Total Recall: Best Live-Action Disney Movies

Which of the Mouse House's family-friendly romps comes out on top?

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6. The Rookie

By 2002, the "inspirational sports movie" genre was seen as well past its prime -- and so was Dennis Quaid: one of the more bankable matinee idols of the 1980s, Quaid was suffering through a dry spell when he signed on for Disney's John Lee Hancock-directed dramatization of the brief-yet-noteworthy Major League Baseball career of high school teacher-turned-Tampa Bay Devil Ray pitcher Jimmy Morris. Like Morris himself, The Rookie was initially written off by many as an amiable relic of a bygone era -- but try as they might, most critics were too charmed by its true-life inspirational story, and Quaid's refreshingly low-key performance, to be cynical about the film. The Rookie earned a healthy return on Disney's $22 million investment, kick-started a new chapter in Quaid's career, and earned a surprising number of endorsements from critics like Looking Closer's Jeffrey Overstreet, who called it "one of those rare, wonderful 'formula' films that ... favors understatement over exaggeration, subtlety over sentimentality."


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5. The Parent Trap

For a relatively lightweight rom-com, The Parent Trap has enjoyed an incredibly long life; not only was the original film re-released to theaters seven years after its theatrical debut, but Hayley Mills ended up reprising her dual roles for a trio of made-for-TV sequels more than 20 years later -- and the career-boosting power of the story of matchmaking twins who play Cupid for their divorced parents proved every bit as potent in 1998, when Lindsay Lohan starred in a remake. Part of Trap's appeal no doubt came from its pioneering use of the trick photography that made it appear as though Mills was actually her own twin -- a technique later used to notable effect on The Patty Duke Show two years later -- but even without special effects, The Parent Trap is a solid, albeit proudly corny, film that benefits from a strong performance by its winsome star. Mills' charms were even sufficient to win over more "serious" publications, such as Time, whose reviewer wrote, "Surprisingly, the film is delightful -- mostly because of 15-year-old Hayley Mills, the blonde button nose who played the endearing delinquent in Tiger Bay."

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