Five Favorite Films with Anna Kendrick

The Pitch Perfect star also chats about her new movie, her love of cinema, and understanding a cappella geekdom.

Every once in a while, a few young actors and actresses emerge who help reassure us all that Hollywood is in good hands. Anna Kendrick, whose latest film Pitch Perfect expands into wide release this week, belongs on that short list. After securing a supporting role in the continuing pop culture phenomenon that is The Twilight Saga, Kendrick went on to nab an Oscar nomination for her superb work alongside George Clooney and Vera Farmiga in Jason Reitman's Up in the Air. That breakout performance led to roles in widely praised films like Scott Pilgrim vs. The World and 50/50, and while she currently appears in three movies out in theaters, she has yet another -- Robert Redford's The Company You Keep -- set to open in November. In other words, she's doing pretty well for herself.

Last week, RT chatted with Anna about Pitch Perfect, in which she plays an aspiring electronic music producer who joins her college's all female a cappella group and helps turn the team into a winner. But first, of course, she gave us her Five Favorite Films, and being that she's a huge movie fan, we think you'll enjoy the variety in her choices.


The Women (George Cukor, 1939; 90% Tomatometer)

This has been my favorite film since I was twelve years old. I'm pretty sure I could recite it in its entirety. It has a wildly funny all female cast and a female writer. I revisit it almost every year and my appreciation for the performances and the writing grows.




Hot Fuzz (Edgar Wright, 2006; 91% Tomatometer)

When I first saw this in the theater I remember laughing my ass off and then realizing it was also the best action movie I'd seen in a long time. I love that it's a love letter to action and not a spoof. It also has some of the best and fastest comedic dialogue ever.




Wet Hot American Summer (David Wain, 2001, 31% Tomatometer)

The first time I watched this movie was with a group of friends who are obsessed with it. I asked to watch it again the following three nights. It's absurd, it has the most amazing cast, and it's infinitely quotable. It's a perfect desert island movie.




Winter Light (Ingmar Bergman, 1962; 80% Tomatometer)

I love all the Bergman films I've seen, but this spoke to me personally in a really profound way. I remember feeling very shaken after watching it. I feel like the greatest thing a writer or filmmaker can do is say something so honest that most people wouldn't be brave enough and that's what I love about this film. The characters are deeply flawed and sometimes very ugly to each other, but that's why it's so effective.




Love and Death (Woody Allen, 2003; 100% Tomatometer)

I know this is not the best Woody Allen film I've ever seen, but it's still my personal favorite. Only Woody Allen could mix highbrow Bergman homages and Marx Brothers-esque slapstick. I also love how much fun he seems to be having with the great Diane Keaton. If only there were a blooper reel.



Next, Kendrick talks about collegiate a cappella, being a drama geek, and fainting on stage.

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