Crime After Crime Reviews

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Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
July 11, 2011
"Crime after Crime" is an informative, incisive and emotional documentary about Deborah Peagler who was convicted and sentenced to 25 years to life along with an accomplice for the murder of Oliver Wilson in 1983. When, as a teenager, she first met him, she found him charming but this was before he started pimping her out and abusing her. This was also at a time when women's shelters and similar programs were in their infancy. By 2002, California became the only state to allow new evidence of abuse to be allowed to mitigate old cases and reduce sentences.(By one count, 80% of women in prison are survivors of rape and/or abuse.) At that time, two land use lawyers, Nadia Costa and Joshua Safran, took up her case pro bono to try to secure Deborah's release.

While "Crime after Crime" occasionally goes off subject(but never to the point where the lawyers become more important than Deborah), the marathon metaphor turns out to be tragically apt as the case takes on more than its share of twists.(As Joshua puts it, God works in mysterious ways. And Kafka wrote non-fiction.) The documentary not only does an excellent job of untangling Deborah's case but also explores some of the conditions in prison. But unlike prisoners, prosecutors are not made to publicly repent past misdeeds and mistakes.
October 12, 2014
It's really disheartening that so many people are in jail because they had to protect themselves from serious abuse. This is one woman's story of serving her time for a murder she was involved in (i.e.,the murder of her abuser), and then an attempt to get her out of a life sentence she didn't deserve. The best part is actually that Steve Cooley, the attorney general who knew of her abuse and kept her in jail anyway, was not re-elected.
November 19, 2013
It's no wonder so many young people hate upper class people in charge and distrust them. This is one of the more shameful things I have ever seen done to a poor person of any race, but so often poor black people get the shaft. This show was infuriating and heartbreaking at the same time, and bless those attorneys who help these people get the justice they so deserve.
October 17, 2013
After watching this movie I find it very hard to hold back the tears...I really enjoy this film...
½ September 12, 2013
What about the other daughter?.. Anyway, great doc!
March 29, 2012
One of the best documentary of all times. It is a heartbreaking, incisive, and warm portrayal of Deborah Peagler. It also chronicles the corrupt, criminal justice system in LA County.
August 8, 2011
An extraordinary documentary that greatly details the failure of the California justice system as well as the outstanding efforts of two attorneys to right the wrong surrounding Deborah Peagler's incarceration.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
July 11, 2011
"Crime after Crime" is an informative, incisive and emotional documentary about Deborah Peagler who was convicted and sentenced to 25 years to life along with an accomplice for the murder of Oliver Wilson in 1983. When, as a teenager, she first met him, she found him charming but this was before he started pimping her out and abusing her. This was also at a time when women's shelters and similar programs were in their infancy. By 2002, California became the only state to allow new evidence of abuse to be allowed to mitigate old cases and reduce sentences.(By one count, 80% of women in prison are survivors of rape and/or abuse.) At that time, two land use lawyers, Nadia Costa and Joshua Safran, took up her case pro bono to try to secure Deborah's release.

While "Crime after Crime" occasionally goes off subject(but never to the point where the lawyers become more important than Deborah), the marathon metaphor turns out to be tragically apt as the case takes on more than its share of twists.(As Joshua puts it, God works in mysterious ways. And Kafka wrote non-fiction.) The documentary not only does an excellent job of untangling Deborah's case but also explores some of the conditions in prison. But unlike prisoners, prosecutors are not made to publicly repent past misdeeds and mistakes.
June 29, 2011
Amazing story of courage...and great music too!
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