Five Favorite Films With Director Rian Johnson

The Brothers Bloom director picks his favorite con man movies.

Rian Johnson

With Brick, Rian Johnson established himself as a filmmaker to watch. An audacious debut, it set a classic film noir plotline within a contemporary high school setting, and helped establish Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a leading man. Now, Johnson's back with The Brothers Bloom, a globe-trotting con man movie starring Adrien Brody, Mark Ruffalo, and Rachel Weisz that hits theaters this week. In an interview with RT, Johnson decided to select his five favorite con man movies of all time. He also talked about the script of his sci-fi project Looper, and explained why filmmakers are often con men themselves.







Paper Moon (1973, 96% Tomatometer)
Paper MoonI'm a film school nerd, so I've got about a hundred favorite movies. I'd feel like I was cheating on all of them if I narrowed it down to five movies. But con man movies I can do. In no particular order, I guess the first one I'd name is Paper Moon, which, for me, is just a perfect film. It's also one of the first con man movies I saw that was less about the mechanics of plot and more about the relationships between the characters, and this father-daughter relationship, which is really beautiful. Just a pretty wonderful movie.

RT: At that point in his career, Peter Bogdanovich seemed to be toying with some classical cinematic forms. Obviously, Brick tweaked the noirs of the 1940s, and now you've made a con man movie. Do you think that you're operating along similar lines?

I guess so, yeah. That's the interesting thing about Paper Moon. It's one of the things I admire about it so much, is that there is this kind of formalism to it, in terms of it mimicking the style, or... Not mimicking; mimicking is the wrong word. That sounds like I'm... Mimicking doesn't do it justice, but ... Absorbing. Using the style of previous films. However, what I admire about it so much is how emotionally authentic it still is. I'm a sucker for anything that can reach for big things stylistically and still connect on a human emotional level, and that's what that film does so well. You know, they're doing this crackerjack dialogue, and in some ways it's very arch, but at the same time it feels completely real.




House of Games (1987, 96% Tomatometer)
House of GamesOkay, how about House of Games as kind of the David Mamet representation? You need him in there if you're gonna talk about con man movies. It's a movie I love more and more every time I see it. I just think it's beautifully constructed, and it also really has something on its mind in terms of this kind of dark, sticky psychology of the con and of our human fascination with the con. It's just a terrific film, and it's also a lot of fun. I mean, the opening card game scene. That's got Ricky Jay in it, Joe Mantegna, you know. "I'm from the United States of kiss my a--." [laughs] It's one of the all-time great card table scenes in all of cinema, I think.

RT: I've probably seen that one, at least in bits and pieces, about three times, and it seems like every time I've see it, I'm still sort of like, "Okay, what's going on here?"

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, exactly. No, it has a strange... And the whole movie has this very dreamlike quality to it, you know?

RT: Everyone's getting conned.

Yeah, absolutely. The most mysterious thing about the film is what's going on in [Lindsay Crouse's] head. That's the real mystery for it. Where's this woman coming from? And that's what the very last shot of the film kind of, you know... That's why the very last shot of the film -- that great close-up of her face at the end is the true payoff to the whole thing. For me, at least, that's the true mystery of the movie.




The Man Who Would Be King (1975, 100% Tomatometer)
The Man Who Would Be KingYou know, I'm gonna put this one in because it is actually one of my favorite films of all time, although technically it's probably not a con man movie. The Man Who Would Be King. I did a Festival of Fakery. I did a little mini film festival which I kind of curated at the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles, and this was one of the movies that I showed. It's about these two characters who do kind of go to pull off this con of pretending to be, you know, one of them pretends to be a god so that they can rule this small territory, basically. But as I watched it, it does actually, I don't know, to me it does kind of play like a con man movie and also has the essential buddy relationship. The two rascals, I guess, standing back to back and fooling the world, which is reflected also in another one of the films in my list. This particular dynamic is probably my favorite.

RT: Are you particularly a John Huston fan as well?

Oh yeah. I love John Huston. Big, big John Huston fan. Even though this movie is dearly in need of a DVD update -- I think the one that I have is still double-sided, actually. I don't know if they've released a proper DVD of this, but he does have this beautiful vintage behind-the-scenes piece that's got Huston out there on set [mimics John Huston's voice] "talking about how this is a grand adventure in the true nature of the word. A grand adventure in every way." It's fantastic. They really don't make 'em like they used to when it comes to John Huston. One for the ages.




The Sting (1973, 91% Tomatometer)
The StingAnd then, I guess, The Sting is the next one I gotta say. This was for me, and probably for a lot of people, at least of our generation, our first exposure to con men movies was from The Sting. It really holds up. Like a lot of the movies on this list, it holds up because of the central relationship, because of the Newman-Redford thing. Watching those two guys together, even though at this point, plotwise, I would be fairly... Well, I don't know. I wonder, if someone saw The Sting clean for the first time today, now with all the movies that have imitated it in the years since, whether anyone would actually kind of say "Oh my God" at the end of it. I don't know, but I don't know that it would matter, because I think the fun of the film is in the game playing, and specifically in the way that these two guys play off of each other. It seems like something that's particularly vulnerable, just because of the twist, the nature of the end. But like I said, that's not really what makes the movie tick, oddly enough. It holds up just as a really fun ride.



F for Fake (1976, 87% Tomatometer)
F for FakeI got four, and there's one more. It's a biggie. And again, this is one that's maybe a little bit of a stretch in terms of it being a con man movie, but I actually don't think so. It's F for Fake. If I was numbering these, this might be number one. It's a movie that's really hard to define. It's pretty commonly termed a filmic essay by Orson Welles on the subject of fakery, but it's a lot more than that. It's so many things. I don't even know how to start talking about it. At its essence, it is about what we were just talking about. It's about the charlatans and fakery and the notion of fake versus real, and the notion of the con versus legitimacy, I guess. And he just digs into that pretty deeply. And also in a way that's so incredibly entertaining. The way that the movie's cut, also, you would think that, today with our shorter and shorter attention spans and our notions of fast cutting, you would think that the way that Orson Welles, the style in which he cuts this film, would be easily absorbed by us. But I actually... You know, I have friends of mine who are much, much younger than me. You know, it actually took a second viewing to kind of absorb the film. I mean, it really is still pretty insane, the abstract way that Welles cut this whole thing together and made the whole together work. I feel like he's absolutely self-aware; that's part of the act. That's what's fun. And that's why that opening sequence in the train station, you see him putting on that character and very much doing the... You know, I think he's aware of it. I think he's also aware that it's kind of funny, that that's part of the gag, you know, is pretending to be somebody you're not, putting that on. Putting on that big cape and that big hat, and being that guy. And, you know, if you're Orson Welles, you can pull it off.


Next: Rian Johnson explains why filmmakers are like con men.

Comments

Some guy you dont know

Bruce Campbell

Good man.

May 13 - 05:37 PM

inactive user

Jared King

Aaah, "The Sting". It just is greatness, in every way imaginable.

May 13 - 05:43 PM

John A.

John Arminio

"The Man Who Would Be King" is such a great movie and kind of underrated today; I never really hear people talking about it, but it's fun times aplenty. It's pretty hard to go wrong when you have John Huston directing Sean Connery and Michael Caine.

May 13 - 05:51 PM

jokerboy1991

jack giroux

Awesome list, Brick and The Brothers Bloom are great.

May 13 - 06:15 PM

nate2709

Nate 2709

House of Games is really good, back when Joe Mantegna wasn't just known as that mob guy on The Simpsons.

May 13 - 06:27 PM

arendr

Arend Anton

Hooray for "The Man Who Would Be King."

May 13 - 07:09 PM

Bloody Mathias

Mathias N/A

Wow, talk about a dense list. All 5 are masterpieces in my book.

May 13 - 07:39 PM

FinalDestination019

Olivia Prongrer

Finally, a list with unconventional choices! Great list.

May 13 - 07:54 PM

steve s.

steve smith

wow! house of games........verrrrry good pick.......awesome list!

May 13 - 08:25 PM

Bob S.

Bob Saccomano

I loved Brick and can't wait for The Brothers Bloom. Awesome list from an awesome writer/director.

May 14 - 12:13 AM

Poor_Frisco

Christian Estabrook

Brick was a phenomenal debut. I've watched that movie so many times. Can't wait to see what he does with The Brothers Bloom.

May 14 - 07:56 AM

Dave J

Dave J

A natural film buff

May 14 - 02:03 PM

tomwaitsjrHAPPYICONOCLAST

Greg Guro

=)

Great list.

How the #$#$ isn't THE STING at 100%? There are people that didn't like it? BOO!

May 14 - 04:52 PM

Krypton

Jeremy Paul Hongco

Oldies but goodies! : )

Great list!

May 15 - 12:45 AM

inactive user

Jared King

Hmm. This may be the first time NO ONE has complained. Good.

May 15 - 10:44 PM

Robert K.

Robert Kimberlin

I like the sting ok but the oscar should have gone to the exorcist.

May 18 - 08:42 AM

What's Hot On RT

Critics Consensus
Critics Consensus

Transcendence is a Sci-Fi Snooze

Total Recall
Total Recall

Johnny Depp's Best Movies

24 Frames
24 Frames

Picture gallery of movie bears

Good Friday
Good Friday

50 movie posters gallery

Find us on:                 
Help | About | Jobs | Critics Submission | Press | API | Licensing | Mobile