• Unrated, 1 hr. 45 min.
  • Drama, Classics
  • Directed By:
    John Ford
    In Theaters:
    Nov 11, 1940 Wide
    On DVD:
    Jun 6, 2006
  • Criterion Collection

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The Long Voyage Home Reviews

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Conner R

Super Reviewer

June 22, 2010
I really love this movie for being so completely unique and moody. The cinematography is absolutely breathtaking and the way John Ford manipulates the camera is completely revolutionary. This is from what I can tell one of the first anti-war messages for WWII, it's very direct and not overdone or sappy. This has great characters, an ensemble drama that should never be forgotten.
John B

Super Reviewer

December 11, 2013
Dreadfully dull tale featuring a very young John Wayne talking about probably the most boring cross Atlantic trip ever taken. Someone is a German spy on board and the audience doesn't care.
Sean G

Super Reviewer

August 14, 2011
Story of a mixed bunch a merchant sailors. It's funny to hear John Wayne play a Swede. His accent is almost as bad as Jamie Lee Curtis's one in Trading Places, and that was on purpose. Thomas Mitchell is a character as always.
January 23, 2012
Interesting, but not really much of a movie. There's some developments that happen, but they don't really add up to anything in particular. John Wayne played someone way outside of his normal character though.
jam233
April 16, 2010
79/100. John Ford combined four of Eugene O?Neill stories into this film. He does a great job directing and does exceptional developing the characters, as he usually does. The cinematography is stunning, the use of light and shadows is so effective. The score is superb. Good cast, although casting John Wayne is a Swede was a curious choice. Although Wayne doesn?t hurt the overall effect of the film, he doesn?t help it either. Thomas Mitchell, Barry Fitzgerald, Mildred Natwick and John Qualen stand out in the cast. A beautifully done film. The Long Voyage Home was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture.
gwynfallan
April 30, 2008
John Wayne playing a Norwegian straight man in a comedy routine...the acting is kinda bad or maybe the accent just makes it worse, but somehow it manages to work.
cycleman343
January 2, 2008
bad writing made a disappointing story. terrible acting made unconvincing and downright annoying characters (epescially Driscoll and Axel).
Mark  Delledonne
April 25, 2012
This was just a horrible movie, weak, weak, weak. I could not make it the whole way through it!
June 16, 2012
Beautifully directed, well written and well acted, The Long Voyage Home is really quite something. A motley crew of sailors, and the things they get up to, from wild brawls, to anti-war messages, it's a wonderful film.

Not to mention seeing John Wayne play a lumbering, good-natured Swede.
starlett2005
May 17, 2012
The Long Voyage Home is a decent film. It is about the lives of the crew on the Glencairn. John Wayne and Thomas Mitchell give good performances. The screenplay is okay because of several flaws. John Ford did a pretty good job directing this movie. I like this motion picture but not a favorite of Ford's films that I have seen.
gillianren
January 3, 2011
John Wayne Should've Followed His Instincts

I get it. John Ford had himself a group of people he liked to work with, and he stuck with it. I can respect that. Really, it seems true of most of the Great Directors, living and dead. If they had a chance to control their cast and crew, they worked with people they knew they could deal with. Or, in the Kinski/Herzog dynamic, who they knew could give them the work they wanted. Some time ago, I came across a feature on Empire Online discussing forty great director/actor pairings. Oh, I disagreed with a lot of their choices, but not with this one. John Ford and John Wayne made twenty-one movies together. Only two pairings on the list even come close to that, and they're both numbers in their teens. (Bergman/Von Sydow and Kurosawa/Mifune, for the curious.) For both of them, among their greatest and most famous works were with each other.

That doesn't mean the casting works here. You see, John Wayne plays Ole Olsen, a young man who left his farm in Sweden and went to sea. The story here is woven around the tales of a handful of men sailing on the [i]Glencairn[/i] from the West Indies to the UK bringing munitions to the war-torn island. They're a motley bunch. Driscoll (Thomas Mitchell) and Cocky (Barry Fitzgerald) are Irishman, bound together despite their mutual dislike by their love of their homeland. Smitty (Ian Hunter) is brooding and turns out to have abandoned a family, including a wife who refuses to think of him as dead. Axel Swanson (John Qualen), I think, is another Scandinavian, this one with a convincing accent even though the actor was born in Vancouver. The men all seem to know that they will someday die at sea, but since Ole has a home and a family, they are determined that he will not join them in that fate. They will get him on a ship back to Sweden as soon as the ship they're on reaches port.

This is considered John Ford's first World War II movie, and I suppose I can see why. After all, the reason these men are on this particular voyage is that they are shipping TNT to the UK, where it will serve the war interest. The driving force behind one of the film's only dramatic sequences is the idea that a secretive man might be a Nazi spy. The ship is attacked as they sail into the Channel. When they do hit port, the newspaper headlines are all about the German invasion of Norway. And the movie's final moments are made tragic not by ordinary circumstances but by the events of the war. However, for a large amount of the story as a whole, it literally does not matter when the movie was set. The world is the ship. The ship is as isolated in the middle of the sea as the Earth is in the middle of space. They know that the ship they are on could be sunk at any time, but that is not a fate limited to men on ships during time of war.

One of the things I found problematic about this film was that the events after the [i]Glencairn[/i] gets to port take up too much of it. Mind, the final tragedy of the film takes place on shore and must have its setup. I do know this. However, for example, the woman who drinks with Olsen is given more characterization than she needs. It's not that I think she needs to be one-dimensional. It's more that I don't think she needs to be two-dimensional. Ford lingers on her so long that I began to think there would be some reason for all that development. She didn't want to do what she did, but once it's done, she seems to have moved on entirely. She's not important, and the way the film portrays her, we think she's going to be. What she does is important; she is not. Just now, I looked at how long the film was, and the answer is "far shorter than I thought." It isn't necessarily that I wanted the movie to be shorter. It's more that I wanted the length to be spread differently.

And then, yes, there is John Wayne. He doesn't talk much in the movie, or didn't that I noticed, and that was great. Certainly John Wayne did just fine in the portrayal of the Strong Silent Type. But every time he opened his mouth, it killed it. I've heard that his accent was actually considered pretty good by experts; I haven't heard the reaction of actual Swedes. The issue may just have been that I know it was John Wayne. He didn't want to take the role. He thought he would make a terrible Swede. It wasn't that he was that huge of a star; his breakout role was the year before. (Speculation holds that part of the reason he worked so hard to stay out of the war was that he didn't think he was a big enough star to get hired again when he came back.) However, I count seven movies with the word "trail" in the title before then. There are exceptions, but people who know him knew him as a cowboy. It's only worse now. And surely there were [i]actual[/i] Swedes around to take the part!
jazza923
April 16, 2010
79/100. John Ford combined four of Eugene O'Neill stories into this film. He does a great job directing and does exceptional developing the characters, as he usually does. The cinematography is stunning, the use of light and shadows is so effective. The score is superb. Good cast, although casting John Wayne is a Swede was a curious choice. Although Wayne doesn't hurt the overall effect of the film, he doesn't help it either. Thomas Mitchell, Barry Fitzgerald, Mildred Natwick and John Qualen stand out in the cast. A beautifully done film. The Long Voyage Home was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture.
Virus
July 3, 2007
Stunning cinematographry but thats pretty much it. Minor Ford.
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