Objectified (2009)



Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Movie Info

A documentary that examines the complex relationship people have with manufactured objects and, by extension, the people who design them. It's a look at the creativity at work behind everything from toothbrushes to tech gadgets. It's about the designers who re-examine, re-evaluate and re-invent our manufactured environment on a daily basis. It's about personal expression, identity, consumerism, and sustainability.

Rating: Unrated
Genre: Documentary, Musical & Performing Arts, Special Interest
Directed By:
In Theaters:
On DVD: Oct 13, 2009
Plexifilm - Official Site

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Critic Reviews for Objectified

All Critics (16) | Top Critics (10)

It gets you thinking.

Full Review… | June 5, 2009
Chicago Tribune
Top Critic

That's what's great about his approach: he focuses on the most mundane of subjects and makes us think about them.

Full Review… | May 22, 2009
Time Out
Top Critic

Objectified is so straightforward, sensible and thought-provoking that it alleviates that design noise instead of adding to it.

Full Review… | May 8, 2009
Top Critic

As sleek and handsome as any of the new and improved household items it exhibits.

May 8, 2009
New York Times
Top Critic

Witty, engaging and exquisitely crafted.

Full Review… | May 8, 2009
Top Critic

It provides just enough information to invite further study without going into much detail. It's an intriguing film about what goes on beneath the surface of the objects we take for granted, but one that never digs as deep as it should.

Full Review… | May 7, 2009
AV Club
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Objectified

"Objectified" is a mildly interesting documentary about design that sadly has more to do with symbolically and futilely trying to reinvent the wheel but little to do with building a better mousetrap. Actually, towards the beginning there is some focus on crafting household items, like potato peelers, that are easier for people suffering with arthritis to handle. But most of the documentary concerns the outward designs of objects to make them more palatable for consumers. While much attention is paid to the coolness of the designs, the concept of planned obsolescence is pretty much ignored. And I know creating new designs can be used to fight against an increasingly disposable world but some items were simply meant to be used and thrown away. For the record, there is one item I would run inside a fire to get and that is my DVR which is an entirely practical choice.(Sue me, I'm not sentimental.) And is a $100 pen any better than the cheap pen I used to write up this review in my one subject spiral notebook? Admittedly, we do need some variety in life, or else we're going to be on page 80 of "Brave New World." And with Smart Cars, especially the yellow ones, you have the perfect combination of efficiency, function and a funky look, to offset the ugly, gas guzzling SVU's.

Walter M.

Super Reviewer

Like a very well-produced Nova special, or a Discovery channel in-depth program, this documentary about industrial design is interesting and chatty and slightly dry. Some interesting stuff, not dull, but I like my documentaries a little more . . . grabby.

Jeff Talbott
Jeff Talbott

Super Reviewer

Darn, you already pushed the thumbs down icon and you haven?t read the review. This move is really focused for people in to the design of anything material. Having people verbalize about the creative process is like asking writers to paint about writing. The real interest is in the subtext, the people who are interviewed are obsessed with design, as I can say I am also. The though kept sneaking into my mind that none of the people interviewed have children except Marc Newsom. In the extra he explains he has a 9 mo old daughter and goes on a rant about the state of design of highchairs and other children?s goods. You can see the sleep deprivation in his eyes. There is a deep inner connection between creative drive and raising children. The most brief and most enjoyable interview is with Dieter Rams head of industrial design for Braun. Definitely catch the extended interview in the extras (yes they?re there you can only get there through the pop-up menu button). Naoto Fukasawa give some in site into Japanese asthetic in a rambling train of thought exposition. The opposite is Poala Antonelli who gives this boring academic long winded history of design, she has to be a uncreative barren and bitter designer.

Bill Cavros

Super Reviewer

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