Total Recall: James Bond Countdown -- Find Out Where Quantum of Solace Fits In!

We rank every 007 adventure by Tomatometer.

50%

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21. The Man with the Golden Gun (50%)

Roger Moore's second Bond film, The Man with the Golden Gun, was one of the series' lowest-grossing pictures, and reaffirmed suspicions that the franchise was going for a campier tone. The title character is Francisco Scaramanga (Christopher Lee), a renowned assassin with a distinctive sidearm; Bond tracks him to his hideout in Hong Kong, where he has designs on world domination. If the title is any indication, this is a wink-wink, nudge-nudge affair, with double-entendre-laden dialogue, a noteworthy lack of mechanics, and a villain that overshadows Bond. "The best Bonds," wrote Time Magazine's Jay Cocks, "were sly without quite getting silly. The best Bonds also had Sean Connery, whose absence is sorely felt here."


52%

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20. The World is Not Enough (52%)

The World is Not Enough typifies one of the main problems with modern Bond: how does this iconic action hero stand out in the modern era? By going bigger and louder, and replacing the suave cool of the character with wall-to-wall effects and high-tech flash. In doing so, however, many felt like 007 got lost in the shuffle. In this, the worst-reviewed of the Pierce Brosnan Bonds, 007 must protect oil heiress Elektra King (Sophie Marceau) from Russian terrorist Renard (Robert Carlyle), an anarchist behind a complex scheme to upset the world's oil supply. The critical reaction to World was pretty lukewarm, with a number of critics suggesting that the Bond franchise was on its last legs; as Charles Taylor of Salon.com wrote, "Somewhere along the way the people behind the series stopped thinking of Bond movies as comic books for adults and began thinking of them as action movies."


56%

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19. Tomorrow Never Dies (56%)

If GoldenEye looked like a bold new beginning for the Bond franchise, Tomorrow Never Dies found the series playing it safe again. True, Dies has its share of magnificent stunts, and Hong Kong action star Michelle Yeoh made for a welcome addition. However, it was more action-packed than character-driven, and generally generic. Jonathan Pryce plays an evil media mogul who wants to trigger global conflict to boost the ratings of his cable television channel; he's also shacking up with 007's ex (Teri Hatcher), so Bond's mission is hardly dispassionate. Loaded with product placement, Tomorrow Never Dies was hardly a bad action movie, but critics had come to expect more from a Bond flick. "Michelle Yeoh is a standout in an otherwise by-the-numbers entry in this not-so-gracefully ageing series," wrote Dan Jardine of Apollo Film Guide.

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