Oxyana Reviews

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December 5, 2013
Its worth the watch to get a glimpse into the horrible drug-infused lives of these small town West Virginians but there's definitely something lacking from the film. We never once hear any solid facts about the drug, only skewed views from users and bystanders. There should have been some follow up interviews or at least a rehab case, showing that there is an obtainable and positive end if you try hard enough. In addition, we aren't offered any solution to the problem at all.

The "failure" of the war on drugs gets brought up at one point in the film yet its clear that this town's true problem stems from the family system and nothing else. If this film taught me anything other than the fact that drugs are bad, it's that family really does play a massive role in influencing an individual
½ October 4, 2013
Great movie, terribly sad story
½ July 8, 2013
Raw, emotional, and heartbreaking at times, Sean Dunne's Oxyana shows the struggle and loss of drug-addiction in Oceania, West Virginia, a tiny mining town that has its 1,400 citizens succumbing to Oxycontin.

With an atmospheric somber that's reminiscent to the eye-opening Kids (1995) by Larry Clark, the film depicts the struggle of addiction and plays nearly fifteen examples of life-shattering changes you would see in the first forty-five minutes of the A&E's hit-show "Intervention." While filmmaking style doesn't always hit the right chords and not offering any real resolutions or suggestions for fixing the problem, if anything, Oxyana shows the youth of the lost generation being picked off one by one as we remain helpless.

There may be no real answer at this point in time for the problem to be fully resolved. Perhaps that's Dunne's brilliance in an almost waving the white flag sort of fashion. Some of the stories of these people are horrific and you can almost see sympathize with their reasoning for drug usage through their testimonies. The film is polished enough to open the door for discussion by political and movie-goers everywhere and emotional enough to warrant a reaction.
½ July 5, 2013
"If it whatn't for drugs in this town there would be no town."

Although a stunning visual piece, Oxyana only manages to interview its subjects rather than follow them through their daily lives. We get it dope is bad and there is a lot of it in Appalachia, but as The Wild Whites of West Virginia proved, your subject is more than just a dope feen. Tell us more about about the town and how/ why Oxy became its main recourse . Don't just tell us this story through interviews alone. What is the town doing to combat this issue? It would have also been interesting to see someone go through the rehab process.
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