Inhale Reviews

Top Critic
Joe Neumaier
New York Daily News
November 9, 2010
The film soon traffics in "Babel"-style cultural crises and melodrama. Still, as a tale of parental desperation and the cost of conscience, "Inhale" comes from a thought-provoking place.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Lou Lumenick
New York Post
October 22, 2010
Milks the very real problem of "organ tourism" for all the melodrama and car chases it's worth.
Full Review | Original Score: 1/4
Top Critic
Stephen Holden
New York Times
October 21, 2010
Filmed in a semi-documentary style, it fitfully aspires to moral seriousness.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/5
Top Critic
Joe Morgenstern
Wall Street Journal
October 21, 2010
All of the beatings, betrayals and bitter ironies leave a bad taste in your head.
Top Critic
Gary Goldstein
Los Angeles Times
October 21, 2010
It takes a while to get there, but Inhale eventually emerges as a tense and morally complex thriller with a devastating twist.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Scott Tobias
AV Club
October 21, 2010
It's neither remotely convincing as true-to-life drama or lurid and propulsive enough to work as exploitation. It's just bad.
Full Review | Original Score: D
Top Critic
Eric Hynes
Village Voice
October 21, 2010
Ripped from the headlines and sensationalized for your would-be pleasure, Inhale uses the appalling phenomenon of illegal organ trafficking as the basis for an almost-as-appalling hyperventilated thriller.
Top Critic
Kirk Honeycutt
Hollywood Reporter
October 21, 2010
The final act hits like a gut-punch.
Top Critic
Rex Reed
New York Observer
October 20, 2010
You will go away with your heart full and your eyes wide open.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Nick Schager
Time Out
October 20, 2010
Illegal organ trafficking is undeniably serious; this tawdry message movie about the subject, however, most unequivocally isn't.
Full Review | Original Score: 1/5
Top Critic
Ronnie Scheib
Variety
October 7, 2010
Walter Doty III and John Clafin's hackneyed script depicts Mexico as one vast, interconnected conspiracy engaged in the underground organ trade, whose highest-ranked traffickers are -- gasp! -- Americans.