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Plus Tard (One Day You'll Understand) (Later) (2008)

tomatometer

86

Average Rating: 7.1/10
Critic Reviews: 14
Fresh: 12 | Rotten: 2

No consensus yet.

audience

53

liked it
Average Rating: 3.1/5
User Ratings: 219

My Rating

Movie Info

A middle-aged man studying the Mur des Noms in modern-day France recalls the time 20 years prior when he and his mother were viewing the trial of Klaus Barbie with rapt attention in this introspective drama from director Amos Gitai. The year was 1987, and Rivka lived with her son, Victor, in a disheveled apartment littered with antiques and memorabilia. The opening session in the trial against the so-called "butcher of Lyon" is being televised, and Rivka is struggling to keep her emotions under

Unrated,

Art House & International, Drama

Aug 11, 2009

Kino International - Official Site External Icon

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All Critics (23) | Top Critics (14) | Fresh (15) | Rotten (8)

[Director] Gitai works here from Jérôme Clément's 2005 book about his mother. He whips something rich and delicate out of the story's dramatic spareness.

July 23, 2009 Full Review Source: Boston Globe
Boston Globe
Top Critic IconTop Critic

The intelligence and commitment of One Day You'll Understand can't be doubted, but as drama, the film barely registers.

February 27, 2009 Full Review Source: San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco Chronicle
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The chance to watch the grand Jeanne Moreau is this flat memoir's saving grace.

December 5, 2008 Full Review Source: Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
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One Day You'll Understand is not exclusively a picture about the Holocaust. It is about a contradiction: human discomfort with some truths and human hunger for them.

November 20, 2008 Full Review Source: The New Republic
The New Republic
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This is not a movie of big, dramatic revelations; in fact, the notionally elusive truth is pretty obvious from the movie's outset, which makes Victor's quest less about facts and more about principles.

November 13, 2008 Full Review Source: Chicago Tribune
Chicago Tribune
Top Critic IconTop Critic

Nonetheless, this mesmerizing, flawed, almost Proustian meditation has more to do with the present than the past.

November 7, 2008 Full Review Source: Salon.com
Salon.com
Top Critic IconTop Critic

Israeli director Amos Gitai can be one of the world's most graceful and effective filmmakers, but he's equally susceptible to ham-fisted episodes, and his new film is one of them.

November 6, 2008 Full Review Source: Combustible Celluloid
Combustible Celluloid

Despite the back and forth between awkward and moving, unsubtle and touching, Gitai does make a strong case for personal reexaminations of the past.

October 31, 2008 Full Review Source: Film-Forward.com
Film-Forward.com

Accurate in imaging the mystery of man's not fully knowable past, 'One Day You'll Understand' leaves too much distant, unsolved and confused.

October 30, 2008 Full Review Source: ReelTalk Movie Reviews
ReelTalk Movie Reviews

Drama about a French Jewish family's suffering, secrets, and denials regarding Nazi persecution during the French Occupation is an often disorienting collage of memory shards. But the legendary Jeanne Moreau and other excellent cast help hold interest.

October 30, 2008 Full Review Source: Film Journal International
Film Journal International

In under 20 minutes of screen time, Jeanne Moreau supplies One Day You'll Understand with an otherwise absent emotional weight of reconciliation to the anguished history of WWII France.

October 26, 2008 Full Review Source: Slant Magazine
Slant Magazine

Inert performances, an irritating soundtrack, and the lack of resonance of the 'big secret' combine to make viewing a burden.

October 14, 2008 Full Review Source: Compuserve
Compuserve

...Gitai's penchant for going off on head-scratching tangents is certainly in full force here.

September 8, 2008 Full Review Source: Reel Film Reviews
Reel Film Reviews

Audience Reviews for Plus Tard (One Day You'll Understand) (Later)

[font=Century Gothic]Directed by Amos Gitai, "One Day You'll Understand" is an intelligent, intriguing but not entirely successful movie set in 1987 around the time of the Klaus Barbie trial. Victor Bastien(Hippolyte Girardot) has a personal stake in the proceedings as his maternal grandparents died in the Holocaust while their daughter Rivka(Jeanne Moreau) survived.(It is strange that with a movie like Victor that is so obsessed with personal details, that her survival is never quite explained.) While focusing on beautiful moments and camera movements, there is very little story to speak of. Using the trial as a focus is not a bad idea to explore France's role in the Holocaust, but it was 17 years after the making of the very thorough "The Sorrow and the Pity." It is a shame considering what the movie has to say about identity in the wake of Rivka, of Russian Jewish heritage, marrying into a Catholic family and the effect this eventually has on her children. And like "The Sweet Hereafter," the movie brings up the notion that those who are obsessed with history were never there in the first place, while those who lived through it do not have to be constantly reminded of the fact. For example, Rivka seems particularly comfortable with the antiques she owns. In the end, the past may be a nice place to visit but it is the present where it is best to stay.[/font]
November 17, 2008
Harlequin68
Walter M.

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Foreign Titles

  • One Day You'll Understand (Plus tard tu comprendras) (DE)
  • One Day You'll Understand (Plus tard tu comprendras) (UK)
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