Crossfire Hurricane Reviews

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Rod Lockwood
Toledo Blade
May 31, 2013
If you're expecting a comprehensive chronological cataloging of the Stones and all their exploits, prepare to be sorely disappointed.
Top Critic
Roger Catlin
Salon.com
November 16, 2012
While there is always another clip or song of interest, there's a lot lost in the middle.
Jack Jones
Little White Lies
October 24, 2012
Stones completists may feel sated, but the idly inquisitive would do best to steer clear.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
Top Critic
James Poniewozik
TIME Magazine
November 16, 2012
It's not a revelation, but it's an intimate story of the band, with performance sequences that show how five guys-in different lineups -- came together and made an entity of pure fire and sex.
November 16, 2012
If Crossfire Hurricane doesn't offer much that's new, or tell a spellbinding story along the way, it still vividly captures how they became legends in the first place.
Full Review | Original Score: B+
Top Critic
Joanne Ostrow
Denver Post
November 12, 2012
True, it's a self-promotional exercise designed to coincide with a new greatest-hits album and featuring the band's closest participation in a documentary ever, but it's still fun to recap.
Michael Hann
Guardian
October 18, 2012
In its own way, Crossfire Hurricane is just like one of those Stones albums of the last three decades: it's fun, it has terrific moments, but in the end it pales in comparison with earlier triumphs.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Emma Simmonds
The List
October 24, 2012
Ultimately, by focusing on energetically edited footage of Stones at their musical peak, Morgen has made an immersive documentary that thoroughly entertains yet neglects to sufficiently enlighten.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Rebecca Barry
Flicks.co.nz
November 29, 2012
Hammers home [the Stones'] amazing, timeless appeal.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Ed Gibbs
Empire Magazine Australasia
October 23, 2012
Nothing terribly new, but great fun, all the same. Morgan has assembled a hugely enjoyable, tightly edited journey through the Stones' creative heyday.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Top Critic
David Hinckley
New York Daily News
November 16, 2012
Crossfire Hurricane, a new documentary on the first 15 years of the Rolling Stones, has passages where it lives up to the title's promise. It has other passages where it's more like a mild breeze.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
David Hiltbrand
Philadelphia Inquirer
November 16, 2012
As the band marks its 50th anniversary, Crossfire Hurricane is a vivid reminder of just how essential, influential, and deliberate they have been.
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Glenn Gamboa
Newsday
November 16, 2012
Mick Jagger and Keith Richards aren't afraid to keep it real. Both show some interesting insights into their success, with Jagger revealing how he portrays a different character for each of the band's singles.
Full Review | Original Score: B
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Peter Howell
Toronto Star
November 7, 2012
Morgen and his editors do more than just provide a potted history. The fast cuts, which remind me of Arthur Lipsett's avant-garde NFB work, give the feeling of the whirlwind popularity of the band's early years.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Rich Cline
Contactmusic.com
October 19, 2012
Watching the Rolling Stones' home movies while they reminisce on the soundtrack is thoroughly entertaining, although this documentary is such an inside job that it doesn't really tell us anything we don't already know.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
John Anderson
Wall Street Journal
November 16, 2012
What Mr. Morgen is after is something true to the Stones as they once existed -- as the anti-Beatles, the antiheroes of the British Invasion and an entity that bespoke hedonism, nihilism and narrow escapes.
Top Critic
November 16, 2012
It was my pleasure, as an intermediate-level Stones buff, to see that director Brett Morgen has put together something reeking of astringent danger.
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Stephen Dalton
Hollywood Reporter
October 18, 2012
Fortunately, these Mount Rushmore-faced rock icons still have sufficiently supercharged charisma and brilliant music to carry off such a transparently commercial exercise in self-promotion.
Top Critic
David Wiegand
San Francisco Chronicle
November 16, 2012
Hurricane is a whirling impressionistic painting of the band, beautifully conveying the energy, drive and genius of the Stones, more or less chronologically within the basic flashback structure.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Robert Lloyd
Los Angeles Times
November 16, 2012
he music, at least, has remained unruly. They may be an institution, but they remain just crummy enough to keep from ever seeming slick.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
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