Puppet Reviews

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April 17, 2012
Could not disagree more with poster gina marie. Obviously, different folks are interested in different things, but I especially enjoyed Puppet when it followed the preparation and rehearsal for the Disfarmer show. The film keeps the pace brisk and we hear from Hurlin and follow his research and his puppet-making process, watch the performers rehearse, and follow the rising anxiety over the forthcoming reviews. And, the idea that just anyone with a camera could capture this footage is, well, disrespectful. The photography in Puppet is beautiful while often understated, well composed and well lit. Find this film and watch it. You'll love it.
½ May 14, 2011
I never fall asleep at the theater, but god this movie was boring... it was a STRUGGLE to keep my eyes open. The film starts off fascinating; discussing puppetry in America, and the history of puppetry, along with it's social uses in other countries. Most of this is conveyed by interviewees from the world of puppetry and anthropology. Then, we begin to follow puppeteer Dan Hurlin and the production of his puppet play "Disfarmer". Dan himself has an interesting story. He is considered a leader in what is happening in American puppetry, however his last play faired poorly after a negative review in the New York times. This exemplifies the idea that puppetry is an art form that may not be as appreciated as others. As the film goes on it becomes more of a long, drawn out, bonus feature on a dvd for the play Disfarmer. This is what I didn't care for. There were some breath taking shots of inanimate objects looking like living breathing people, and the puppeteers are really masters at their craft. Disfarmer is probably even a fantastic play. But this documentary was torture, it was so slow that it stopped informing me and just started showing me footage. I could have taken a flip camera and hung out backstage at the show and practically had the same footage.
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