Bonsái Reviews

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Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ May 14, 2012
In "Bonsai," a group of university students spend the night together at a friend's house where they all pair off. That leaves Julio(Diego Noguera) looking for company which he finds with Emilia(Nathalia Galgani). Of the two, he is the first one to take off his trendy T-shirt, revealing the worst sunburn lines in history. After they become a couple, he also helps her move in with her friend Barbara(Gabriela Arancibia).

(At some point in the future, Emilia will die and Julio will be alone.)

Eight years later, Julio is working a series of odd jobs that includes word processing for Gazmuri(Hugo Medina), a noted author. Except he finds that somebody can do the job cheaper. That does not stop Julio from continuing with the job, concocting his own manuscript, while carrying on with his neighbor Blanca(Trinidad Gonzalez), an interpreter.

Armed with a sardonic wit, "Bonsai" is a thoughtful movie about revisiting the past through creative writing, by posing some intriguing questions. Is it ever too late to reclaim what was lost? Or maybe there was no hope in the first place. For Julio, this line of thought arises when he is meeting someone new, as he also remembers his first introduction to the writing of Proust who had his own second thoughts.(Before a showing of the movie of "Time Regained," the speaker asked the audience if we had all read Proust, like in this movie. I hadn't) But with any difficult literature, maybe Julio is not experienced enough to comprehend it well at a time when he was taking a lot for granted. Remember, just because you are smart, does not mean you know everything.
June 8, 2013
If Bret McKenzie and an angst-ridden Denise Huxtable had Chilean doppelgangers, they would be playing the lead roles of this film. Well-made adaptation (no easy feat) and engaging characters that welcome a closer look.
½ January 16, 2012
A delightful auto-biographical nostalgic look back at a struggling author's college years and examination of his past relationships with most emphasis on his college girlfriend. Pace is a bit pedantic and slow due to utilization of long takes of the minutia of everyday life by a NOT so genetically blessed cast, but it will slowly charms you because his nostalgia caused by his late twenty something frustration with his stalled life is so very relateable. 500 Days of Summer was the film that came to mind since Bonsai also examines the start and end of relationship(s) via switching montages between different times for the plot to unfold. While not as quirky as 500 Days, Bonsai was, like a good dog eared book that took you some time to finish, an impressive and endearing entry from the emerging Chilean film industry
September 24, 2012
I got through about 30 minutes of it and just couldn't take it anymore. Slow, and pointless. The characters were completely uninteresting.
½ September 28, 2012
The movie makes you think of the future and the past, and realize that we are played by fate.. Nothing is permanent.
September 3, 2012
very slow movie but sumting different
August 26, 2012
Such a waste of time! Ridiculous how many shite movies are being produced these days...
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ May 14, 2012
In "Bonsai," a group of university students spend the night together at a friend's house where they all pair off. That leaves Julio(Diego Noguera) looking for company which he finds with Emilia(Nathalia Galgani). Of the two, he is the first one to take off his trendy T-shirt, revealing the worst sunburn lines in history. After they become a couple, he also helps her move in with her friend Barbara(Gabriela Arancibia).

(At some point in the future, Emilia will die and Julio will be alone.)

Eight years later, Julio is working a series of odd jobs that includes word processing for Gazmuri(Hugo Medina), a noted author. Except he finds that somebody can do the job cheaper. That does not stop Julio from continuing with the job, concocting his own manuscript, while carrying on with his neighbor Blanca(Trinidad Gonzalez), an interpreter.

Armed with a sardonic wit, "Bonsai" is a thoughtful movie about revisiting the past through creative writing, by posing some intriguing questions. Is it ever too late to reclaim what was lost? Or maybe there was no hope in the first place. For Julio, this line of thought arises when he is meeting someone new, as he also remembers his first introduction to the writing of Proust who had his own second thoughts.(Before a showing of the movie of "Time Regained," the speaker asked the audience if we had all read Proust, like in this movie. I hadn't) But with any difficult literature, maybe Julio is not experienced enough to comprehend it well at a time when he was taking a lot for granted. Remember, just because you are smart, does not mean you know everything.
May 11, 2012
Dont think I will be going to this film...based on the reviews of the critics
½ March 19, 2012
Beautiful yet at times painful and realistic exploration of the start and end of relationships. Despite being told how the film will conclude at the first scene, you end up capsulated and drawn in. Although, the jumps in timeline do make you feel a bit withdrawn from the characters.
½ February 15, 2012
Alternates between the beginnings and endings of a relationship. Lovely, charming scenes which don't, ultimately, come together to tell a story. I enjoyed it while it was occurring, though.
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