeffrey Westhoff
Northwest Herald (Crystal Lake, IL)
July 26, 2002
Like The Graduate, this doesn't live up to its legendary status. Time has worn away its impact.
| Original Score: 3/5
Scott Weinberg
eFilmCritic.com
July 26, 2002
Shocking, violent, extremely entertaining.
| Original Score: 5/5

Boxoffice Magazine
June 5, 2002
Warren Beatty hardly seems the desperado type, but Faye Dunaway is convincing in her role as his companion in robbery and murder.
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