Box Office Guru: G.I. Joe Rocks Easter Weekend

Testosterone ruled the Easter frame as the 3D action sequel G.I. Joe: Retaliation opened at number one, but Tyler Perry's latest offering Temptation also scored a strong debut of its own in third place. The animated holdover The Croods held up well in its second weekend pulling in families over the school holiday helping the box office beat Easter business from the past two years.

Paramount topped the charts with the franchise hit G.I. Joe which debuted to an estimated $41.2M over the Friday-to-Sunday period and $51.7M since its launch on Wednesday night with 7:00pm shows. The PG-13 flick averaged a muscular $11,078 from 3,719 locations over the three-day weekend period with 45% of the business coming from 3D screens including 303 IMAX sites which kicked in $4.8M.

Though definitely a strong opening, the 4.5-day figure still came in below the $54.7M three-day non-holiday opening of its 2009 predecessor G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. The first pic was released over the busier summer period in 4,000+ locations but the sequel had higher 3D prices and added starpower from Dwayne Johnson and Bruce Willis. Channing Tatum, who played a central role in the first film, had a more supporting role in the followup which was delayed from its original June 29, 2012 date.

But Retaliation should still be a big moneymaker thanks to a smaller production budget ($130M vs $175M) and substantial growth from international markets which should more than make up for domestic shortfalls allowing the new film to finish higher than Cobra's $302M global final.

Domestically, the bullet-filled action pic skewed heavily male as expected. Studio research showed that males made up 68% of the crowd while 59% were 25 or older. Reviews were weak - standard for these types of sequels - but audiences liked what they paid for as the CinemaScore grade was an encouraging A-.

Joe kicked off its run with $10.5M on Thursday, including $2.2M from Wednesday night shows. The Good Friday holiday saw sales climb 48% to $15.5M, Saturday was flat with $15.6M, and Easter Sunday is estimated to dip by 35% to $10.1M. Action sequels like these tend to be front-loaded but the domestic final should be able to break $100M and possibly end near the $110M mark. Cobra grossed $150.2M.

Retaliation really saw its good fortune from overseas markets which generated an estimated $80.3M debut resulting in a spectacular global opening of $132M this weekend. Compared to the same markets for Cobra, Retaliation's opening was nearly twice as big thanks in part to 3D prices and key markets becoming more lucrative since 2009. Russia led the way with $11M, Korea banked $6M, and Mexico scored $6M. The new Joe still has 25% of the world to come including China on April 15 and Japan on June 8 so a worldwide haul of $400M is possible.

Families flocked to the animated comedy The Croods over the Easter school holidays as the DreamWorks pic grossed an estimated $26.5M, sliding 39% in its second weekend. Compared to other spring toons with the bunny holiday helping the sophomore frame, the pre-historic family dropped a little harder than 2011's Rio (33%) and 2010's How To Train Your Dragon (34%), but fell a little less than 2008's Horton Hears a Who (45%).

With a sturdy $88.6M in ten days, Croods should be able to keep its momentum going for weeks to come since there are absolutely no kidpics with G or PG ratings opening for nearly two months. A final domestic tally of about $160M could result making it the best performance for a DreamWorks Animation non-sequel since Dragon. Overseas, Croods used the holiday to bank a sizable $52.5M from 59 markets shooting the international total to $230M. Global is $296.6M and will smash $300M on Monday.

The Tyler Perry brand showed off its strength and durability with the impressive debut of the infidelity drama Temptation which opened to an estimated $22.3M from 2,047 theaters for a stellar $10,894 average. That was almost identical to G.I. Joe's average. Rated PG-13, Temptation delivered the best opening ever for a Perry film that wasn't a sequel or featured his signature Madea character. Plus it was the tenth Tyler Perry film (ninth as director) over eight years to debut north of $20M. Despite having so much content, the filmmaker's fans continue to come out and spend on his new offerings.

Temptation was positioned a bit more as an erotic thriller which made it look like something a bit different. The audience breakdown was similar to past films from the mogul - 70% female and 79% 25 and older. Easter has been used successfully many times in the past to launch new Perry films and it worked for Lionsgate yet again as the fan base came out in better than expected numbers. The gross even doubled the opening of last fall's Alex Cross which featured Perry as just an actor and in the title role. The CinemaScore was an A- and Perry's fourteen films over the past eight years have now grossed a stunning $696M domestically with all carrying modest budgets.

The White House kidnapping thriller Olympus Has Fallen dropped a large 54% thanks in part to a new action tentpole hitting the marketplace. Gerard Butler's hit film grossed an estimated $14M raising the ten-day total to a sturdy $54.7M for FilmDistrct heading to an impressive final in the $85M vicinity. Flirting with the double century mark, Disney's Oz the Great and Powerful took in an estimated $11.6M on Easter weekend, down 46%, for a $198.3M domestic total. Thanks to a new opening in China (official figures not yet released, but estimated to be near $10M over three days), the franchise flick grossed an estimated $22.2M from overseas markets boosting the international cume to $214M and the worldwide haul to $412.3M on its way to the $500M mark.

The critically-panned sci-fi romance The Host failed to pull in business from Twilight fans and finished outside the top five in sixth place with an estimated $11M. Averaging a dull $3,436 from an aggressive release in 3,202 locations, the PG-13 pic was based on the best-selling book by author Stephenie Meyer which followed her mega-successful vampire saga. Critics trashed the Open Road release and fans decided to skip this one. The target audience consisted of young females and its B- CinemaScore indicated not much satisfaction from those ticket buyers that did come out.

The Halle Berry hit The Call dropped 46% to an estimated $4.8M giving Sony $39.5M to date. Tina Fey followed with a similar 47% decline for her new comedy Admission which grossed an estimated $3.3M putting Focus at a disappointing $11.8M.

The bikini-girls-with-guns pic Spring Breakers ranked ninth with an estimated $2.8M, off 43%, and a modest $10.1M overall for A24. Tumbling 70% in its third round was the all-star comedy flop The Incredible Burt Wonderstone which collected an estimated $1.3M. Warner Bros. has taken in a weak $20.6M and won't finish with much more.

After being MIA for a year and a half, red hot actor Ryan Gosling returned to the big screen in the platform release The Place Beyond The Pines along with co-star Bradley Cooper and found sensational results with an estimated $270,000 opening from just four theaters for a scorching $67,546 average. Focus will expand beyond New York and Los Angeles next weekend with 13 additional markets and will go nationwide on April 12. The R-rated drama earned good reviews from critics.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $138.7M which was up 20% from last year's Easter frame when The Hunger Games stayed at number one for a third time with $33.1M; and up 21% from 2011's holiday when Rio remained in the top spot with $26.3M in its sophomore session.

Follow Gitesh on Twitter!

Comments

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

I was right, The Host did bomb.

Mar 31 - 04:45 PM

Kyle McLarty

Kyle McLarty

we got a genius over here

Mar 31 - 10:39 PM

Dave J

Dave J

Looks like there isn't going to be a sequel either, but I will say that Saoirse Ronan is a far better actress than Kristen Stewart!

Apr 2 - 12:32 PM

SecondBest

This Guy

G.I. Joe was dumb fun...it was worth the 6.50 that I paid for admission. Hope it does well.

Mar 31 - 04:46 PM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

So you saw Admission and G.I Joe?

Mar 31 - 06:33 PM

SecondBest

This Guy

sorry I meant admission to the theater

Mar 31 - 07:51 PM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

I know I just made that into a joke :)

Mar 31 - 08:49 PM

James B.

James Bradford

DUMB FUN! ME LIKE DUMB FUN!

Apr 1 - 06:35 AM

Tony Stark

sam varma

strongly agree...really worth the money! i liked it better than oz and jack! it was awesome...most people love this film but try to hide it as they think its immature to do so

Apr 1 - 08:37 AM

James B.

James Bradford

"most people love this film but try to hide it as they think its immature to do so"
So, you took a random poll of "most people"?

Apr 1 - 01:46 PM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

Most people didn't see this movie.

Apr 1 - 02:13 PM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

Most people don't even want to see this movie.

Apr 2 - 09:03 AM

This comment has been removed.

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Are you talking about "Pines"? You think only people in LA and NYC are excited to see that movie, or worse, that it's some kind of fraud that people only spend money to see to be part of some club?

Perhaps larger cities simply have more diversified tastes compared to the more homogenous mainstream multiplex entertainment. But despite the "Avengers" earning a cold bill and a half, you still get annoyed because you have to read how smaller films in limited platform are being enjoyed by people you don't respect enough to grant the sincerity of their interests. Basically, get over it. Lots of different movies for everyone, and if you read about movies, you'll have to read about some movies you don't care about. For example, I won't even complain about reading about "GI Joe". It just goes with the territory.

Mar 31 - 05:54 PM

This comment has been removed.

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Again, you don't seem to have a broader sense of the variety of films we're talking about. Your "metrics" seem entirely serviced to your examples of "Avatar" and "Indiana Jones" - crowd-pleasing blockbusters. Not every film is going to be a crowd-pleasing blockbuster, but films like last year's limited release successes, "Master" and "Moonrise Kingdom", both of which earned 6 figures per-screen averages, appeal to audiences who tend to be more literate, cosmopolitan, and culturally experienced - as in the kind of people who prefer the cultural pace of the city as opposed to the strip mall.

This is your hate. Why exactly do you "hate" reading about films that are successful in packing in the art-houses? Because the audience fits your category of elitist, intellectual art-sophisticates that is the true aim of your scorn. The most intelligent films will not be appreciated uniformly, and this is why what packs the house at Alamo Drafthouse will not pack just any suburban multiplex. Yet you seem to suspect that these art-houses are up to something. Something that you're afraid may be over the head of the rest of pop culture America.

Mar 31 - 09:36 PM

King  S.

King Simba

I think Lance's point is that scoring a high per theater average in a few theaters is no indication on how well a film is going to do in the long run. Some films started off strong in limited release and continued their success when they expanded wide (Silver Linnings Playbook), while other films would do fantastic buisness in a few theaters only to struggle as soon as they went wide (The Master).

Apr 1 - 06:43 AM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

My point is that different films require different criteria in terms of success. Smaller, "artier" films will doubtlessly do better in jam-packed art houses, so I don't see the confusion when this doesn't translate to more mainstream platforms. "SLP" is also a crowd-pleaser in many ways. It's fine that these films get the recognition that they deserve. I don't see why it's so abrasive to Biggie to have to read about films (and "Pines" is the only limited release to have its per-screen average mentioned this week - hence my inference) that happen to have these smaller noble triumphs.

Apr 1 - 01:24 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

As you often do your incorrectly reading a statement, making gross assumptions and going off on a tangent. King Simba clearly got what was being said. Never do I say I hate reading about small art house movies, what I hate is the way we're talking about them. I have no issue with small movies being discussed. My point which you seem to have missed in your defense of an argument that was never made is that it's pointless to say "This movie did stellar numbers in 2 theaters". Talk about the tomato meter, talk about past films from the people involved, talk about anything meaningful about the movie, I just don't see the point of holding up the BO based on single theaters in NY and LA because it means next to nothing. I also appreciate how you chastise me for judging arthouse people while doing the same thing from the other end of the spectrum, that was a nice touch. Just FYI in case you were suggesting I'm not "literate, cosmopolitan, and culturally experienced" I read about 3/4 books a month and have since I was 12, I'm currently living in Tokyo and have been to more than 40 countries and lived in the UK and Japan, so I would suggest I'm as literate, cosmopolitan and culturally aware as most people. I just don't happen to think that intelligent films have to alienate people to the extent that they can't be financially successful. I dislike the modern notion that art is for a small amount of people. I think the best art is self-evident even to the most pedestrian eye. That said, I don't disagree with you at all that these movie's have their place or begrudge people whose taste's and opinions don't match up with mine their pleasures. I simply take issue with a statistic being thrown out like limited release BO. I think people who enjoy smaller art house movies are usually the first to tell you BO is not the first thing they look for in terms of quality and as I and Simba mentioned it's not a reliable indicator of quality or future success, so why throw it out there as if it's important? Perhaps do another weekly article specifically for limited release art house features which offers more meaningful insight might be a good idea for RT to consider.

Apr 1 - 04:30 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Spare me the "gross assumption" talk. It speaks for itself. In an article where the 16th paragraph mentions the box office of the limited release of "Pines", you bothered to voice your disdain to reading about the "lauding" of these results. Your focus was on this caboose of information tagged onto an otherwise mainstream assessment of BO tallies. It must have been quite an obstacle to bother mentioning it at all, huh? But, yeah, it is adorable that you read 3/4ths of a book a month though.

Apr 1 - 05:41 PM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

I'd like to also point out that just because a movie is aimed at the intelligent, it doesn't mean it IS intelligent. I find most art house films to be pretentious bores and the people who watch them thinking they are superior because they 'get it'. Newsflash, we uncultured folks get it too - we just don't fucking like it.

Apr 1 - 06:52 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

Sorry for reading the whole article JJ, you'll notice I never once mentioned Pines in my post. It's adorable that you clearly don't understand an assumption or lack the ability to acknowledge that you made one.

Apr 1 - 08:19 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

What other "limited results" film is there? Is there another film that only played in LA and NYC this week? Oh, I never specifically mentioned "Pines". Even though I described it exactly. Wahhh!

Apr 1 - 08:45 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

The Pines section inspired it, but it was a general statement about limited results films, the fact that it happened the week Pines came out was incidental. Pines actually sounds like an excellent movie to me, but that fact doesn't alleviate the fact that it's BO performance in NY and LA is meaningless or that a far inferior film could have put up virtually identical or superior numbers based on these extremely limited results.

Apr 2 - 03:50 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan



67 thousand per screen is pretty great, and I don't believe that a far inferior film could put up virtually identical or superior numbers. Examples please? The best you can do is denigrate this accomplishment, because you've already expressed that you don't respect it. But regardless of whatever cultural bias or resentment you harbor, New York and Los Angeles are the media centers of America, and when there's excitement in these cities, that means that these are films worth paying attention to.

Apr 2 - 04:18 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

Sleepwalk with Me, which I admit I haven't seen because, well, no one has scored a 65,000 debut in NY and SF I think and ended up with a massive total gross of less than 5 mil with an 83% T-meter which is good, but not phenomenal. Like crazy put up similar numbers at 73% T-Meter, Best recent example I can think of off the top of my head was Obama's America which enjoyed a huge limited debut and grossed a ton of money with a 20 something T-Meter. Woody Allen's entire career most recently To Rome with Love runs the gamut from spectacular (Annie Hall) to middling (To Rome with Love) to piss more (Scoop). All adored in NY/LA regardless. Also, it's not just a dig at NY and LA, they just happen to be the places that most often get limited/platform releases. I'd say the same thing if it was Ithica, SF, Dallas or Kenosha.

Apr 3 - 04:31 PM

Brad and Netflix

Bradly Martin

Spring Breakers had a pfffft wide release too however it's a respectable film given the CHEEEAAAP Budget.

Apr 1 - 07:39 AM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Are you talking about "Pines"? You think only people in LA and NYC are excited to see that movie, or worse, that it's some kind of fraud that people only spend money to see to be part of some club?

Perhaps larger cities simply have more diversified tastes compared to the more homogenous mainstream multiplex entertainment. But despite the "Avengers" earning a cold bill and a half, you still get annoyed because you have to read how smaller films in limited platform are being enjoyed by people you don't respect enough to grant the sincerity of their interests. Basically, get over it. Lots of different movies for everyone, and if you read about movies, you'll have to read about some movies you don't care about. For example, I won't even complain about reading about "GI Joe". It just goes with the territory.

Mar 31 - 05:54 PM

This comment has been removed.

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Again, you don't seem to have a broader sense of the variety of films we're talking about. Your "metrics" seem entirely serviced to your examples of "Avatar" and "Indiana Jones" - crowd-pleasing blockbusters. Not every film is going to be a crowd-pleasing blockbuster, but films like last year's limited release successes, "Master" and "Moonrise Kingdom", both of which earned 6 figures per-screen averages, appeal to audiences who tend to be more literate, cosmopolitan, and culturally experienced - as in the kind of people who prefer the cultural pace of the city as opposed to the strip mall.

This is your hate. Why exactly do you "hate" reading about films that are successful in packing in the art-houses? Because the audience fits your category of elitist, intellectual art-sophisticates that is the true aim of your scorn. The most intelligent films will not be appreciated uniformly, and this is why what packs the house at Alamo Drafthouse will not pack just any suburban multiplex. Yet you seem to suspect that these art-houses are up to something. Something that you're afraid may be over the head of the rest of pop culture America.

Mar 31 - 09:36 PM

King  S.

King Simba

I think Lance's point is that scoring a high per theater average in a few theaters is no indication on how well a film is going to do in the long run. Some films started off strong in limited release and continued their success when they expanded wide (Silver Linnings Playbook), while other films would do fantastic buisness in a few theaters only to struggle as soon as they went wide (The Master).

Apr 1 - 06:43 AM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

My point is that different films require different criteria in terms of success. Smaller, "artier" films will doubtlessly do better in jam-packed art houses, so I don't see the confusion when this doesn't translate to more mainstream platforms. "SLP" is also a crowd-pleaser in many ways. It's fine that these films get the recognition that they deserve. I don't see why it's so abrasive to Biggie to have to read about films (and "Pines" is the only limited release to have its per-screen average mentioned this week - hence my inference) that happen to have these smaller noble triumphs.

Apr 1 - 01:24 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

As you often do your incorrectly reading a statement, making gross assumptions and going off on a tangent. King Simba clearly got what was being said. Never do I say I hate reading about small art house movies, what I hate is the way we're talking about them. I have no issue with small movies being discussed. My point which you seem to have missed in your defense of an argument that was never made is that it's pointless to say "This movie did stellar numbers in 2 theaters". Talk about the tomato meter, talk about past films from the people involved, talk about anything meaningful about the movie, I just don't see the point of holding up the BO based on single theaters in NY and LA because it means next to nothing. I also appreciate how you chastise me for judging arthouse people while doing the same thing from the other end of the spectrum, that was a nice touch. Just FYI in case you were suggesting I'm not "literate, cosmopolitan, and culturally experienced" I read about 3/4 books a month and have since I was 12, I'm currently living in Tokyo and have been to more than 40 countries and lived in the UK and Japan, so I would suggest I'm as literate, cosmopolitan and culturally aware as most people. I just don't happen to think that intelligent films have to alienate people to the extent that they can't be financially successful. I dislike the modern notion that art is for a small amount of people. I think the best art is self-evident even to the most pedestrian eye. That said, I don't disagree with you at all that these movie's have their place or begrudge people whose taste's and opinions don't match up with mine their pleasures. I simply take issue with a statistic being thrown out like limited release BO. I think people who enjoy smaller art house movies are usually the first to tell you BO is not the first thing they look for in terms of quality and as I and Simba mentioned it's not a reliable indicator of quality or future success, so why throw it out there as if it's important? Perhaps do another weekly article specifically for limited release art house features which offers more meaningful insight might be a good idea for RT to consider.

Apr 1 - 04:30 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Spare me the "gross assumption" talk. It speaks for itself. In an article where the 16th paragraph mentions the box office of the limited release of "Pines", you bothered to voice your disdain to reading about the "lauding" of these results. Your focus was on this caboose of information tagged onto an otherwise mainstream assessment of BO tallies. It must have been quite an obstacle to bother mentioning it at all, huh? But, yeah, it is adorable that you read 3/4ths of a book a month though.

Apr 1 - 05:41 PM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

I'd like to also point out that just because a movie is aimed at the intelligent, it doesn't mean it IS intelligent. I find most art house films to be pretentious bores and the people who watch them thinking they are superior because they 'get it'. Newsflash, we uncultured folks get it too - we just don't fucking like it.

Apr 1 - 06:52 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

Sorry for reading the whole article JJ, you'll notice I never once mentioned Pines in my post. It's adorable that you clearly don't understand an assumption or lack the ability to acknowledge that you made one.

Apr 1 - 08:19 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

What other "limited results" film is there? Is there another film that only played in LA and NYC this week? Oh, I never specifically mentioned "Pines". Even though I described it exactly. Wahhh!

Apr 1 - 08:45 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

The Pines section inspired it, but it was a general statement about limited results films, the fact that it happened the week Pines came out was incidental. Pines actually sounds like an excellent movie to me, but that fact doesn't alleviate the fact that it's BO performance in NY and LA is meaningless or that a far inferior film could have put up virtually identical or superior numbers based on these extremely limited results.

Apr 2 - 03:50 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan



67 thousand per screen is pretty great, and I don't believe that a far inferior film could put up virtually identical or superior numbers. Examples please? The best you can do is denigrate this accomplishment, because you've already expressed that you don't respect it. But regardless of whatever cultural bias or resentment you harbor, New York and Los Angeles are the media centers of America, and when there's excitement in these cities, that means that these are films worth paying attention to.

Apr 2 - 04:18 PM

Bigbrother

Big Brother

Sleepwalk with Me, which I admit I haven't seen because, well, no one has scored a 65,000 debut in NY and SF I think and ended up with a massive total gross of less than 5 mil with an 83% T-meter which is good, but not phenomenal. Like crazy put up similar numbers at 73% T-Meter, Best recent example I can think of off the top of my head was Obama's America which enjoyed a huge limited debut and grossed a ton of money with a 20 something T-Meter. Woody Allen's entire career most recently To Rome with Love runs the gamut from spectacular (Annie Hall) to middling (To Rome with Love) to piss more (Scoop). All adored in NY/LA regardless. Also, it's not just a dig at NY and LA, they just happen to be the places that most often get limited/platform releases. I'd say the same thing if it was Ithica, SF, Dallas or Kenosha.

Apr 3 - 04:31 PM

King Crunk

King Crunk

Need to see The Place Beyond the Pines ASAP. Now if only Refn would finally give us a trailer for Only God Forgives...

Mar 31 - 05:54 PM

Daniel Irwin

Daniel Irwin

Let alone a US release?

Mar 31 - 07:02 PM

King Crunk

King Crunk

It has not been 100% confirmed, but pretty much everything Refn and others associated with the production have said has been pointing to a debut at Cannes in May, with a May 27 theatrical release.

Mar 31 - 07:19 PM

Dave J

Dave J

"The Place Beyond the Pines" is limited release this week but could be wide release next week!

Apr 2 - 12:35 PM

Michael Kehoe

Michael Kehoe

I guess Tyler Perry can throw just about anything up on the screen and it makes money...

Mar 31 - 06:00 PM

Dave J

Dave J

He does have a serious comedy fan base!

Apr 2 - 12:24 PM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

Wall to wall junk, this week was just for people who go to the movies just to go out. I do sometimes, but man are the pickings slim.

Mar 31 - 06:24 PM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

So you saw Admission and G.I Joe?

Mar 31 - 06:33 PM

SecondBest

This Guy

sorry I meant admission to the theater

Mar 31 - 07:51 PM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

I know I just made that into a joke :)

Mar 31 - 08:49 PM

Daniel Irwin

Daniel Irwin

Let alone a US release?

Mar 31 - 07:02 PM

King Crunk

King Crunk

It has not been 100% confirmed, but pretty much everything Refn and others associated with the production have said has been pointing to a debut at Cannes in May, with a May 27 theatrical release.

Mar 31 - 07:19 PM

King Crunk

King Crunk

It has not been 100% confirmed, but pretty much everything Refn and others associated with the production have said has been pointing to a debut at Cannes in May, with a May 27 theatrical release.

Mar 31 - 07:19 PM

Jake Cecena

Jake Cecena

1) G.I. Joe: Retaliation - Eh, it was okay. Just big, dumb fun and nothing more.
2) The Croods - Surprisingly enjoyable. Nicolas Cage's first movie in years that didn't suck.
3) Tyler Perry's Temptation - I'd rather commit suicide than watch a film starring Kim Kartrashian.
4) Olympus Has Fallen - *Sigh* Do we really need another formulaic, ultra-patriotic action film with actors not from the U.S. as the main leads? The answer: A resounding yes (according to most American moviegoers).
5) Oz the Great and Powerful - L. Frank Baum is spinning in his grave.
6) The Host - Someone needs to stop Stephenie Meyer before she ruins the entire sci-fi/fantasy genre altogether. Oh, too late.
7) The Call - So-so first act, great second act, stupid third act.
8) Admission - No thanks.
9) Spring Breakers - A well-made indie film that'll go over most viewers' heads. Franco's performance is worth full-ticket price alone.
10) The Incredible Burt Wonderstone - How many f**king times do we have to listen to "On Top of the World" by Imagine Dragons?

Mar 31 - 07:45 PM

James B.

James Bradford

While nowhere near as good as Broadway's Wicked, Oz The Great was pretty good. I doubt Baum is "spinning in his grave." He'd probably be thrilled that his stories endure and new generations are being introduced to the world he created.

Apr 1 - 06:47 AM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

Croods was good but its crap compared to How To Train Your Dragon.

Apr 1 - 04:58 PM

SecondBest

This Guy

sorry I meant admission to the theater

Mar 31 - 07:51 PM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

I know I just made that into a joke :)

Mar 31 - 08:49 PM

Typhon

Typhon Q

If you want a good movie about things taking over peoples bodies, I'd recommend Alien.

Mar 31 - 08:20 PM

Dick Travis

Mick Travis

Or the 1956 version of INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS...

Mar 31 - 08:56 PM

David Tanny

Big Fat Jewish Guy

Wait next week for Evil Dead...

Mar 31 - 09:52 PM

infernaldude

Infernal Dude

Man, RT. It would be nice to be able to comment on the pics and trailers. But, since RT is still living in the stone age, what did everyone think of the new World War Z trailer?

Mar 31 - 08:33 PM

Dick Travis

Mick Travis

Yawn! It won't be as epic as EVIL DEAD.

Mar 31 - 08:57 PM

Brenton M.

Brenton Malnofski

I think it looks pretty bad. I just can't get past the fake-looking zombies. Removes any sense of tension or realism. I will be surprised if it gets better than lackluster responses from critics.

Mar 31 - 09:39 PM

The.Watcher

The Watcher

Yeah, the cartoon zombies look ridiculous. The movie itself seems mediocre. Shame, some scenarios in the book would have been fun to watch unfold on-screen.

Apr 1 - 04:27 AM

infernaldude

Infernal Dude

My biggest problem is Pitt. He looks bored as hell in this movie.

Apr 1 - 11:21 AM

Matthew R.

Matthew Reimer

I know I just made that into a joke :)

Mar 31 - 08:49 PM

Dick Travis

Mick Travis

Or the 1956 version of INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS...

Mar 31 - 08:56 PM

What's Hot On RT

Movies for Tax Day
Movies for Tax Day

Your tax dollars at work, in movies.

24 Frames
24 Frames

Picture gallery of movie bears

Summer Movies
Summer Movies

10 most anticipated blockbusters

<em>Mad Men</em>
Mad Men

Read reviews for Season 7 premiere

Find us on:                 
Help | About | Jobs | Critics Submission | Press | API | Licensing | Mobile