Opening

—— The Identical Sep 05
—— The Longest Week Sep 05
67% Thunder and the House of Magic Sep 05
74% God Help the Girl Sep 05
—— The Remaining Sep 05

Top Box Office

92% Guardians of the Galaxy $16.3M
20% Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $11.8M
39% If I Stay $9.3M
32% As Above/So Below $8.3M
21% Let's Be Cops $8.2M
37% The November Man $7.7M
17% When The Game Stands Tall $5.6M
32% The Giver $5.3M
65% The Hundred-Foot Journey $4.6M
34% The Expendables 3 $3.5M

Coming Soon

—— No Good Deed Sep 12
—— Dolphin Tale 2 Sep 12
—— Atlas Shrugged: Who Is John Galt? Sep 12
100% The Skeleton Twins Sep 12
100% The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby Sep 12

Premieres Tonight

42% Houdini: Season 1

New Episodes Tonight

—— Anger Management: Season 2
71% Dallas: Season 3
—— Mistresses: Season 2
25% Partners: Season 1
67% Teen Wolf: Season 4
62% Under the Dome: Season 2

Discuss Last Night's Shows

—— Breathless: Season One
100% Falling Skies: Season 4
89% Manhattan: Season 1
97% Masters of Sex: Season 2
78% Ray Donovan: Season 2
46% Reckless: Season 1
87% The Strain: Season 1
—— Unforgettable: Season 2

Great Directors Reviews

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flixsterman
flixsterman

Super Reviewer

July 14, 2010
No disrespect to Anela Ismailos, but how could anyone interview the likes of David Lynch and John Sayles and Catherine Breillat and not have an interesting documentary?
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

October 20, 2012
For the record, great is too loaded a word when it comes to labeling filmmakers and is prone to cause arguments and wars. Let's just agree that the directors included in this informal documentary from Angela Ismailos are all iconoclasts, each with their own distinctive point of view. Along these same lines, the documentary is refreshingly more interested in failure than success, allowing for a clear headed discussion of politics and sex in film. If David Lynch had not failed with "Dune," then his career would have turned out very differently and the film world would be that much poorer, as he rues not having creative control on that film. The wild card here is Liliana Cavani whose films I am mostly unfamiliar with. I really liked "Ripley's Game" starring John Malkovich. Of "The Night Porter," I disagree that people disliked it because the main character is a Nazi and a villain. Rather, it is because the film is ambiguous about him in a sadomasochist kind of way. Plus, I am still not even remotely interested in seeing "The Queen."

The thing to remember here is that whenever somebody says they were the first to put something on film, somebody almost always got there before them. For example, this documentary brings up a fascinating looking 1982 documentary called "Room 666" which features interviews with directors of the time and is incredibly available on DVD. Even with the newsmagazine format of "Great Directors," Ismailos would have been better off learning something from her captivating subjects and stayed behind the camera, so as not to take away any attention from them.
July 21, 2010
It must have been a great opportunity to get to talk at length to these ten filmmakers. As a film this is nothing remarkable - in fact, it's rather frustrating because it tries to confine the interviews with the directors into some arbitrary structure (sections on politics and Hollywood, for example). I would have liked to just see the filmmakers share their views, their words not manipulated by the demands of Ismailos's structure. Cavani and Sayles, and Breillat as well, deserved more screen time than they were given.
February 18, 2014
Superb editing. Every statement from each director was fresh and flowed beautifully. I wouldn't change a thing. It has inspired me.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

October 20, 2012
For the record, great is too loaded a word when it comes to labeling filmmakers and is prone to cause arguments and wars. Let's just agree that the directors included in this informal documentary from Angela Ismailos are all iconoclasts, each with their own distinctive point of view. Along these same lines, the documentary is refreshingly more interested in failure than success, allowing for a clear headed discussion of politics and sex in film. If David Lynch had not failed with "Dune," then his career would have turned out very differently and the film world would be that much poorer, as he rues not having creative control on that film. The wild card here is Liliana Cavani whose films I am mostly unfamiliar with. I really liked "Ripley's Game" starring John Malkovich. Of "The Night Porter," I disagree that people disliked it because the main character is a Nazi and a villain. Rather, it is because the film is ambiguous about him in a sadomasochist kind of way. Plus, I am still not even remotely interested in seeing "The Queen."

The thing to remember here is that whenever somebody says they were the first to put something on film, somebody almost always got there before them. For example, this documentary brings up a fascinating looking 1982 documentary called "Room 666" which features interviews with directors of the time and is incredibly available on DVD. Even with the newsmagazine format of "Great Directors," Ismailos would have been better off learning something from her captivating subjects and stayed behind the camera, so as not to take away any attention from them.
June 3, 2012
While the directors being interviewed have really interesting things to say, Angela Ismailos is a slightly awkward interviewer, and the structure is strange with shots of her that don't really fit with the flow of the documentary. She uses some really great examples from a large number of films though. It isn't near as good as it could have been with its fantastic list of directors.
Michael H.
January 1, 2012
Some interesting comments by a variety of interesting directors but the whole thing seems kind of random and arbitrary. I suppose if I had the money to do so (as Angela Ismailos apparently does) making a film like this would be a good excuse to spend some time with people I admire.
Rodstar
February 6, 2011
Ten Great Directors, ten points of view about the comment of film on society both past and present. This engaging documentary sheds personal light on influences, studio pressures and political commentary amongst other things that will be of interest to all fans of quality cinema.
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