Total Recall: Not-So-Happy Movie Thanksgivings

We celebrate Turkey Day with a rundown of some of the most memorably awkward holiday flicks ever.

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Everyone has the day off work, there's a big bird on the table, and relatives you haven't seen in awhile are sitting around watching the Lions lose their twelfth game of the season. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

Now, obviously, Thanksgiving doesn't have quite the rich cinematic tradition that certain other holidays have enjoyed, but we've still watched the fourth Thursday in November unfold on the big screen enough times to be able to devote this week's Total Recall to our annual celebration of parades and good eats -- specifically, to some of the most noteworthy not-so-thankful Thanksgivings in movie history. We've gathered together an eclectic group for our list, including old favorites (Hannah and Her Sisters), indie upstarts (The House of Yes), and even a critical dud or two. Plus, as a special bonus, we've included the trailer for a movie that never was -- so tuck in your napkins, wait for Sis to say grace, and let's all dig in!

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10. Addams Family Values

For many, the Addams Family movies trigger memories of MC Hammer more than anything else, but 1993's Addams Family Values actually received better reviews than its predecessor -- and it's also noteworthy for containing one of the most hysterical Thanksgiving pageants in movie history, one which begins with turkeys singing "Eat me!" and culminates with Christina Ricci's Wednesday Addams, playing Pochahontas, departing from the script written by unctuous summer camp director Gary Granger (played by Peter MacNicol) to air a list of grievances against the pilgrims before directing her tribe to burn their village to the ground. It might read like a tryptophan-induced dream of Howard Zinn's, but it's actually very funny -- and certainly a big part of why the Chicago Reader's Jonathan Rosenbaum called Addams Family Values "one of the funniest, most mean-spirited satirical assaults on sunny American values since the salad days of W.C. Fields."

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9. Alice's Restaurant

Only in the 1960s could an 18-minute talking blues song by a 19-year-old white kid from New England become such a big hit that it inspired a movie helmed by an A-list director like Arthur Penn, but that's exactly what happened with Arlo Guthrie's "Alice's Restaurant," the rambling tale of how it came to pass that a pair of Massachusetts hippies found themselves dragged to court for illegally dumping garbage on Thanksgiving Day -- only to watch the arresting officer break down in tears of frustration when he discovers that the presiding judge is blind and can't see the glossy color photos meticulously taken of the scene of the crime. And you thought you had it bad, watching the parade on your grandmother's couch! As a movie, Alice's Restaurant is arguably most interesting as a 1960s relic, or an early example of meta filmmaking (the real-life Alice makes a cameo, and officer William "Obie" Obanhein stars as himself), but critics have been generally kind to it; as Roger Ebert succinctly put it, the movie is "good work in a minor key.".