The Most Dangerous Game Reviews

Page 2 of 13
September 1, 2014
Pretty cool for 1932. Filmed before Hollywood instituted "standards" for movies relative to sexuality. Therefore, Fay Wray came off a little "hotter" than one might expect. Count Zaroff gave the flick a bit of a creepy feel.
½ April 29, 2014
Of course, "game" has two meanings here and an incredibly young Joel McCrea fits one of them. Based on Richard Connell's well-travelled short story (see, for example, the episode of Gilligan's Island), the plot finds McCrea shipwrecked on a supposedly uninhabited island which turns out to be run by an insane Russian count who uses humans as prey for his big game hunting. The second meaning of game involves the contest to stay alive until the sun rises at 4 AM. Fay Wray, a victim of a previous planned shipwreck (yes, they are planned by the count to secure his prey), is along for the ride as a scream queen. Leslie Banks is wicked and creepy (or wicked creepy) as the count. Very brief at only 63 minutes but full of action and evocative enough - and filmed simultaneously with King Kong on many of the same sets.
½ April 1, 2014
"A HUNTER BECOMES THE HUNTED"

- Long before 'The Hunger Games ' and 'Battle Royale', there was 'The Most Dangerous Game'. This black-and-white 1932 horror adventure, based on the short story by Richard Connell, is about a wealthy man who hunts humans on his private Island. Starring 'King Kong' actors Fay Wray and Robert Armstrong. Funny to know is that a part of 'King Kong's jungle set has been used in this film. I love these stories and must say the film, although dated and with a length of only 62 minutes, is still very good.

Hunter and author Bob Rainsford is travelling with a group of friends aboard a luxurious ship. When the vessel hits a riff, it explodes and sinks. Everyone except Bob dies. He manages to swim to a nearby Island. Going through a jungle he finds a castle. Inside he is welcomed by the owner, Count Zaroff, who tells him that he's not the first person who arrives after a sinking accident. Two of his guests are also survivors of a previous sinking: the beautiful Eve Trowbridge (Wray) and her brother Martin (Amstrong). Zarloff reveals to Bob that he is also a fanatic hunter. He loves to hunt 'the most dangerous game' on his island. Bob thinks the man means tigers, but later learns from Eve that the Count likes to hunt on humans.
March 16, 2014
This 1932 adaptation of the short story doesn't do it justice. A modern day remake would be great to see.
Super Reviewer
January 20, 2014
An impressive classic suspense thriller. The Criterion disc release is a treat.
November 22, 2013
a great old fashioned adventure story. enjoyable movie with good performances. watched it on class.
November 18, 2013
The acting in this movie is overly cheesy and should not score 100 just because its old. I like old movies and I like this one for its sets characters and cheese level, but really 100
½ April 11, 2012
Very solid 1930s horror/thriller effort that will thrill fans of the genre and the 63 min. running time is only an added bonus.
April 21, 2011
Innovative as Island of the Lost Souls was, a film from the same year. The two films ought to be considered companion pieces, early, pre-Code, B-movie flicks with horrifying island antics and haunting performances by the villains. Leslie Banks!
June 7, 2012
An insane hunter arranges for ships to be wrecked so that he can amuse himself by hunting them like animals in his island. What should feel like a thrown together lightweight thriller adventure shot on the jungle sets of King Kong actually feels like a gripping and chilling film full of suspense and exciting action sequences that can boast some admirable photography, particularly in its final chase sequences.
½ April 11, 2013
It has all the qualities that make an old-time thriller as much fun as we like them.
½ February 6, 2013
A short thriller from the 30's that understands its limitations but tries to overcome them. It is the first adaptation from Richard Connell's short story where man becomes the prey. The buoys near an island have been readjusted to lead boats near coral reefs where they sink. Any survivors will make it to a small island where they will encounter the Russian Count Zaroff. When McCrea's character arrives at the lonely mansion-fortress, he is introduced to two other survivors from a previous ship wreck. McCrea meets the character of Wray who is suspicious of the count when two previous shipmates never return to the castle. Quite a bit of the acting is flawed and superficial, but this was one of the earliest action films with special effects. They are still beginning to explore how the film and sound mediums can be employed to their advantage. A fast paced piece that builds suspense within its narrative. While its superficiality and lack of expertise hold it back, it is groundbreaking in entering the uncharted waters of action and the philosophical question of what it would be like to be the hunted rather than the hunter; humans hunting each other. David O. Selznick produced this film for Radio Pictures.
½ December 27, 2012
Pretty good, though the lack of subtitles on Hulu meant I missed a lot of the dialogue, so I'll need to see this again sometime to really be able to nail down an opinion.
August 8, 2010
There's some surprisingly gruesome stuff in this pre production code 30s film. Shot on the same sets as King Kong.
November 13, 2012
Count Zaroff means for his hunting to act upon the most extreme limits of possibility. Human possibility. Sadistic and motivated, Zaroff keeps a trophy room of his kills... human heads among other things, at the expense of the innocent shipwreck survivors. A mere classic in a misunderstood genre of filmmaking. One does not need only monsters and gore to create horror, rather, the most simple sadistic aspects of the human mind proves to be the most terrifying reality of all.
November 1, 2012
What a delicious slice of a 1930's campy, action/adventure movie. The Most Dangerous Game is not overly original in its storytelling, but it is ahead of the curve when it comes to content.

An American hunter named Bob Rainsford is shipwrecked on a deserted island. Or at least he thinks it's deserted. He happens upon a Russian mansion owned by the eerie Count Zaroff. There are two other shipwreck survivors already living with the Count. Rainsford is just happy to be alive, until he finds out the secret of Count Zaroff. The Count is a hunter as well. After years of hunting, the unthinkable happend, he started to get bored with hunting. He had hunted some of the most terrifying game, like leopards and tigers. But now he hunts the most dangerous game...people. He lures people to his island and plays the most dangerous game. They have to survive a day on his island, without him killing them. If they do, they are freed. No one had ever survived the Count. Rainsford and fellow captive, Eve Trowbridge, are sent out into the island. He must use his skill as a hunter to elude Count Zaroff.

There are many pluses to this movie, but the acting isn't one of them. I never liked Joel McCrea, and he isn't very good in this. It is a functional performance, but kind of stiff. The Queen of Scream, Fay Wray, plays Eve. Most well known for her role in King Kong, Wray gives a similar performance to McCrea. Usable, but stiff. The one shining actor is Leslie Banks as Count Zaroff. He is appropriately over-the-top, but it is definitely the best performance of the movie.

This is the most violent classic movie that I've seen. By today's standards, this is pretty tame, but for back then...There are severed heads, and characters getting impaled by bamboo sticks, and our hero snapping a bad guys back. Of course it's made in the 30's, so it isn't gory, but still, you don't see stuff like this from back then.

It has a few faults, but The Most Dangerous Game is still highly entertaining. At only 63 minutes, it never drags or overstays its welcome. For classic movie fans, this is easily worth a watch.

"This world's divided into two kinds of people: the hunter and the hunted. Luckily I'm the hunter. Nothing can change that." 8.5/10
October 26, 2012
Great little 1930s suspense/horror movie, but yet again horrendously overrated by RT! A strong cast deal with a relatively straightforward plot, but the pace and atmosphere save the day. A unique little story and another in the great run of 1930s shockers.
½ January 26, 2011
willis o'brien and fay wray, ring a bell.
½ August 23, 2012
I don't know why I didn't like this that much, aside from the several ways it's different from its source.

PLOT:After getting in a shipwreck off a boat headed to a hunt, world-renowned hunter, Bob Rainsford (Joel McCrea) swims to a mysterious island where he finds a castle lead by a Count Zaroff (Leslie Banks), a Russian Cossack that has also has a passion for the hunt. While there, Rainsford also discovers two more shipwreck survivors, heavy-drinking Martin Trowbridge (Robert Armstrong) and his beautiful sister, Eve Trowbridge (Fay Wray). They chat for a while, and Rainsford finds out by Zaroff that, on this certain island, Zaroff hunts the most dangerous game. Zaroff tells about how he got bored hunting some usually dangerous animals (such as tigers), and how he wanted a prey that can use reason. Through this we find out the most dangerous game is humans. After a suspenseful turn of events, Rainsford and Eve must play the role of the hunted and win against him within a day. It's a great plot executed decently.

ACTING:The acting in here is not so great. You can tell by far that it's dated. McCrea plays a decent part of Rainsford, but the screenplay does him almost no justice. Wray did a pretty great job of playing her usual damsel-in-distress character. She was a little over-dramatic, but overall she did great, as did Banks as Zaroff. Banks did a pretty great job as Zaroff as well, but he sounded angry almost all the time, as opposed to his role in the story of being smooth and calm. I think Zaroff's character would've much better been played by the likes of Bela Lugosi. It has the dramatic death scene and everything! The minor performances overall didn't really matter as well.

SCORE:The score was pretty cheesy, but for its time, it was pretty top notch, so I'll give it credit for that much.

CAMERAWORK:I noticed in here a pretty good use of the camera to capture the emotions of the actors, as used in old horror films. The director actually hit spot on with trying to capture the emotions with the camera.

OTHER CONTENT:I really don't know why I didn't like this film as much as I wanted to. I read the story before I watched it, and as early as the start of the film, I spotted about a thousand differences from the story that make the film lose some of its wit. That kind of ticked me off. If a film strays too far from its source material, I tend to get frustrated. The film also seemed to lag a bit in the middle and lose the suspense it did acheive. The film did have a good bit of suspenseful scenes, and it even used a handful of horror tactics to make things better. However, it altogether ended up pretty dated and mediocre.

OVERALL,an ok film with a decently-executed plot, dated acting, top notch score for the time being, pretty good use of the camera, some great suspense, and even some horror techniques, but the screenplay did the actors hardly any justice, the film falls from its source material greatly, and it lagged a good bit in the middle.
August 23, 2012
I don't know why I didn't like this that much, aside from the several ways it's different from its source.

PLOT:After getting in a shipwreck off a boat headed to a hunt, world-renowned hunter, Bob Rainsford (Joel McCrea) swims to a mysterious island where he finds a castle lead by a Count Zaroff (Leslie Banks), a Russian Cossack that has also has a passion for the hunt. While there, Rainsford also discovers two more shipwreck survivors, heavy-drinking Martin Trowbridge (Robert Armstrong) and his beautiful sister, Eve Trowbridge (Fay Wray). They chat for a while, and Rainsford finds out by Zaroff that, on this certain island, Zaroff hunts the most dangerous game. Zaroff tells about how he got bored hunting some usually dangerous animals (such as tigers), and how he wanted a prey that can use reason. Through this we find out the most dangerous game is humans. After a suspenseful turn of events, Rainsford and Eve must play the role of the hunted and win against him within a day. It's a great plot executed decently.

ACTING:The acting in here is not so great. You can tell by far that it's dated. McCrea plays a decent part of Rainsford, but the screenplay does him almost no justice. Wray did a pretty great job of playing her usual damsel-in-distress character. She was a little over-dramatic, but overall she did great, as did Banks as Zaroff. Banks did a pretty great job as Zaroff as well, but he sounded angry almost all the time, as opposed to his role in the story of being smooth and calm. I think Zaroff's character would've much better been played by the likes of Bela Lugosi. It has the dramatic death scene and everything! The minor performances overall didn't really matter as well.

SCORE:The score was pretty cheesy, but for its time, it was pretty top notch, so I'll give it credit for that much.

CAMERAWORK:I noticed in here a pretty good use of the camera to capture the emotions of the actors, as used in old horror films. The director actually hit spot on with trying to capture the emotions with the camera.

OTHER CONTENT:I really don't know why I didn't like this film as much as I wanted to. I read the story before I watched it, and as early as the start of the film, I spotted about a thousand differences from the story that make the film lose some of its wit. That kind of ticked me off. If a film strays too far from its source material, I tend to get frustrated. The film also seemed to lag a bit in the middle and lose the suspense it did acheive. The film did have a good bit of suspenseful scenes, and it even used a handful of horror tactics to make things better. However, it altogether ended up pretty dated and mediocre.

OVERALL,an ok film with a decently-executed plot, dated acting, top notch score for the time being, pretty good use of the camera, some great suspense, and even some horror techniques, but the screenplay did the actors hardly any justice, the film falls from its source material greatly, and it lagged a good bit in the middle.
Page 2 of 13