Cherry Bomb Reviews

Page 1 of 1
July 25, 2012
A group of guys rape a stripper. She goes after them and tries to kill them. They hire a killer to kill her and her brother.

This movie was pretty shit. The bad guy was horrible. The acting was bad. Complete 'B' film. Waste of time.
½ July 19, 2010
Designed for audience range of age 17-19, which will certainly limit it's box office, so this is a DVD movie. A rocker that doesn't quite rock. Cute poses, style, good photography, editing, all the elements to make something memorable, but Cherrybomb does not quite make a real movie. More bomb than cherry. Almost successful.

Robert Sheehan does the best acting in this film, but it seems like he's in the wrong movie.
July 18, 2010
A movie tragic,interesting. Rupert Grint brillant as always
April 28, 2010
I always appreciate when a film opens with a virtual guarantee of impending tragedy; Cherrybomb opens with footage of police asking two battered-looking young boys about a death, before cutting to three days earlier and telling the story of what exactly has happened from scratch. I like that approach a lot - the film follows two young Belfast lads (played by Rupert Grint and Robert Sheehan) in their misguided attempts to impress a girl (Kimberly Nixon) and it's the sort of thing I might have found deeply irritating had I not known from the start that it doesn't end well. This probably says something bad about me.

Cherrybomb is essentially a drama about what it means to be young and directionless, hiding your own fears about the future and your place in it beneath a veil of affected boredom, low-key rebellion and aimless randiness. On that front it's moderately successful - the characters are surprisingly well-drawn, the cast do good work (particularly Sheehan) and there's a refreshingly honest thread running throughout the film about how opressive families can be, even the "normal" ones - Malachy is every bit as cowed by the simple fact of a congratulatory dinner with his family celebrating his GCSE results as Luke is by his brother's physical abuse of his drunken father, or Michelle by her father's shagging of one of her best mates. The film manages a hat-trick of three good character studies - no mean feat for a fairly modest "yoof" drama.

Less successful is the film's attempt to pack an emotional punch into its final act. I think the problem is that if you're going to foreshadow the tragedy from the very start, you need to make doubly sure that when it happens, it's extra horrible. What happens at the end of Cherrybomb isn't quite as bad as what I thought was going to happen, and being let off so lightly meant caring less than I should have. I like my tragedy extra-tragic. I like my horrible goings-on painful and slow. This, too, probably says something bad about me.
½ April 23, 2010
Grint proves here that he's not just a good comedic actor but a good dramatic one too. I liked this movie better than Driving Lessons.
Page 1 of 1