Post Tenebras Lux Reviews

Page 3 of 3
Angie Errigo
Empire Magazine
March 17, 2013
Reygadas' big ideas translate with mixed results.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
Kevin Harley
Total Film
March 15, 2013
Some metaphors score and some miss, but this is leap-of-faith cinema: the rewards entail some risks.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Emanuel Levy
EmanuelLevy.Com
February 26, 2013
Ambitious (and pretentious) to afault, Reygadas' latest feature contains some haunting imagery but is frustrating from a narrative standpoint.
Full Review | Original Score: C
Marc Mohan
Oregonian
February 21, 2013
There's visual poetry here, in small doses, but it doesn't take long for one's patience to run out.
Full Review | Original Score: C
Charlie Lyne
Ultra Culture
July 6, 2012
Boasts some incredible scenes.
David Jenkins
Little White Lies
May 24, 2012
It pains us to say that Post Tenebras Lux leaves you in a state of chilly bemusement rather than breathless rapture.
Top Critic
Geoff Andrew
Time Out
May 24, 2012
Yet again, one senses that Reygadas - instead of simply getting on with the job of making a film - has opted instead to go for an opus magnum that reminds us of cinema's greats
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
Robbie Collin
Daily Telegraph
May 24, 2012
Dreary family drama goes on to dominate what could almost be described as the plot, and mid-film sorties into a cheerless sex club and a rugby match at an English secondary school are as bamboozling in isolation as they are in context.
Top Critic
Jay Weissberg
Variety
May 24, 2012
The title, signifying "light after darkness," derives from the Latin translation of the Book of Job, an appropriate source given that a considerable amount of the prophet's proverbial patience is required.
Jonathan Romney
Screen International
May 24, 2012
There is a vision here, certainly, but the film feels genuinely, bracingly experimental in that it seems to be searching for its own meaning and form, rather than asserting them ready-made.
Xan Brooks
Guardian
May 24, 2012
Reygadas has elected to shoot large portions of his film through a bevelled camera lens, which refracts his figures, doubles the image and leaves the screen's borders blurred. I have no doubt he is deliberately setting out to vex us.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
Page 3 of 3