Five Favorite Films and an Interview with Harvey Weinstein

Summary

Whichever way you look at it, Harvey Weinstein is a legendary figure in the movie world. His original production and distribution company, Miramax, was instrumental in reshaping the landscape of American independent film in the late 1980s and into the '90s, ushering in such landmark movies as Steven Soderbergh's sex, lies, and videotape and Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction. A passionate film lover and formidable Oscar season presence, Weinstein has been involved in all kinds of award-winning films, from Shakespeare In Love to The Lord of the Rings trilogy to last year's Academy champ, The King's Speech. This week, Weinstein serves as a producer and distributor on two critically-lauded films: My Week with Marilyn, starring Michelle Williams as the iconic Miss Monroe, and The Artist, Jean Dujardin's silent movie smash that's now wooing American audiences. The super-producer called in this week for an entertaining chat about his involvement in the projects, what drives him to make films, and how he sees this year's Oscar derby. Read on for the full interview, but first -- we asked him to pick his five favorite films. Back to Article

Comments

Jeff11386

Jeff Brummett

Those are not from the same era as His Girl Friday. We are talking about a 22 year difference and not just that..Think about how much had changed from 1940 to 1962 in film making, humor, politics, society, etc. I think people tend to group all black and white movies together even though they were spread out over half a century..I think HGF and both Kubrick films are wonderful though. HGF is what you would call a perfect example of screwball comedy, which was very popular in the late 30s and 40s. It is completely different from todays popular humor so I can see why you might not find it that funny. I dont find them to be laugh out loud funny per say..But I still really enjoy how clever and well made they were..Also how talented the actors were to spit out those lines like a machine gun while still conveying humor and emotion.

Nov 27 - 06:41 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

I prefer Preston Sturges and Marx Brothers, especially "Duck Soup". Maybe that style has not aged as well, but who are we to judge as we veg out to crap like "2 1/2 Men" and Kevin James? I'll gladly take Groucho, folks. But the later 50-60s comedies are good too. The Kubrick's that were mentioned, but Peter Sellers' tour de force was "A Shot in the Dark". And the great Jack Lemmon comedies, most by Billy Wilder, like "Some Like it Hot" and "The Apartment" and his Walter Matthau team-ups like "Fortune Cookie" and "Odd Couple". That is a lot of ground to cover.

Nov 27 - 07:13 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Did I forget Carole Lombard? The sexiest comedienne, her intellegence puts the dumb blondes to shame. Everyone from Lucille Ball to Goldie Hawn to Drew Barrymore have been imitating her ever since. "Mr and Mrs Smith", "To Be or Not to Be", and "My Man Godfrey" are great examples.

Nov 28 - 02:59 AM

Jeff11386

Jeff Brummett

Those are not from the same era as His Girl Friday. We are talking about a 22 year difference and not just that..Think about how much had changed from 1940 to 1962 in film making, humor, politics, society, etc. I think people tend to group all black and white movies together even though they were spread out over half a century..I think HGF and both Kubrick films are wonderful though. HGF is what you would call a perfect example of screwball comedy, which was very popular in the late 30s and 40s. It is completely different from todays popular humor so I can see why you might not find it that funny. I dont find them to be laugh out loud funny per say..But I still really enjoy how clever and well made they were..Also how talented the actors were to spit out those lines like a machine gun while still conveying humor and emotion.

Nov 27 - 06:46 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

I prefer Preston Sturges and Marx Brothers, especially "Duck Soup". Maybe that style has not aged as well, but who are we to judge as we veg out to crap like "2 1/2 Men" and Kevin James? I'll gladly take Groucho, folks. But the later 50-60s comedies are good too. The Kubrick's that were mentioned, but Peter Sellers' tour de force was "A Shot in the Dark". And the great Jack Lemmon comedies, most by Billy Wilder, like "Some Like it Hot" and "The Apartment" and his Walter Matthau team-ups like "Fortune Cookie" and "Odd Couple". That is a lot of ground to cover.

Nov 27 - 07:13 PM

Christopher256G

Christopher Greffin

I don't think They Were Expendable has aged very well, as a number of war films from that era don't. They look silly next to films like Platoon, Saving Private Ryan, and Downfall (just saw it for the first time on Netflix a few weeks ago) which give an impression about what war is really like. I love John Wayne actually, but I much prefer his better western films over the war films he has done.

Nov 27 - 09:13 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Did I forget Carole Lombard? The sexiest comedienne, her intellegence puts the dumb blondes to shame. Everyone from Lucille Ball to Goldie Hawn to Drew Barrymore have been imitating her ever since. "Mr and Mrs Smith", "To Be or Not to Be", and "My Man Godfrey" are great examples.

Nov 28 - 02:59 AM

Dave J

Dave J

Appreciate for the correction for I've been known to mispell other peoples names before especially the users and it's certainly not going to be the last!

Nov 28 - 02:23 PM

Scott Love

Luke Simpson

Old movies!!!

Nov 28 - 03:58 PM

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