L'Argent Reviews

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Christopher Null
Filmcritic.com
June 5, 2005
It's cold and clinical, and more than a little depressing.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Eric Henderson
Slant Magazine
June 12, 2005
It's mind-blowing.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
Leo Goldsmith
Not Coming to a Theater Near You
September 20, 2005
Bresson is not often noted for his engagement with social issues, but in fact his films consistently address the physical and spiritual effects of poverty and crime.
Anton Bitel
Movie Gazette
July 22, 2005
blank in style and bleak in message... Yet like money itself, the value of L'Argent is no more or less than what one is willing to give it.
Jeffrey M. Anderson
Combustible Celluloid
May 30, 2005
As others have pointed out, it does not feel like the work of a man in his 80s.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
Sam Jordison
Film4
May 24, 2003
This unique and meticulous work of art makes a fitting swansong for a cinematic genius.
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat
Spirituality and Practice
August 19, 2004
Based on a novella by Tolstoy, this French film offers an elegant study of money.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Dennis Schwartz
Ozus' World Movie Reviews
May 15, 2005
A powerful and harrowing film that renews one's faith that modern cinema can bring to light what no other medium can do in the same way.
Full Review | Original Score: A+
Jeremy Heilman
MovieMartyr.com
June 12, 2005
The ending, most of all, shows Bresson's ability to find an alternate route to grace, given the circumstances.
Laura Clifford
Reeling Reviews
January 2, 2012
...we can see Bresson's influence on Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski, Yvon's curtly procedural trial and subsequent acts a precursor to "A Short Film About Killing."
Full Review | Original Score: B+
Top Critic
Michael Atkinson
Village Voice
March 5, 2013
A harrowing scour of ideological cinema.
Doug Cummings
Filmjourney
June 11, 2005
L'Argent showcases the filmmaker at the height of his formal ingenuity, particularly his use of narrative ellipses and fragmented space (close-ups of legs, hands, objects).
Michael E. Grost
Classic Film and Television
January 31, 2012
Harrowing crime film about the persecution of a working class man by the rich.
Thomas Delapa
Boulder Weekly
January 3, 2005
| Original Score: 3/5
Gabe Leibowitz
Film and Felt
July 22, 2003
Bresson's obsessive leg and arm shots force us to use our imaginations; there are no eyes to tell us what the characters are feeling.
Full Review | Original Score: 92/100
Top Critic
Anthony Lane
New Yorker
March 5, 2013
Bresson -- who was eighty-two years old when the film came out, and clearly in no mood for mellowing -- frames the acts of wickedness, both great and small, with a terrifying calm.
Adrian Miles
Senses of Cinema
June 6, 2001
Sacred cause and action is outside of reason, this is one of its sacred aspects, and will always remain mysterious. In Bresson's world we are fallen too.
Marjorie Baumgarten
Austin Chronicle
March 10, 2003
Many critics regard it as the very best film of the Eighties.
Top Critic
Vincent Canby
New York Times
May 20, 2003
It's tough but it's also rewarding.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Emanuel Levy
EmanuelLevy.Com
July 30, 2005
| Original Score: 5/5
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