Münchhausen (The Adventures of Baron Munchausen) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Münchhausen (The Adventures of Baron Munchausen) Reviews

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July 31, 2006
Terribles Monty Pythons, toujours aussi terribles...
July 3, 2011
A daring and crazy adventure long before its time.
½ November 14, 2010
Surprisingly good for something commissioned by Nazi Goebbels in his envy over Allied film fantasy spectacles like The Wizard of Oz (and maybe THief of Bagdad 1941 also), but still not quite up to the same level. At least the propaganda here isn't as obnoxiously omnipresent as in their rather laughable & deranged Brit-bashing Titanic movie.
½ October 24, 2010
Not a kids film; sumptuous production values; a fine example of fantasy film making.
½ September 29, 2010
This pleasant fantasy is most notable for being a product of WWII Germany. It might be considered propaganda in the sense that it portrays the Baron as handsome and resourceful, but it feels nothing like a pro-war film. It was ordered to be made by Joseph Goebbels, but a blacklisted writer, Erich Kastner, wrote it with an air of melancholy and even a hint of pacifism. (The Barom shows open disinterest in conquest.) It's very well produced with a pastel-like colors. A must for any fan of Terry Gilliam's later film.
½ September 6, 2010
Joseph Goebbels wanted to make a film that could compete with the likes of "The Wizard of OZ" and this was the end result. The Nazi propaganda is not as overt in this film compared to many others of the era, but it is clearly present. If you can remove the film from it's horrible context, it's actually a pretty entertaining fantasy film.
April 2, 2009
In its moments of dazzlement, whimsy, and humor "Munchausen" (1943) soars, but for my money not nearly as high as the zany 1961 Karel Zeman version or the explosive 1988 Terry Gilliam reimagining.
½ May 8, 2010
I totally understand why Terry Gilliam saw this movie and said, I totally have to remake this in English!!!!
May 8, 2010
Commissioned in 1942 by Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels and with a script written by banned author Erich Kastner, the last thing you'd expect from Munchhausen is a charming little escapist fantasy, and yet that's exactly what you get. Baron Hieronymus Von Munchhausen flits across Europe, seducing Catherine the Great and engaging in duels with irate noblemen before a magician gives him a ring which will turn him invisible for one hour, and also grants him one wish. Munchhausen wishes to remain the "age I am now, for as long as I wish to be", and thus is granted immortality. His companions also have extraordinary powers: one has built a musket which can hit a target one hundred miles away, while the other can run hundreds of miles in an hour, without even getting winded. Munchhausen is captured by the Ottomans when the cannonball he's riding crashes into the palace. They escape by hot air balloon and travel to the moon, where they meet a race of humans who can detach their heads from their bodies. Somehow Munchhausen makes Terry Gilliam's re-make, "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" seem sensible. It's an absurdist fantasy that's almost like an acid trip without the acid. Technically, the sets, the costumes, even the color technique used (agfacolor) are some of the best of any time period, and there is an interesting combination of mischief and poetry to the Baron's character, thanks to a great scrip. Surprisingly, there's quite a bit of nudity in this film (at least it seems like alot for 1943), and the Baron isn't shy in his seductions of the ladies. Munchhausen is quite an interesting piece of history, from many angles, and something I'd recommend to any fans of Gilliam's film.
May 8, 2010
Commissioned in 1942 by Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels and with a script written by banned author Erich Kastner, the last thing you'd expect from Munchhausen is a charming little escapist fantasy, and yet that's exactly what you get. Baron Hieronymus Von Munchhausen flits across Europe, seducing Catherine the Great and engaging in duels with irate noblemen before a magician gives him a ring which will turn him invisible for one hour, and also grants him one wish. Munchhausen wishes to remain the "age I am now, for as long as I wish to be", and thus is granted immortality. His companions also have extraordinary powers: one has built a musket which can hit a target one hundred miles away, while the other can run hundreds of miles in an hour, without even getting winded. Munchhausen is captured by the Ottomans when the cannonball he's riding crashes into the palace. They escape by hot air balloon and travel to the moon, where they meet a race of humans who can detach their heads from their bodies. Somehow Munchhausen makes Terry Gilliam's re-make, "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" seem sensible. It's an absurdist fantasy that's almost like an acid trip without the acid. Technically, the sets, the costumes, even the color technique used (agfacolor) are some of the best of any time period, and there is an interesting combination of mischief and poetry to the Baron's character, thanks to a great scrip. Surprisingly, there's quite a bit of nudity in this film (at least it seems like alot for 1943), and the Baron isn't shy in his seductions of the ladies. Munchhausen is quite an interesting piece of history, from many angles, and something I'd recommend to any fans of Gilliam's film.
May 8, 2010
Fun fun fun, especially if you've read the stories. Pretty darn crazy German 40s comedy, bright sparkling agfa-color, life on the moon, nudity and exotic locations. The perfect escape from life in Germany in '43 which we all know probably wasn't all that grand.
November 11, 2007
Munchausen sheds an eye on what the Nazi government thought was uplifting for the people... myth as propaganda, mostly. (You might see a few Disney movies differently under its contrasty spell.) It's peculiar to witness 1943 German actors insulated from bullets and concentration camps in the midst of a fable vaunting the European upper class. Almost trivially but worth an aside, La Grande Illusion, a French movie about the disintegration of the class system, was about this time declared "Cinematic Public Enemy Number One" in Germany. While I'm a sucker, not being very visual myself, for intensely visual movies, Munchausen didn't feel half as whimsical as The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, directed by Terry Gilliam, or The Wizard of Oz, which directly inspired this 1943 mass hallucination.
November 2, 2009
The Third Reich's failed attempt at blockbuster filmmaking. A gigantic boondoggle compared in scale to Griffith's "Intolerance"; millions of Reichsmarks were wasted on opulent sets, special effects and costumes. Gilliam must've drawn some inspiration from this.
October 27, 2008
"Looks hilarious and divers"I saw the more recent version (certainly not B/W!) Indeed, what a classic special movie, loved it!!sum weird things happen according to a magical story told by Munchhausen himself, sum weird time questions 2. Great!
June 12, 2009
Good, but not overly great telling of the Munchausen story here. Hans A|lber takes the role, and he's pretty good as the adventurer. The special effects are fun and the color cinematography is outstanding. Unfortunately, it's way way too talky, and therefore gets boring in a lot of spots, so feel free to have your fast forward button ready, because it may be wise.
½ April 24, 2009
A wartime spectacular commissioned by Goebbels to celebrate UFa's anniversary and accrue cultural capital against big-budget Western films, this seems like an elaborate futility, following in the wake of Stalingrad. The story is adapted by the banned Erich Kästner under a pseudonym, and celebrates militarism and xenophobia. There is much stagey costume drama and fun effects sequences, centering around the elements of scoped riflery, high-speed running, cannonball riding, a topless Turkish harem, and the dirigible flight to the moon.

However, this is far less innocuous than Gilliam's more recent adaptation. Rather than celebrating the power of story-telling, this casts the Baron as a Campbellian hero who in the closing monolgue boasts of fighting alongside famous aristocrats and monarchists throughout time, including Count Josef Radetzky von Radetz and Emperor Maximilian in Mexico. An immortal fascist counter-revolutionary? Sounds like a Guillermo Del Toro villain, not a monomythical hero. I'd recommend fans of this seek out Karel Zeman's wonderful Baron Prásil (1961) and Méliès version instead.
½ April 20, 2009
The original and much more subtle verson of this story. Well worth seeing. Thou Hitlers fav film produced by his right hand man Gerbels there is little to do with the Natzi party. It was made to compete with the fantasy films being made in the US like wizard of OZ. In many ways its better since it apeals to the more adult crowd and still has magic and comedy for the child or the child like.
½ April 20, 2009
commissioned by Goebbels, but written by a guy whose books were burned by the Nazis in the 30s. no nazi propaganda, as far as i could tell. this is such a weird story. it goes from outlandish goofiness to a very german seriousness in seconds. the costume design, especially of the Sultan and his court, was extremely lavish in a silly kind of way. i didn't not like this movie, but i prefer the 1981 version. it's less wizard-of-Oz-y. Dies ist nicht unsere guten Stern.
April 13, 2009
best bangy film ever saw it with choy
September 11, 2007
How come a film about this my-own-boss, ladies man, and adventurer have been comissioned by Goebbels?? The film is wonderful.... and remarkably un-nazi. Recommended.
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