Pin Reviews

Page 1 of 9
TheDudeLebowski65
Super Reviewer
½ November 22, 2013
Psychological horror films are often hard to accomplish. The reason is that they have to manipulate your mind in such a way that you are genuinely afraid of what's going on on-screen. With Pin, you get exactly that, this is one of the finest examples of what psychological horror films should be. With a great cast of actors, Pin is a bone chilling film that will grab your attention from start to finish. The film boasts a very good cast and terrifying moments. This is a brilliant execution in the genre, and the psychological aspect of the movie really does stand out because the lead actor who plays Leon is so convincing. The film has some tense moments of sheer terror and it goes deep into your conscience. Leon is a paranoid Schizophrenic who thinks that Pin, an anatomically correct dummy is alive and he uses it to control his sister. The film is simple, but it's effective in showing the downfall of mental illness when it goes untreated and the result is terrifying. I was pleasantly surprised with the film, and it is one of the finest of the psychological horror genre of film. The cast are very good here, and the story is engaging, thrilling and it always leaves you on the edge of your seat. To any genre fan looking for a well crafted horror film, Pin is definitely a fine choice. This film goes deep in the human psychosis, which adds to the terror that unfolds on-screen. Now is this a masterpiece, it isn't, but it definitely one of the finer examples of psychological horror done right.
Super Reviewer
½ September 6, 2010
This horror movie is predictable and not really scary at all. It may be slightly creepy at times, but that's it. I wouldn't recommend this movie, but it's not too bad, it's so-so.
Super Reviewer
½ December 28, 2009
The eighties produced a lot of horror films that were clearly made just for people to rent on Friday nights to ignore while they had a few beers and a laugh with their mates. While most of these films were instantly forgettable, some were actually quite good and unfortunately have been forgotten along with the forgettable ones. Pin is one such film. While the movie isn't a horror classic, and it takes essential elements from a range of sources, most notably Psycho; it still represents a good success in the psychological horror sub-genre. So, if you like your films to be dark and moody; you can go wrong here! Based on a best seller by Andrew Neiderman, Pin blends the story of a young boy growing up with murderous schizophrenia to horrifying effect. The plot follows a brother and sister, Leon and Ursula, whose father uses ventriloquism and an anatomical dummy as a learning tool for his children. What he doesn't count on, however, is Leon taking this act too seriously and believing that the dummy really is alive. A childish idea that leads to a very dark future for Leon.

While the film lacks any real potent bite, it blends it's elements together with a good plot pace well enough to ensure that the film always offers compelling viewing and although the action gets a little predictable at times, we always want to carry on watching to see what happens. The dummy itself is the centrepiece of the film and director Sandor Stern has managed to create a malevolent atmosphere around it. The thing looks creepy anyway, but when combined with it's put-on voice; I can imagine it giving some more easily scared viewers nightmares. Ventriloquism is a hobby that has always lent itself well to horror movies; from the dummy tale in 'Dead of Night', to this film and more; you can always count on a creepy movie if one of it's core subjects is the act of someone lending their voice to a plastic doll. The acting in the film is typically eighties; but it's not all that bad considering the type of movie that this is. On the whole; Pin is a nice atmospheric chiller that deserves more attention, so if you get the chance to see it; I highly recommend that you do!
Super Reviewer
February 10, 2008
Weird horror flick where a medical dummy named "Pin" is the object of fear and command for a mentally unstable young man named "Leon". It's an effectively creepy flick which touched upon disturbing subjects. Not awesome enough to own on DVD however.
themoviewaffler.com
Super Reviewer
½ December 7, 2013
A psychosexual horror thriller about an anatomically correct anatomy medical dummy should be loads of tacky fun. In the hands of Sandor Stern's stolid direction we get a thriller melodrama that is a crossbreed of Psycho and Magic with the syrupy sheen of a made for TV Hallmark film.
Based on the novel by Andrew Neiderman (who also wrote "John Grisham meets The Omen" thriller Devil's Advocate, which itself was loosely readapted for film as an Al Pacino blackly comic ham-fest), Pin tells the story of Ursula (Preston) and Leon (Hewlett), raised in quiet suburban seclusion by their father Dr Linden (O'Quinn) and mother (Mantel). Dr Linden has a facility with ventriloquism which he uses to give a voice and character to Pin, the anatomist dummy in his office. By turns enrapturing his children and using Pin as a means of bestowing wisdom and lessons, all is well. However, as the Linden children grew up, Ursula may have developed a taste for parties and teenage sexual encounters, but Leon has grown an unhealthy attachment to Pin that may spark into tragedy.

The loss of identity and split personality themes fit the thriller genre like a glove; De Palma has pretty much made a career out of it. Pin may tread well worn ground, but it does develop its characters and has a genuine air of melancholy. This is a movie where the writing is much better than the direction. Stern is an old hand at television and in this, his only cinema release, he doesn't transcend the medium; the whole movie feels shackled. It politely mumbles itself through such queasy scenes as Leon witnessing his own sisters abortion performed by their father, and the increasingly unhealthy sibling relationship is too discreet, as if in fear of losing a TV sponsor. Ursula may also be the most wholesome good time girl in all of cinema; when Stern does embrace bad taste with a scene involving a nurse having sex with Pin (which implies he's anatomically correct in all the right places) we get a hint of the febrile psychosexual delight this could have been.

Its failings as a horror movie are also what differentiates it from most of its ilk. By empathizing so deeply with Leon it stages events as tragedy, a gradual erosion of the person with every act he commits, rather than horror set piece. Leon may be doing monstrous things but he is never viewed as a monster. The performances are all uniformly good, although O'Quinn has a hard time removing the shackles of The Stepfather, his doctor father here seeming just a little too sinister.
In the end this is a tragedy hiding in horror clothing, a film ending on a grace note of sadness rather than winking at a possible sequel. You just wish it was directed with a little more brio. Like its lead actress, it wants to be slutty but is a little too Laura Ashley for its own good.
(Review by Jason Abbey)
John2223
Super Reviewer
January 14, 2010
I caught this movie in a list about great horror movies you've never seen, however, after watching this movie I was unimpressed; it is a interesting slow burn psychological thrillers that is mildly creepy and at times bizarre but "Pin", in my opinion, it is not a great film as stated in that list only a decent horror flick.

Remake is in work by the same director.
Super Reviewer
½ September 6, 2008
Pin is the story of a dummy yes a actual dummy that two kids grow up knowing as almost one of the family since there father a doctor uses it to explain certain things and even has a voice for it fast forward threw the years and the kids grow up one of them normal a sister and the brother who is very strange when the parents die the brother takes over the voice of Pin and uses it to kill people. Very creepy movie worth seeing just to watch the brother interact with the dummy and how he slowly goes even crezier threw time.
Super Reviewer
½ October 20, 2007
Very freaky movie - turned out to be a psychological thriller which is sometimes much scarier.
½ May 9, 2009
This movie wasn't scary at all, it didn't even creep me out, not even at the end. I found it to be predictable and a lot like some other movies I've seen. It really is a good movie to teach people how not to parent: do not give your kids advice by having them talk to a doll, that just messes them up! I would not wish such unbalanced parents on any kid. Overall, this movie just didn't grab me.
January 19, 2010
Surprisingly effective tale of a young man's fractured personality taking on the persona of his deceased father's medical dummy, which he'd used as a ventriloquist's dummy.

This kid has issues from the word go, but the really strange part is that no one notices as he starts speaking to the damned dummy like it's his buddy or something, and when he reaches the age of 18 and still obviously thinks that the dummy is real, SOMEONE should have stepped in, y'know?

Never scary per se, but has some creepy moments just because the Leon character is so unnerving as he speaks about the dummy.

Worth a rental.
December 6, 2009
It?s certainly creepy. The cast does a good job, especially David Hewlett. Fine score, it has some really tense and interesting scenes. Good pacing and it does a good job with the low budget.
June 11, 2009
Weird little film. What happens when one sibling (Or shall I say gender?) is preferred over another one. The psychological errors that can be inflicted upon the isolated ones. The ambiguity carries the film for a while, later it becomes a little cliche and predictable. The voice for the sex ed doll is perfectly chilling, and he's a sex ed doll for a reason.
½ June 2, 2008
The scariest part of this movie is the creepy relationship between brother and sister. I watched it. You can watch it if you can be bothered. It's not horrible or anything.
½ May 16, 2008
While it's a little too much like "Magic" and anything else
we've ever seen about a ventriloquist who's got reality issues, the acting is superb and makes this movie extremely watchable, even if you feel pretty sure you know where it's going.
July 6, 2015
While not scary, it more than meets the criteria to be creepy
½ April 17, 2014
Thursday, April 17, 2014

(1988) Pin
PSYCHOLOGICAL HORROR DRAMA

I tried to watch this for a second attempt so that I can post a review on here, but for some reason, it's much more unbearable to watch for a second time. Co-written and directed by Sandor Stern adapting the Andrew Neiderman novel, which from the movie standpoint has many familiar remnants to "Psycho" as well as other William Castle classics.

Nothing really happens until the very end which the mute thing that's on the wheel chair seen from on the window from outside may not be what it appears to be. It's quite drab and dull.

2 out of 4 stars
themoviewaffler.com
Super Reviewer
½ December 7, 2013
A psychosexual horror thriller about an anatomically correct anatomy medical dummy should be loads of tacky fun. In the hands of Sandor Stern's stolid direction we get a thriller melodrama that is a crossbreed of Psycho and Magic with the syrupy sheen of a made for TV Hallmark film.
Based on the novel by Andrew Neiderman (who also wrote "John Grisham meets The Omen" thriller Devil's Advocate, which itself was loosely readapted for film as an Al Pacino blackly comic ham-fest), Pin tells the story of Ursula (Preston) and Leon (Hewlett), raised in quiet suburban seclusion by their father Dr Linden (O'Quinn) and mother (Mantel). Dr Linden has a facility with ventriloquism which he uses to give a voice and character to Pin, the anatomist dummy in his office. By turns enrapturing his children and using Pin as a means of bestowing wisdom and lessons, all is well. However, as the Linden children grew up, Ursula may have developed a taste for parties and teenage sexual encounters, but Leon has grown an unhealthy attachment to Pin that may spark into tragedy.

The loss of identity and split personality themes fit the thriller genre like a glove; De Palma has pretty much made a career out of it. Pin may tread well worn ground, but it does develop its characters and has a genuine air of melancholy. This is a movie where the writing is much better than the direction. Stern is an old hand at television and in this, his only cinema release, he doesn't transcend the medium; the whole movie feels shackled. It politely mumbles itself through such queasy scenes as Leon witnessing his own sisters abortion performed by their father, and the increasingly unhealthy sibling relationship is too discreet, as if in fear of losing a TV sponsor. Ursula may also be the most wholesome good time girl in all of cinema; when Stern does embrace bad taste with a scene involving a nurse having sex with Pin (which implies he's anatomically correct in all the right places) we get a hint of the febrile psychosexual delight this could have been.

Its failings as a horror movie are also what differentiates it from most of its ilk. By empathizing so deeply with Leon it stages events as tragedy, a gradual erosion of the person with every act he commits, rather than horror set piece. Leon may be doing monstrous things but he is never viewed as a monster. The performances are all uniformly good, although O'Quinn has a hard time removing the shackles of The Stepfather, his doctor father here seeming just a little too sinister.
In the end this is a tragedy hiding in horror clothing, a film ending on a grace note of sadness rather than winking at a possible sequel. You just wish it was directed with a little more brio. Like its lead actress, it wants to be slutty but is a little too Laura Ashley for its own good.
(Review by Jason Abbey)
October 13, 2013
It's not a great horror film, but it has a pretty original plot and is worth a watch.
December 9, 2012
On Netflix Instant Watch, this is an original, creepy, unsettling and well-done little psychological tale of family matters gone wrong. Good '80s stuff!
Page 1 of 9