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The Executioner's Song Reviews

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TonyPolito
August 22, 2010
What seems to circulating in rental is the 135 minute 2008 Director's Cut release. Despite statements elsewhere to the contrary, it does NOT contain the significant full-frontal work by then-23-year-old Rosanna Arquette that appeared in the European release. Rather, verbal obscenities and explicit violence form the minor amount of incremental content.

A true-crime sleeper that provokes much contemplation in the more intellectual viewer. Norman Mailer's 1979 best-seller novel earned a Pulitzer plus a screenplay Emmy nod, Rosanna Arquette earned a Emmy nod and Tommy Lee Jones took home an Emmy for this portrayal of murderer Gary Gilmore, who demanded his own execution and so marked the turning away of the American legal system from capital punishment as cruel and unusual.

Gilmore arrives in Utah paroled into the custody of his cousin (Lathi). Institutionalized by juvenile detention and adult incarceration, he is unable to adapt to freedom's smallest challenges.

He finds his angel in Arquette, who's also been unable to pull herself above the sorriest station in society and/or her lifetime of miseries. Together they form a dysfunctional life raft on the mere fact each now has someone that doesn't entirely victimize them.

Unable to cope, Gilmore quickly turns back to his life of petty crime. When convicted of murder, Gilmore's suddenly at the center of the battle for/against capital punishment and associated media sensationalism. Jones and Arquette, on the foundation of Mailer's meticulous research, develop ever-richer and more complex characterizations as the film progresses.

The duo are pathetic yet admirable, hopelessly adrift yet standing tall as true individualists, deserving of their due yet clearly were entitled to a better chance at some decent life ? rather than the life the world had imposed upon them.

RECOMMENDATION: Ignoring any issue that the film lionizes a killer, the film's recommended on the basis of its factual storyline, rich characters and solid acting.
April 6, 2009
pretty good movie true story I once worked for Spencer MaGrath,1988-1990 Gilmore's boss. Kinda spooky to hear the real stories
ohone1
March 16, 2008
Sure would like to find the uncut version of this movie. Saw it when it was new. Bought it awhile back and some of the best parts were cut out. First time I ever saw Rosanna.
December 4, 2013
I feel like I would have appreciated this film more if I had watched it in 1982 instead of 2013. Nevertheless, it's story is interesting. Gary Gilmore had a chance at a life outside of bars but throughout the film we see how he struggles. His relationship with Nicole shows that his personality can be both charming and abrasive. He seems to have little regret for his murders which lessens any sympathy we might of felt for him. All in all the film is an excellent commentary on the death penalty at that time
Sandman1968
September 9, 2012
Compared to other infamous serial killers, Gary Gilmore's crimes weren't particularly heinous or depraved. What made his case special is that he fought for the right to die, but unfortunately, that part of the story makes up only a small portion of "The Executioner's Song". It's the film adaptation of Norman mailer's Pulitzer Prize winning true crime novel, and far too much time is spent on Gilmore's life before the murders. Frankly, that's the least interesting aspect of the story.

His relationship with Nicole Baker isn't particularly fresh or involving, even though both actors involved give riveting performances. Tommy Lee Jones is perfectly cast in the lead role, earning the Emmy he won in one of his first major roles. Young Rosanna Arquette is equal to him, walking a fine line as someone you sympathize with for being a victim and yet is also quite contemptible when it's made apparent that her love for Jones is unwavering.

Gimore became the first man to be executed in this country after the Death Penalty was reinstated, but that is never fleshed out either. It's also interesting to see him become the victim our of government's legendary bureaucratic red tape when, after being sentenced to die, the state of Utah seems reluctant to carry out the sentence, despite the insistence of Gilmore himself. It seems to me that the real story of "The Executioner's Song" lies there, not in the mostly trivial details that permeate the first two-thirds of the film. It's a good movie that should have achieved greatness.
September 4, 2012
I'm not a huge Tommy Lee Jones fan, and usually apathetic about crime films but his performance as killer Gary Gilmore was excellent and the movie was better than average. He portrayed Gilmore as a smart, somewhat sensitive killer that lived too close to the emotional precipice of life and as such, it didn't take much for him to lose it (all). As played by Tommy Lee, Gilmore seemed to posses some kind of perverse integrity which in a very twisted way led him to commit the killings he did and later, to demand that his own death penalty be carried out on schedule.
August 18, 2012
This is one of the best made for t.v. movies i've seen
June 3, 2012
TV MOVIE. Tommy Lee Jones is at his best! A man uncomfortable in his own skin. Very good film! NBC 11/28/29/1982
May 10, 2012
Great story, but felt like the original TV version due to the lower quality production.
Kyle f73
May 6, 2012
Excellent adaptation of Norman Mailer's Pulitzer Prize winning book.
December 9, 2011
Very good movie, and how about that Rosanna Arquette.
Jonny B

Super Reviewer

June 3, 2011
I loved Norman Mailers book and the television adaption, which he wrote the screenplay for, is pretty tremendous for a television film. It speaks on the death penalty, maybe if the public saw how brutal capital punishment is they wouldn't support it, and this film does a decent job at bringing that idea up. Jones is great as Gilmore, stunningly making the viewer almost feel empathy for the guy who has been ruined by the broken prison system and is released into public, and it helps that despite his actions Gilmore does take full responsibility and utters the infamous line 'Let's do this'. Gilmore's story is more complex than a TV movie can show, or his legacy at least, as his call for death did help bring back the death penalty and as a result countless innocent people have been murdered by their own government there to 'protect' them and give them 'justice'. Overall an excellent film with intriguing writing and performances and quality photography from Francis.
gillianren
October 8, 2010
The Real Horror of the '70s--Burnt Orange

I have kind of a hard time looking at Tommy Lee Jones as a character sometimes, because I know too much about Tommy Lee Jones the man. Like I know, when I get around to [i]Unaccompanied Minors[/i] (probably come Christmas), one of my problems with it will be that it's Dyllan, and I was at his parents' wedding and his mother's baby shower. Indeed, I remember his grandmother's celebration that his father was no longer a teenager. So. The point here is that, while watching this, I could not but flash back to the 2000 Democratic National Convention. Tommy Lee Jones stood there, telling us the story about the time he and his roommate, and his roommate's girlfriend, roasted their Thanksgiving turkey in the fireplace of their Harvard dorm room. This was relevant because said roommate and said roommate's girlfriend were Al and Tipper Gore. The Democrats clearly felt that, if you can get Tommy Lee Jones to introduce your candidate and tell charming, folksy stories, have at.

Here, Jones is Gary Gilmore. Gilmore is a cheap hood. He served twelve years for robbery. His cousin, Brenda (Christine Lahti), has agreed to have him brought to Utah to stay with her and look for work. She gets him work with Uncle Vern Damico (Eli Wallach), who runs a shoe repair shop. Only he's no good at that, and he's no good at living in the world Outside. Arguably, he's just generally no good. And then he hooks up with Nicole Baker (Rosanna Arquette), who is young and kind of trashy. Or, you know, really trashy. She has two children already at the age of nineteen. She's already widowed; she speaks at one point of a second marriage. She and Gary have a stormy relationship. Gilmore doesn't know how to get by, and he ends up murdering a couple of people for no reason during robberies. The last of the movie concerns Gary's execution, the first one after the Supreme Court reversed its ban. Gilmore just gave up, you see, and didn't want to live anymore.

The colour palette of the '70s really started to bother me about the whole thing. Especially in contrast with the wild patterns and designs. Yes, there is incredible paisley, but it was also the era of avocado appliances. We just moved out of an apartment with the original stove (the complex was built in '79, I believe), and it was an unpleasant shade of mustard. Chocolate brown was also popular. I guess they were in theory earth tones, but they were unnatural ones. Even avocados don't really come in avocado. I think the difference is a richness in colour. These were just flat. Not dull, quite, but bleak. Of course, the whole thing is intended to be bleak. Gary Gilmore's life basically was. (And in my head, I keep getting him confused with Gary Ridgway, the Green River Killer here in Washington.) On the other hand, I have at least one picture from my parents' honeymoon, surely intended to be a joyous event, which is also pretty bleak.

A woman in seminar with me in college once weepily confessed to us that she had thrown around the phrase "poor white trash," and it was an unfair generalization, and so forth. And I certainly don't want to imply that all poor people are somehow trashy. Indeed, I think the major distinction between Gary and Brenda is that she isn't trash and can't be made to be. Not to mention that, let's face it, I am both poor and white myself. And I don't know if the real Nicole Baker was quite so skanky as the one portrayed here. However, in many ways, the Nicole Baker of the movie was the epitome of white trash. Given the ages of her children, she must have had the first one at maybe fifteen. She wears tiny little shorts and tiny little tops, and she got a tattoo--and this in 1976, when it wasn't so fashionable and common as it is today. Frankly, making Gary jealous by kissing that friend the way she did transcends class, but the way she talks and acts and thinks is pretty poor-white-trashy.

I didn't pay much attention to most of the movie. I knew the vague outlines of the story, knew that Gary would spiral into the desperation and misery with which the story ends. I hadn't realized how fast it all was, though. Gary Gilmore was released from prison and went to Provo in April of '76. He was executed in January of '77. Not even a year. There's a strong argument that our current criminal justice system breeds more criminals than it rehabilitates, and it's not a bad argument. However, it's worth noting that the men Gary Gilmore killed didn't resist him. They got him what they wanted. They could have reasonably expected to live. Under the control of nearly any other robber, they probably would have. It's implied that prison changed Gary Gilmore, and I have no doubt that it did. Anyone unchanged by prison must have been in a coma while they were there. However, I think there must have been something wrong in Gary Gilmore to begin with that the whole thing happened so fast.
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