Daltry Calhoun Reviews

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Time Out
November 17, 2011
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Stephen Garrett
Time Out
August 16, 2007
The movie has its flaws, but they are few and forgivable.
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Jan Stuart
Newsday
November 4, 2005
Southern whimsy, when handled delicately, can produce a precious jewel a la Junebug. In less skillful hands, it can be merely precious.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Lou Lumenick
New York Post
November 4, 2005
Knoxville tries hard and exudes a certain likability, but can't really handle big dramatic moments at this point in his career.
| Original Score: 2/4
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Jami Bernard
New York Daily News
November 4, 2005
A weird, unpleasant little movie.
Full Review | Original Score: 1/4
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Laura Kern
New York Times
November 3, 2005
Although the film starts off somewhat amusingly, the first-time feature director Katrina Holden Bronson seems to have spent more energy assembling the overbearing soundtrack than expanding on her characters' fractured relationships.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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Benjamin Strong
Village Voice
November 1, 2005
Anyone looking for a paean to the unnatural allure of a sprinklered lawn can see that the grass is greener in Blue Velvet.
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Robert Koehler
Variety
October 5, 2005
A string of scenes in search of a movie.
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Sheri Linden
Hollywood Reporter
September 23, 2005
Aims for whimsy and poignancy and mostly comes up empty.
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Philip Wuntch
Dallas Morning News
September 22, 2005
If director and screenwriter Katrina Holden Bronson intended some moments as irony, the film lacks the necessary finesse for such an elusive quality.
Full Review | Original Score: C+
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Kevin Crust
Los Angeles Times
September 22, 2005
Bronson attempts to wring some unearned emotional redemption from her dimwitted characters, but the faux-Southern sincerity and June's incessant voice-over prove too annoying.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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Mark Olsen
L.A. Weekly
September 22, 2005
This is the kind of smug, listless product that the world, indie or otherwise, would be better off without.