His Girl Friday (1940)



Critic Consensus: Anchored by stellar performances from Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell, His Girl Friday is a classic screwball romantic comedy.

Movie Info

The second screen version of the Ben Hecht/Charles MacArthur play The Front Page, His Girl Friday changed hard-driving newspaper reporter Hildy Johnson from a man to a woman, transforming the story into a scintillating battle of the sexes. Rosalind Russell plays Hildy, about to foresake journalism for marriage to cloddish Bruce Baldwin (Ralph Bellamy). Cary Grant plays Walter Burns, Hildy's editor and ex-husband, who feigns happiness about her impending marriage as a ploy to win her back. The … More

Rating: PG
Genre: Drama, Classics, Comedy
Directed By:
Written By: Charles Lederer
In Theaters:
On DVD: Dec 28, 2004
Columbia Pictures


as Walter Burns

as Hildy Johnson

as Sheriff Hartwell

as Mollie Malloy

as Bruce Baldwin

as Murphy

as Roy Bensinger

as Endicott

as Wilson

as Sanders

as Diamond Louie

as Duffy

as Earl Williams

as Mrs. Baldwin

as Joe Pettibone

as Warden Cooley

as Dr. Egelhoffer

as Mr. Davis

as Guard

as Jail Guard

as Evangeline
Show More Cast

News & Interviews for His Girl Friday

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Critic Reviews for His Girl Friday

All Critics (39) | Top Critics (5)

The movie bears reviewing because there's always something new in the confetti of one-liners, while its depiction of the Fourth Estate remains relevant.

Full Review… | December 15, 2009
Village Voice
Top Critic

Cary Grant's performance is truly virtuoso -- stunning technique applied to the most challenging material.

Full Review… | April 2, 2008
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

Casting is excellent, with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell in the top roles.

Full Review… | April 2, 2008
Top Critic

Perhaps the funniest, certainly the fastest talkie comedy ever made.

Full Review… | February 9, 2006
Time Out
Top Critic

It takes you by the scruff of the neck in the first reel and it shakes you madly, bellowing hoarsely the. while, for the remaining six or seven. Before it's over you don't know whether you have been laughing or having your ears boxed.

Full Review… | May 20, 2003
New York Times
Top Critic

It's a miraculous balancing act from Hawks, who keeps death-row drama bleeding under the movie's screwball skin to give this frantic battle of the sexes a fiendishly dark sophistication.

Full Review… | February 10, 2014
Total Film

Audience Reviews for His Girl Friday

I guess the term "screwball" couldn't be more well illustrated than by this laugh-out-loud comedy that has its characters shooting their overlapping lines in an insanely frenetic rhythm, with Grant and Russell simply hilarious and displaying an enormous chemistry together.

Carlos Magalh„es

Super Reviewer

Was told it's a classic...and, yeah, I guess I can see why. However, I do think this one is quite overrated.

Or maybe I'm just not a massive fan of screwball comedies? Who knows?

I did like this though, but I don't think it's a full on masterpiece or anything.

Directed by the diverse Howard Hawks, this is a rapid-fire comedy about a feisty newspaper reporter who wants to leave her job to get married. Her boss, and ex-lover however, wants her back, and, to do so, he baits her with a news story she just can't resist.

And plot wise, that's pretty much it. In the original play, the lady was a man, so, by changing the gender, the film adds elements of sexual tension, gender politics, and that kind of subtext, which, yeah, I'll give it a lot of credit for that, especially since this film is 73 years old.

I think that's the key thing here. This was a seminal film, but it's not quite as groundbreaking as it once was. It doesn't have the edge it used to, but I can still admire it for it being so potent at one time.

What really holds up though is the rapid fire dialogue. Now I really know where the Coens got their inspiration for fast talking characters, and where Altman was perhaps inspired in the overlapping dialogue department. And The Social Network. That one had some lightning quick lines, but this one might be the king of all that.

And it is really good writing, too. This is a pretty witty and funny film, but modern audiences unfortunately may not get super into it if they're used to blue humor. It's quite clean here, though there is that undercurrent of sexual tension and subtlety.

The broad basic plot is kinda ho hum (I thought), but still enjoyable, if only for the sharp characters, and the even sharper performances. Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell are great here, and they seem to have a blast going toe to toe with one another.

Besides the snappy dialogue, the film is also known for it's editing, and yeah, it's some pretty snazzy, influential stuff. The film is well shot, and put together in an even better fashion.

So, bottom line: it's a classic, sure, but an overrated one. I dug it, but can say that I would have loved this even more if I was a bigger fan of this kind of thing, and especially had I seen this maybe a few years ago.

Chris Weber

Super Reviewer


Snappy dialogue and a quick-witted script highlight this film from 1940. Based on a play called "The Front Page", director Howard Hawks' "His Girl Friday" takes a comedically serious look at the sleezy world of yellow journalism. Star reporter Hildy (Rosalind Russell) is quitting the newspaper business to go lead a respectable life as the wife of insurance salesman Bruce Baldwin (Ralph Bellamy). However, her former boss (and ex-husband) Walter would rather she forget all this respectability business and come back to work for him (and also marry him again). The story he hopes will bring her back is the execution of cop murderer Earl Williams (John Qualen). Walter is fighting to get a pardon for Williams, who killed a "colored" cop and the mayor is only trying to get him executed because of the election coming up (because the colored vote is very strong in that town). Apparently, Williams was driven "crazy" because of all the hard times poor people must face, and when a gun was placed in his hand, he was compelled to use it. I guess all this is logical by 1930s standards, but many of these plot details had me cringing. There's a strange amoral morality at work with these characters. They do horrible things to innocent people to get what they want, but I suppose since they're the heroes of the film, we're supposed to root for them. The story is good however, I wonder if it might've been a better drama than screwball comedy.

Mr Awesome
Devon Bott

Super Reviewer

His Girl Friday Quotes

– Submitted by Ron G (2 years ago)
– Submitted by Ben O (3 years ago)

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