Opening

67% The Maze Runner Sep 19
65% A Walk Among the Tombstones Sep 19
46% This Is Where I Leave You Sep 19
84% Tracks Sep 19
92% The Guest Sep 17

Top Box Office

11% No Good Deed $24.3M
72% Dolphin Tale 2 $15.9M
92% Guardians of the Galaxy $8.1M
19% Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $4.9M
20% Let's Be Cops $4.4M
89% The Drop $4.1M
37% If I Stay $3.9M
36% The November Man $2.8M
33% The Giver $2.6M
67% The Hundred-Foot Journey $2.4M

Coming Soon

68% The Equalizer Sep 26
70% The Boxtrolls Sep 26
86% The Two Faces of January Sep 26
—— Two Night Stand Sep 26
91% Jimi: All Is by My Side Sep 26

New Episodes Tonight

100% Garfunkel and Oates: Season 1
—— Haven: Season 5
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
56% Married: Season 1
39% Rush: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
79% You're the Worst: Season 1

Discuss Last Night's Shows

86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
83% Extant: Season 1
—— Franklin & Bash: Season 4
—— The League: Season 6
56% Legends: Season 1
24% The Mysteries of Laura: Season 1
59% Red Band Society: Season 1

Certified Fresh TV

87% Boardwalk Empire: Season 5
86% The Bridge (FX): Season 2
91% Doctor Who: Season 8
83% Extant: Season 1
89% The Honorable Woman: Season 1
87% The Knick: Season 1
89% Manhattan: Season 1
97% Masters of Sex: Season 2
90% Outlander: Season 1
82% Satisfaction: Season 1
87% The Strain: Season 1
79% You're the Worst: Season 1

Yuke yuke nidome no shojo (Go, Go Second Time Virgin) Reviews

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Eric B

Super Reviewer

August 26, 2012
The title alone is enough to stoke anyone's curiosity. This Japanese New Wave gem doesn't quite live up to its billing, but it's smart enough to know its thin premise doesn't warrant more than 65 minutes. The script makes its statement and gets out quickly.

The story takes place almost entirely on a city rooftop. A girl is gang-raped while a mousy, enigmatic boy watches from the side. Afterwards, the two creep into a dysfunctional romance based on shared traumatic memories. But the boy holds the keys to the building, and so the whole crowd of scoundrels is also stranded on the roof for the night. The tense situation is detailed almost in real time, eventually turning violent in unexpected ways. The closing suggests the film is a tribute to the recently murdered Sharon Tate, so consider yourself warned.

"Go, Go Second Time Virgin" is dominantly black and white, but inserts a few flashbacks in color. The musical score is unusually Western-influenced and even includes an unlikely usage of the Mothers of Invention's "The Return of the Son of Monster Magnet" (wow). If you're a fan of foreign directors such as Nagisa Oshima and Jean-Luc Godard and would like to dig deeper, this is a good place to start.
Eric B

Super Reviewer

August 26, 2012
The title alone is enough to stoke anyone's curiosity. This Japanese New Wave gem doesn't quite live up to its billing, but it's smart enough to know its thin premise doesn't warrant more than 65 minutes. The script makes its statement and gets out quickly.

The story takes place almost entirely on a city rooftop. A girl is gang-raped while a mousy, enigmatic boy watches from the side. Afterwards, the two creep into a dysfunctional romance based on shared traumatic memories. But the boy holds the keys to the building, and so the whole crowd of scoundrels is also stranded on the roof for the night. The tense situation is detailed almost in real time, eventually turning violent in unexpected ways. The closing suggests the film is a tribute to the recently murdered Sharon Tate, so consider yourself warned.

"Go, Go Second Time Virgin" is dominantly black and white, but inserts a few flashbacks in color. The musical score is unusually Western-influenced and even includes an unlikely usage of the Mothers of Invention's "The Return of the Son of Monster Magnet" (wow). If you're a fan of foreign directors such as Nagisa Oshima and Jean-Luc Godard and would like to dig deeper, this is a good place to start.
Philosophe rouge
July 24, 2010
I?m not sure exactly what to make of this film, I?m barely sure if I even like it. It?s certainly a puzzling portrait of violence and unhappiness. It?s unclear how much of it is fantasy, or if any of it is. The film begins with Poppo (the Girl) being raped on a rooftop. By her own account, this is the second time this has happened, and now she wants to die. Tsukio lives in the building, and followed the other boys up to the roof and watched, though he didn?t partake. When morning comes, he tries to dissuade the girl from both killing herself, or at least from staying on the roof forever.

Though just an hour, the film is filled to the rafters. Focusing particularly on sexual trauma and fear, both characters reveal to each other their own violent and traumatic sexual experiences. They?re both quite young, teens, and do not understand the situations that surround them. When The Girl asks to die, the boy asks her why. She cannot understand, she says it isn?t because she was raped, but something else. Her answers change and shift as the film goes on, as do her recollections of her past and family. Nothing seems certain, or real. She lives in a disturb and diluted world of violence and unhappiness.

Is this film about purity? The loss of innocence? It could be. The treatment and abuse of children as sex objects. Or perhaps, their own diluted understanding of events beyond their understanding. Skewed views of events and experiences that they were simply not ready for.

The violence is greatly affecting, and really quite difficult to watch. It?s difficult for me personally to come to terms with it? obviously, it?s not meant to be enjoyed, but I want to look away and block it off. Is it an expression of male rage? The falling back on violence, and ?penetration?, a revenge in it?s purest right. The girl remains submissive, wishing away her pain through a sort of masochistic acceptance of her powerlessness. And yet, is she stronger? She does not seek revenge or violence, or in reality, she does. She gives many reasons why she wants to die, alll seem to be elusively skirting the truth, but finally she screams she wants to die because she wants to kill. A strong revelation, and one that I found to be quite powerful. She would not continue the cycle of violence, and though being completely resigned to her own destruction seems counter-intuitive, it was her way of engaging in a sort of moral pacifism that was motivated in part by fear, but more clearly by an inner strength.

The film finishes with the complete destruction of youth. There is nothing left for the characters but death.
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