• Unrated, 1 hr. 26 min.
  • Comedy
  • Directed By:    Jacques Tati
  • In Theaters:    Feb 25, 1953 Wide
  • On DVD:    Jan 6, 2004
  • Janus Films

Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot (Mr. Hulot's Holiday) Reviews

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Graham J
Super Reviewer
January 23, 2013
Slapstick at it's finest. Never has comedy looked more beautiful than in the hands of the great Jaques Tati.
Mr Awesome Mr Awesome
Super Reviewer
May 16, 2012
Writer, director and actor Jacques Tati invites us to glimpse into his strange little world in "Mr. Hulot's Holiday", a film that paved the way for comedians like Mr. Bean's Rowan Atkinson. Mr. Hulot's Holiday is slightly less absurdist than later Tati fare like "Mon Oncle", but there are times when the film teeters just on the brink of the unreal, and could pass for some sort of fever dream. The plot, if it exists at all, is quite simple: Mr. Hulot goes to a summer beach resort and mingles with the other tourists. Naturally, the film winds up being a series of vignettes sharing only the beach resort and Tati himself as the common denominators. Mr. Hulot could be described as "blissfully unaware" by his friends and admirers (which includes the young blonde woman Martine, who's completely bored by the intellectuals following her around and utterly charmed by Hulot's bizarre antics) and a "menace to society" by those he annoys (and there are plenty of those running around the resort as well). Tati gets the little things right, he shows an eye for details we all know subconsciously but rarely acknowledge in our day to day lives. It's in the way Tati is able to capture the distant memories of some collective past. Hulot's holiday is over all too quickly.
Apeneck F
Super Reviewer
May 14, 2011
a trip seaside's just the ticket, and this'll call for attention to detail on your part, you'll have to actually watch it (just like they did in the old days!), cause there's nearly no dialogue to spell out for you what's happening. And what is happening? nothing. just a trip seaside. it's just the ticket!
rubystevens rubystevens
Super Reviewer
½ October 9, 2008
a charming series of sight gags and sound effects with no real plot
Tim S
Super Reviewer
August 9, 2008
Listen, there are certain things in comedy I just don't get. Monty Python, Mimes, Roberto Begnini, and Meet the Spartans. This is another. I should have known better than to trust anything that the French consider a comedy classic. Janus could have done better in putting a comedy in the collection. (Have none of these assholes heard of Zoolander?) This is one of the few films I turned off in the middle and have had no regrets about not staying until the end.
Ken S
Super Reviewer
May 7, 2007
France's funny and delightful answer to Charlie Chaplin.
Ryan M Ryan M
Super Reviewer
½ July 31, 2011
9.4/10

In a world where most comedies are loud, reckless (even admirably so), and connected with at least one crude joke regarding male genitalia, I wonder if anyone can truly appreciate a film as innocent, charming, and truly funny as "Mr. Hulot's Holiday". The film is an ambitious human satire as much as it is a quiet, but very comedic meditation on the nature of humanity. I appreciated it as much as I enjoyed it; and as you can see, I did both in equal, large measures.

But how could I not like a film as satisfying as this? "Mr. Hulot's Holiday" allows us to peacefully drown in its depths; something that most of us will find very fun and very rewarding. Something tells me that those who are madly in love with today's line of mediocre comedy will not admire the film at all, and maybe I'm right. Every era has its good comedy; and so does every country. England had the great Charlie Chaplin, and the French had Mr. Hulot.

It's a strange thing whenever I watch a film in French, made by the French, or taking place somewhere in France. I'm always hooked; I'm always there staring at the screen in fascination. I admire the language, the culture of the country, and whatever-else I can possibly just "do". I don't suppose that this film does anything to truly give me more insight; but it does do what it does very, very well, and that is why it is a great movie.

So the film involves its titular character, Monsieur "Mr." Hulot, as he treats himself to a beach vacation. He stays at a beautiful resort and yes, he does indeed enjoy his stay.

However, this isn't even the core of the film. The story is basically Mr. Hulot and his adventures; and that's about it. But his adventures are more like disasters, as Hulot himself can be described as a "human tornado". I'm not sure you've heard of the term, but I have, and it definitely applies to the character.

So I suppose that, instead of a plot synopsis, I must provide a good substitute; and I shall. Maybe you would like to know some of the film's "jokes", if one could call them such a thing. But what is a joke? Do we laugh at every "joke"? I don't suppose that the film wants us to be laughing WITH it half of the time. Maybe it sees laughter as a more silent thing that we should all cherish. I agree with the film, if this is the case, and if this is its philosophy.

There's a wonderful scene where Hulot's boat collapses, not too far out from the beach, and it looks like a shark's mouth opening and closing. The people, on the beach, see this and flee with their children; leaving everything else behind. This is funny because it presents simple, but comedic paranoia.

There is a recurring joke in the film. It is the satire of politics and culture; of France, I would say. Staying at the same resort as Hulot are some particularly snobbish people. They are the upper class residents of the country; rude, unaccepting, and annoyed when Hulot unknowingly leaves open the door and lets loose the ever-so-unknown substance known as air into the room.

The film was directed and co-written by Jacques Tati. He also stars as Hulot; his leading character. In appearance, Mr. Hulot dons a trench coat, walks with a lurch, and is forever-smoking a pipe. Hulot is a bumbling idiot; and I suppose this is funny mainly because he isn't particularly "in" on the joke. I'll try to keep myself from spoiling any more of his misadventures in beach-wonderland; as I've already described a few, and they are indeed good misadventures. I guess you'll just have to see the movie for yourself.

Lastly, I immensely enjoyed Tati's shots highlighting the resort, as well as his choice in music. The combination of the two eventually adds up to a relaxing, calm feel. The film is, as I mentioned earlier, innocent; and I liked that. This is real comedy, physical comedy, which might require some real insight on the satire to understand. I would gladly watch "Mr. Hulot's Holiday" again. I would like to revisit the resort and get to know the people who reside there yet again. Not that they matter. Not that they are relevant. But then again, there's enough relevance for one movie contained here, and it definitely creates a great film out of Hulot's first adventure. This is one of the best comedies ever made.
hawkledge hawkledge
Super Reviewer
November 14, 2010
Gentle observation or biting satire, Jacques Tati's Hulot unwittingly disturbing the peace and quiet without fail. Classic dialogue-free humor driven by standout episodes and set pieces. A gem.
shannylee38 shannylee38
Super Reviewer
½ January 21, 2007
Ridiculously funny!
Devon B May 16, 2012
Writer, director and actor Jacques Tati invites us to glimpse into his strange little world in "Mr. Hulot's Holiday", a film that paved the way for comedians like Mr. Bean's Rowan Atkinson. Mr. Hulot's Holiday is slightly less absurdist than later Tati fare like "Mon Oncle", but there are times when the film teeters just on the brink of the unreal, and could pass for some sort of fever dream. The plot, if it exists at all, is quite simple: Mr. Hulot goes to a summer beach resort and mingles with the other tourists. Naturally, the film winds up being a series of vignettes sharing only the beach resort and Tati himself as the common denominators. Mr. Hulot could be described as "blissfully unaware" by his friends and admirers (which includes the young blonde woman Martine, who's completely bored by the intellectuals following her around and utterly charmed by Hulot's bizarre antics) and a "menace to society" by those he annoys (and there are plenty of those running around the resort as well). Tati gets the little things right, he shows an eye for details we all know subconsciously but rarely acknowledge in our day to day lives. It's in the way Tati is able to capture the distant memories of some collective past. Hulot's holiday is over all too quickly.
Bill B ½ November 14, 2010
Another amazing near-silent comedy that is filled with more sight gags than one can keep track of in a single watch. It certainly holds up to repeated viewings, that's for sure.

Tati's Hulot causes casual chaos to those around him as he haphazardly tries to go about his vacation, it's so much fun, I can't say enough good things about these films.

Highly recommended
sherridmontle sherridmontle November 17, 2011
Anyone who says the French have no sense of humor has obviously never seen a Jacques Tati picture. For some reason this is the most special of his movies for me.
Norzeleak Norzeleak May 26, 2010
As amusing as a movie as this is, I didn't genuinely laugh one time throughout the whole film. Whether something was lacking or it was my mostly uninterested view of the slap-stick comedy style, I can only say it's well done but didn't work out in what it actually intended to do, at least for me.
Tim H ½ August 10, 2008
I feel dirty saying "my first Tati."

I wish I had called this one before Flixster did. There would be no Mr. Bean if it wasn't for M. Hulot's Holiday. Now, lots of people have played the slapstick game. Honestly, a lot of people have played the slapstick game better than this movie did. But there is one thing that this movie really shares with Mr. Bean and that is the use of sound. Sure, we can look at Groucho Marx and Harold Lloyd and the forefathers of the entire slapstick silent genre. But these are movies that use silence as a very clear and obvious choice. Sound is important in these movies. The funny thing is that Harold Lloyd uses sound as importance, but he came from a silent era.

My buddy Jeff doesn't really care for Tati. I don't think I have an opinion yet. Personally, I enjoyed this movie. I rarely got any belly laughs. In fact, I found myself being over generous with my laughter, despite being alone in a room. The movie is more about charm than it is about out-and-out laughs. This is a darnright charming movie. Sure, M. Hulot makes some mistakes. BUt he is apparently a great guy who just wants to have a fun time among a bunch of stuff shirts. I think we may have all been there before. Sure, I don't kick people in the butt when they look like they're spying on pretty girls. But there are seemingly genuine moments in this goofy slapsticky comedy. I have to point out where this movie really brings out its chips are in the relationships that Hulot creates. Bean always gets the girl and a kid. Those are the easy ones. But Hulot, by his general nature and overpoliteness, wins over people who are normally silent about their interactions with others opening up and coming alive. The obvious character in this part of the story is obviously the older British lady, who is quite open for most of the movie regarding her feelings about Hulot. But there's one moment where the husband who is dragged around for the entire movie shaking hands with the saddened Hulot. There's this moment of sadness in the movie when you think that the guests all hate him and that moment is redeemed with that handshake. It is fantastic.

There's one great joke that really makes this movie pretty darned good for me. There is this running gag about the car not working. That joke I could take or leave. But the really funny joke comes from the changing of the spare tire in the cemetary. That sequence really steals the entire movie. That's not the only funny joke in the movie, but I do have to stress that the jokes in the movie are much more miss than hit. Really, you are watching this movie for the look and sound of the film. There is a repetetive score throughout the story. Usually, the score artfully follows the appearance of a gorgeous girl. There is no final, unrealistic relationship at the end of the film between Hulot and the girl. Really, it's a lot better of a relationship than the payoff kiss at the end. The kiss has become the old standard. It has lost its power. While I can't say that this is one of cinema's great romances, it does give a little respect to the closing kiss by actually avoiding it. It hink that's pretty darned impressive.

The movie isn't that funny and there isn't a plot to speak of. Really, this is kind of an extremely well made movie that has a lot of heart. It could be mistaken for a Hallmark movie, but I think it is far more than that.
WrellikW WrellikW June 24, 2008
Forgein, French. A B/W classic. A hilarious and stupid comedy about a man on holiday; you'll love it. I highly recommend it.
Harry E June 24, 2007
Tati sets up this whole film as a canvas for his unique style of physical comedy. He's completely free of the constraints of traditional plot structure, which might annoy some viewers. It's a string of vignettes with lovely sight gags superbly staged and executed with wonderful subtlety. He meanders fluidly from setup to setup, and the result is calm and pleasant and hilarious and beautiful.
Dean S September 15, 2007
You could argue that the French have their collective tête up their collective derrière where Jerry Lewis is concerned (I wouldn't, but you could). There is, however, no question they were right about the genius of Jacques Tati -- who, in a perfect world, would have a place in the comedic pantheon seated between Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. Yes, this is a 54-year old black and white French comedy with no dialogue to speak of. And I defy you to sit through it with a straight face.
X. T February 12, 2007
Too charming for words, then again, who needs words when you have M. Hulot, the clumsy silent clown? There is almost no plot and dialogue, just a series of events at the seaside resort in Normandy. Tati's humor is very restrained as this film didn't make me laugh uproarously but merely chuckle and smile. He doesn't rely on violence for his slapstick humor neither. The film is fairly slow paced to give enough time for the spirit of the holidays to sink in. Notice that there isn't a single closeup shot in the film. I think this film would have been more enjoyable if it was in color.
Landen C July 6, 2007
Pays homage to it's predecessors like Chaplin and Keaton, but also sets the stage and a precursor to Mr. Bean and Zucker Brothers. I laughed out loud quite a bit.
shawncorps1 shawncorps1 March 25, 2007
This film is almost as good as Mon Oncle, but is a bit more frivolous and isn't making as much social commentary. They are both witty, observant, and funny in ways that don't necessarily make you laugh, but more often smile, often knowingly.
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