Total Recall: Don Cheadle's Best Movies

We count down the best-reviewed work of the Iron Man 2 star.

by |

Don Cheadle

Eighteen years ago, Don Cheadle was trading quips with Betty White in the short-lived Golden Girls spinoff The Golden Palace. Today? He's getting ready to step into a high-tech suit of armor and do summer blockbuster battle as James "Rhodey" Rhodes in Iron Man 2. Along the way, Cheadle has filmed a number of critically acclaimed roles, produced successful films, campaigned for human rights, and even co-authored a book, all while moving between comedy, drama, and action. This week, we celebrate all this success by spinning the dials on the Tomatometer and looking back at Don Cheadle's ten best-reviewed films. It's time for Total Recall!


82%
Template Image
Fresh

10. Talk to Me

Though he's often appeared as part of ensemble casts, Cheadle has occasionally had the opportunity to take the spotlight for himself -- as with 2007's Talk to Me, which dramatized the life of radio host and Emmy-winning television personality Petey Greene. Though his fame was mostly restricted to the Washington, D.C. area, Greene was an influential figure for many years, using his gift of gab and inspirational journey from prison to the airwaves as the building blocks for a career that earned him acclaim, a visit to the White House (where he famously joked he stole a spoon), and the admiration of followers such as Howard Stern. It wasn't a huge hit, and members of Greene's family criticized its historical inaccuracies, but as far as most critics were concerned, Talk to Me was well worth watching. As Neil Smith wrote for Total Film, "If the picture doesn't ultimately live up to the raw vitality of Cheadle's performance, it remains an uplifting snapshot that broadcasts its message with zero distortion. Tune in and you won't be turned off."


82%
Template Image
Fresh

9. Ocean's Eleven

Cheadle teamed up with director Steven Soderbergh for the third time with 2001's Ocean's Eleven, a remake of the 1960 Rat Pack heist classic that united some of Hollywood's biggest actors for no purpose greater than the simple thrill of watching impossibly good-looking people steal from other good-looking people in an unbelievably glamorous setting. It sounds shallow, and it is -- but it's also a heck of a lot of fun, as evidenced by the $450 million it grossed amidst generally bemused reviews from critics who couldn't help but appreciate a well-made, tuxedo-clad caper flick. For Eleven -- as well as its two sequels -- the Kansas City-born Cheadle got to strap on a Cockney accent for the role of explosives expert Basher Tarr, a part that made up in funny lines (and earth-shaking stunts) what it lacked in screen time. Summing up its appeal in his review for Bullz-Eye, David Medsker wrote, "We're not talking about reinventing the genre here. This is just a Big Mac and fries of a movie, and those movies, like the food, can hit the spot sometimes, especially when you're hung over."


82%
Template Image
Fresh

8. Colors

It wasn't his first role in a major film, but Cheadle's appearance in 1988's Colors -- as Rocket, the ill-fated Crips leader who crosses paths with LAPD Detectives Bob Hodges (Robert Duvall) and Danny McGavin (Sean Penn) -- was definitely an early breakthrough. (That gig he scored on Richard Grieco's Booker in 1989? Totally wouldn't have gotten it without Colors.) Its tale of warring gangs in 1980s Los Angeles might seem a little tired now, but in its day, this Dennis Hopper-directed drama was actually sort of groundbreaking -- and it boasted a terrific soundtrack, too, including the hit title track, performed by Ice-T. (Yes, kids, before his Law & Order days, he was a rapper.) The film earned widespread praise from critics such as Roger Ebert, who wrote, "Colors is a special movie -- not just a police thriller, but a movie that has researched gangs and given some thought to what it wants to say about them."


85%
Template Image
Fresh

7. Rosewood

Director John Singleton snapped a critical dry spell with 1997's Rosewood, a harrowing dramatization of 1923's shameful Rosewood massacre, during which the residents of a primarily black Florida town were attacked by whites from a neighboring city, setting off days of horrific racial violence that culminated in Rosewood's total abandonment. It's the kind of episode any country would rather forget -- and forget it most Americans did, for decades. Rosewood capped a 15-year period when the tragedy was rediscovered, first by journalists, then finally by the politicians who authorized reparations for its survivors. As Sylvester Carrier, a piano teacher who watches helplessly as the violence engulfs his home, Cheadle brings a nuanced performance full of palpable sorrow and defiance to a film that occasionally strays into -- pardon the phrase -- black and white. Unfortunately, most filmgoers weren't interested in reliving this dark chapter in our history, and Rosewood left theaters a commercial failure -- though not for want of positive reviews from critics like Jose Martinez of Boxoffice Magazine, who wrote, "Comparisons to today's society can't help but be made while watching Rosewood; although moviegoers might wish to leave the theatre thinking we are living in a better time, they might not be able to."


87%
Template Image
Fresh

6. Devil in a Blue Dress

In a career dotted with scene-stealing turns, Cheadle's performance as the violent Mouse Alexander in Devil in a Blue Dress borders on the larcenous -- which is saying quite a bit, given how comfortably the film's star, Denzel Washington, fit into his starring role as detective Easy Rawlins. Matter of fact, director Carl Franklin's adaptation of the Walter Mosley novel was strong all around, as attested by its healthy 90 percent Tomatometer rating; this slice of immaculately fedora-ed neo-noir may not have caught on with filmgoers, but for critics like the Washington Post's Hal Hinson, it was nothing short of "First-rate American pulp -- fast, absorbing and substantive." Amidst all the critical praise for Devil in a Blue Dress, Cheadle earned an impressive number of nods all his own, including Best Supporting Actor awards from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association and the National Society of Film Critics. As Todd McCarthy wrote in his review for Variety, "Entering the main flow of the story relatively late, Don Cheadle steals all his scenes as a live-wire, trigger-happy old buddy of Easy's from Texas."

Comments