Paul Giamatti on Working with Rob Zombie

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While discussing his next movie with CS.net, M. Night Shyamalan's "Lady in the Water," Paul Giamatti briefly side-tracked into talking about his upcoming role in Rob Zombie's "adult" cartoon "The Haunted World of El Superbeasto" -- and it sounds pretty wild.

Courtesy of ComingSoon.net: "Giamatti's next animated movie most definitely won't be for kids, though, as he plays the bad guy in "The Haunted World of El-Superbeasto," an idea conceptualized by Rob Zombie, the man behind "The Devil's Rejects." "It's basically a very dirty cartoon," Giamatti told ComingSoon.net while in New York. "It's just a lot of sex and drugs and violence, which is good, because I think we need a cartoon like that. It's like those '70s cartoons like "Fritz the Cat" and stuff like that. I play this guy called Dr. Satan, who is trying to take over the world and may be gay or something. I don't know."

"I did get to interact [with others] which is interesting because I don't usually get to do that in cartoons," he said when asked how it differed from other animated features he's voiced. "I think [Rob] wants that feeling of people screwing around together in this movie a little bit. It has a real snarky feel to it, like a bunch of guys making dirty jokes. I worked with this guy Tom Poppa who's one of the writers, he's a comedian, and he does the voice of El Super-Beasto, the Mexican wrestler in it. He's a detective, who's one of those masked Mexican wrestlers, and he goes around doing drugs and shooting and screwing people."

"But [Rob Zombie] was great, and he's a really smart guy, and the script is very funny, so we had a good time doing it," he continued. "That was the most fun I had doing one of those kinds of things. He wants a theatrical release. It's an unusual thing because someone hasn't done it in a long time: a dirty feature cartoon like that."

Rob Zombie is, of course, the rocker-turned-director of titles like "House of 1000 Corpses" and "The Devil's Rejects." October '07 will see his take on John Carpenter's "Halloween."

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