Mansome Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ April 18, 2015
Although the male grooming topic is potentially intriguing (including mustache obsessions, metrosexuals, and competitive beard growing), there is no real focus through the divergent subtopics. Told with humor and a bit of satirized machismo, the documentary is lighthearted and does not offer any significant insight into deeper issues such as male insecurities with body image or cultural pressures on the modern American man. It's pure fluff: light, pleasant and unmemorable. As a "documentary", it's flimsy and undeserving.
hunterjt13
Super Reviewer
May 14, 2013
Morgan Spurlock, Will Arnett, and Jason Bateman explore men's grooming and its relationship to masculinity.
What Mansome could be is an examination of masculinity in modern day pop culture, post-feminist movement. In fact, it could be the documentary version of all the strengths of Brief Interviews with Hideous Men. But instead its reliance on extreme reactions to male hair and its profile of a modern-day fop do little to deliver any salient cultural criticism. What emerges are the outliers of our society -- a man with a massive beard and a man who spends more time preening than most birds -- and I finished the film learning nothing new about the macrocosm and learning only dismissible factoids about the microcosm.
Overall, Mansome, considering its wealth of talent, doesn't live up to its potential.
Super Reviewer
½ May 15, 2012
One of the newer efforts from semi-sterling documentary director Morgan Spurlock, Mansome is certainly one of his lesser efforts, reflected in its universal panning from critics and nearly invisible release. Though the description of the film is about the view of masculinity and possibly how men are perceived in society, it doesn't delve quite deep enough to do anything new or interesting. It touches upon things that are of interest, but overall it's trite and lazy. Instead of really looking into the Adonis factor or exploring the view men have of their place in the world, the film looks at different facets of the male appearance. Sections break this film up, including parts about beards, mustaches, and grooming, which circle each other, overlapping time and again. Celebrities lend their support with interviews on subjects that mostly cover facial hair. Jason Bateman and Will Arnett executive produced and star in this venture, turning up in bit parts throughout to lend their own opinions on these subjects while getting pampered at a spa. This tidbit of film is inane and makes it even more difficult to take anything Spurlock is pitching us, reliable. Though Spurlock has comically covered topics such as product placement, consumerism, and political hubris with ease, here there is little to find funny. Unless you find men being effeminate or rocking a styling do it's really a desert wasteland. The only section of the film that holds any interest is when they veer away from macho beardsmen and focus on a Sikh metrosexual who gets constant cosmetic touchups and cares quite a bit about his appearance. His backstory and choices, which he explains in depth, are the only part of this film that focuses on other men, or men that aren't happy to chime in with dullard opinions on masculinity. Though it's not a perfect film, I did find aspects of it engrossing, especially when Spurlock focuses on these men as a whole, not just what they can make funny for the film.
Super Reviewer
May 29, 2012
As a devoted fan of Morgan Spurlock, I was genuinely entertained by his comic observation into the world of male grooming, but the moderate insight into the topic brings this down to one of Spurlock's lesser efforts in the documentaries he's made. However, the celebrity interviews certainly shine in several parts, especially Will Arnett and Jason Bateman's trip to a high-class spa. If you're a devoted Spurlock fan like I am, it won't hurt for a viewing.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ March 21, 2014
With little insight into the perplexingly successful Hollywood career of Jason Bateman, "Mansome" is a superficial documentary about how shallow society has become while giving little thought to the cost, except in pricing haircuts. But according to Morgan Spurlock, that's a very good thing, as how else are you supposed to find a mate if you are not looking your very best, according to men's magazines.(Note: I read the New Yorker.) But if all you are going by is looks, then what kind of person will you end up with? Maybe somebody who will shave your back but not somebody who will have it.

This is also in a country where we are constantly informed that we are either too skinny or too fat. That's not to mention its long vicious history of racism that continues to inform all sorts of beauty standards even today. And then the movie celebrates the Sikh subject's turning his back on his tradition without worrying about any kind of downside.
Super Reviewer
½ April 18, 2015
Although the male grooming topic is potentially intriguing (including mustache obsessions, metrosexuals, and competitive beard growing), there is no real focus through the divergent subtopics. Told with humor and a bit of satirized machismo, the documentary is lighthearted and does not offer any significant insight into deeper issues such as male insecurities with body image or cultural pressures on the modern American man. It's pure fluff: light, pleasant and unmemorable. As a "documentary", it's flimsy and undeserving.
November 6, 2014
meh, pretty blasee, not Spurlock's best effort
April 12, 2014
A light-hearted documentary from Morgan Spurlock about the modern (essentially straight) man's grooming habits. It is split up into chapters (moustache, beard, body, head etc) which are punctuated by skits between Jason Bateman and Ben Silverman (also producers of the film).
It kind of skims over the potentially interesting subject of the analysis of metrosexuality. The skits are uber unfunny and only some of the talking heads are interesting.
Don't waste your time.
Harlequin68
Super Reviewer
½ March 21, 2014
With little insight into the perplexingly successful Hollywood career of Jason Bateman, "Mansome" is a superficial documentary about how shallow society has become while giving little thought to the cost, except in pricing haircuts. But according to Morgan Spurlock, that's a very good thing, as how else are you supposed to find a mate if you are not looking your very best, according to men's magazines.(Note: I read the New Yorker.) But if all you are going by is looks, then what kind of person will you end up with? Maybe somebody who will shave your back but not somebody who will have it.

This is also in a country where we are constantly informed that we are either too skinny or too fat. That's not to mention its long vicious history of racism that continues to inform all sorts of beauty standards even today. And then the movie celebrates the Sikh subject's turning his back on his tradition without worrying about any kind of downside.
½ March 8, 2014
it was not about men
February 13, 2014
Never answers any movie's most essential question: Why should we care?
September 25, 2013
Mansome is a strange mix of pointless interviews and a slightly annoying sub dialogue of Jason Bateman and Will Arnett as they get a spa treatment. The three stars are for the section that follows the Beardman and his unique ginger beard in his quest to dominate all beard competitions.
½ July 24, 2013
Although this documentary is not as intriguing as it should be, I still found myself enjoying Mansome. Listening to comedians talk about what defines a man today did leave me laughing, and I was interested during it's run time. If you really want a deep documentary, then maybe is not for you (the title is about as deep as it gets). However for a casual watcher, you'll find yourself entertained.
½ March 4, 2013
why wasn't this better?
February 1, 2013
Little insight for sure, but it was ok for what it was.
January 31, 2013
The scenes between Artnett and Bateman are classic and funny!
January 16, 2013
A documentary about male grooming that could have been interesting, hovers around slightly amusing, but decides to say absolutely nothing in it's runtime.
January 6, 2013
The documentary idea is there but the execution and editing is completely scattered.
November 18, 2012
Spurlock has lost his appeal.
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