• R, 2 hr. 2 min.
  • Comedy
  • Directed By:
    David O. Russell
    In Theaters:
    Nov 21, 2012 Wide
    On DVD:
    Apr 30, 2013
  • The Weinstein Company

Instantly annoyed by this film and I haven't even seen it.

I have not seen this and I'm already annoyed by it. (Yes, I know I will be attacked for writing a review without actually having seen it!)

Let me explain myself. If you think this is a serious meditation on "mental illness", that somehow Hollywood and these actors took a "risk" and "stepped out of the box" to try to give weight and insight into a subject not oft broached by media, let me just tell you a few things:

1) The idea of two super good-looking actors, one the "sexist man alive" and the other uber hot and sexy in Jennifer Lawerence, portraying characters in a supposedly "serious" take on mental illness, is an immediate indicator that this is not a serious film.

2) From what I've gleaned from the film -- and I don't know all the details -- the characters don't appear to have jobs, live with their parents, "middle class" parents who seem to live awfully comfortably. This just smacks of a film not taking any serious risks or trying very hard. It gives the two main leads plenty of time to gallivant around and ham it up.

3) Its take on mental illness and bi-polar disorder already sounds trite from what I've read. I spent many years dealing with my mother who had bi-polar disorder (which I still think is a label used by the psychiatric community rather than anything grounded in hard science.) If the film really wanted to take a risk, they might look at the billions in pills psychiatrists push and peddle to naive patients, and the often lifetime of dependency and serious side effects these drugs cause. Of course, some drugs do work, and some cases do require medication, but it has become a cash cow -- and now what might otherwise be a guy who is just a little emotionally unhinged after his wife cheated on him, and not really mature enough to be able to handle it, is now "bi-polar".

4) The rom-com silliness that happens at the end has nothing to do with the actual REALITY of mental illness, which very rarely ends with a happy ending.

Again, if it's a film made to entertain, I have no problem with that -- but it is being regarded and marketed by idiots who have no idea what they are talking about as a "serious" film, somehow a possible Oscar contender for Best Picture.

Of course, I have NOT seen this film, and I may even enjoy if I see it -- I probably will, because David O. Russell usually puts out a good product -- but let's not confuse what this really is: cheap escapism and hi-jinks, Hollywood trying to be serious and laughably failing. It's enough these morons feel the need to regale themselves with numerous televised award shows that they have to slap themselves on the backs for doing something "serious". Just... stop giving these idiots your money and give it to a local theater group instead.
Porcupine Glenn
02-11-2013 11:25 PM

Thread Replies

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Leanne D.

Leanne Driscoll

I think you'll enjoy the book better, it is smart, makes you think about issues, and doesn't come to ridiculous conclusions. In the book the ending is positive too, but so much better thought out, fits with rest of novel.

Jun 22 - 04:54 PM

Leanne D.

Leanne Driscoll

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/silver_linings_playbook/forum/?threadid=328205237
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/silver_linings_playbook/forum/?threadid=328205249
They made this movie so that it could be relatable to many people, everyday people, that is why it can't be that realistic of a portrait of the mentally ill, because not all these people can relate to them

Jun 22 - 04:52 PM

Leanne D.

Leanne Driscoll

Overrated film indeed. I'm saying it's ok, but rated much too highly. Glenn I really appreciate and agree with some of your points. Especially point three, I mean in the film, even the filmmakers themselves said that Pat is undiagnosed, it was never confirmed, it is the audience's conclusions. I read other posts and finally some people realize that, so many people aren't even paying attention to detail to the actual storyline.

Jun 22 - 04:47 PM

Nick  H.

Nick Holden

consider it that pat is un-diagnosed bipolar, they still remained sensitive on the subject... most of this "it's such a true portrait of bi-polar disorder" bull is due to people in audience thinking that... the film-makers themselves didn't even say that.. consider it a fault of people always wanting to come to conclusions.. and a result of some hype...

Jun 20 - 09:18 PM

Linda Borger

Linda Borger

Lighten up, see the film and be VERY pleasantly surprised. P.S. And I'm from a family chock-full of mental illness -- from anxiety to depression to suicide. Go figure.

May 27 - 10:07 AM

Glenn Higley

Glenn Higley

I was annoyed enough by the trailer, but after a friend asked it for their birthday, I thought I'd see it. Wow. Awful. I'll be sure to vet her film recommendations carefully in the future. You definitely made the the right decision Porcupine Glenn!

May 23 - 11:37 AM

Glenn Higley

Glenn Higley

I was annoyed enough by the trailer, but after a friend asked it for their birthday, I thought I'd see it. Wow. Awful. I'll be sure to vet her film recommendations carefully in the future.

May 23 - 11:35 AM

Steve Ibarra

Steve Ibarra

What was wrong with it?

May 27 - 02:28 AM

Jim Newcombe

Jim Newcombe

It was overrated...

May 18 - 02:06 PM

Jacob Miller

Jacob Miller

See it and then try to tell me your annoyed by it.

May 14 - 06:29 PM

Mark Perry

Mark Perry

If your dumbass hasn't seen the film, then just shut up.

May 14 - 05:36 PM

Sean Gall

Sean Gall

To write a review and openly admit in said review that you dont know what you are talking about, then proceed to make completely un-based assumption about said movie show me that there is something deep and emotional for you that the idea of this movie triggers, even though you wouldnt know because youve never seen it.
You seem scared of it, not sure why.

May 13 - 03:19 PM

Sean Gall

Sean Gall

To write a review and openly admit in said review that you dont know what you are talking about, then proceed to make completely un-based assumption about said movie show me that there is something deep and emotional for you that the idea of this movie triggers, even though you would know because youve never seen it.
You seem scared of it, not sure why.

May 13 - 03:19 PM

Justin H.

Justin Hovey

You shouldn't review a movie before you have actually seen it, that's like me saying you have green eyes, when I have never seen you in my life

Mar 18 - 03:51 PM

Martin Araneta

Martin Araneta

It's best that you don't waste your time watching this film so you don't have any reason to waste any of our time reading what you have to write about a film that you really don't want to waste your time watching.

Mar 11 - 07:49 AM

John Manglaviti

John Manglaviti

tl;dr. If you're instantly annoyed by a movie you haven't seen, how do you get by with your day to day life?

Mar 10 - 05:52 PM

anita d.

anita dollens

Dear Captain Porcupine: You were absolutely correct in the first place, you deserved to be attacked for speaking out against a film you haven't even seen. Shame on you sir! You Probably should have proofread your letter as well before hitting the "send" button seeing as I believe you meant to refer to Bradley Cooper as the "sexiest" man alive not the "sexist" man alive which only gave you further lack of credibility and showed your reader (me) that you couldn't even be bothered to learn how to spell, let alone take the trouble to write something as important as a screenplay addressing a subject such as mental illness. I thought that David O Russell handled the topic with the perfect amount of thoughtfulness peppered with a few moments of humor for idiot laymen such as myself who cannot handle too many hours of tears in a row due to my own issues with depression. You Captain Porcupine are the loser here for not taking the time to see a sweet, little film about a very sobering topic brought to the mainstream by some tremendously powerful actors at the top of their game. Again, shame on you for speaking out on something you haven't seen. A lot of people worked very hard on this project and believed in it and for you to spit on it not having even seen it from your lazy boy is despicable. Grow up and get a real job.

Feb 23 - 11:07 PM

Porcupine Glenn

Porcupine Glenn

Right, I'm illiterate because I misspelled "sexiest"? Obviously a typo, Captain I Take Myself Too Seriously.

My points have been made and they stand on their own. The film is a trite popcorn flick and not a serious exploration, because it doesn't take serious risks.

Feb 24 - 01:25 PM

Petr Fritter

Petr Fritter

We should consider that this is David O. Russells take on a story which only PARTIALLY has to do with psychological disorders. Even with Hollywood involved, done with it all that it may have, its still HIS amalgamation and vision. I think the fact that it provoked your response already makes it an accomplished work :) My mother deals with real mental disorders, which have been untreated as she refuses to go to get help due to denial....Yet, I love the film. I also don't understand why perceived "hot actors" can't act seriously? Can you not take a beautiful woman seriously? The middle class family setting was most likely an attempt to make the film relatable and 'normal', along with the fact that these two individuals weren't SEVERELY damaged by their disorders, which is rather realistic to me, as most REAL people can still go about their daily routines quite successfully if diagnosed. The rom com silliness is also simply a metaphor for a happy ending, and being positive about life, something that REAL diagnosed individuals must do in order to recover, shouldn't they? All on our own accord though :)

Feb 17 - 04:11 AM

Sara K.

Sara Kennedy

Since you haven't seen the film, it might be a little too soon for you to criticize how accurately they portray bi-polar disorder, and whether or not Cooper's character is bi-polar. Compared to a lot of other films that have touched on the subject, this one actually did a pretty good job portraying it. Also, the reason that neither of them have a job is explained. And what does their being attractive have to do with anything? Attractive people can't realistically have mental disorders?

Feb 16 - 05:21 PM

Nichola Ryan

Nichola Ryan

I think you are right on the money - don't waste your precious time seeing this stupid film

Feb 15 - 04:20 AM

Hannah T.

Hannah T

I think it's best to go into a film knowing as little about it as possible. I think your reading and hearing about it may not have served you well in this case. As to your points *spoilers*:

1) So...in order to be taken seriously you have to be unattractive? Where is that written down.

2) They are middle class. The father lost his job and is currently making money in less than legal ways. As for the protagonist, he just got out of a mental institution and the "love interest" just got fired from her job. Their houses don't look that fancy...and again there is the implication from you that people of the middle or upper classes can't have serious things going on in their lives.

3) The various medications are discussed.

4) Concerning the happy ending...I actually liked that and felt that it fit in well. In the very beginning of the movie, the main character reads "A farewell to arms" and is very upset by the fact that after all the terrible things the protagonist goes through, his love dies at the end. Then Bradley Cooper's character laments that people always write stories that end sadly and wishes the author had stopped the story when everything seemed happy. I view the ending of this movie as a happy moment. One happy moment that doesn't absolve all problems current and past or ensure future happiness. Instead it shows simply that even when life isn't perfect, there can be happiness.

Feb 13 - 12:29 PM

Natalie Moore

Natalie Moore

agree

Feb 14 - 06:25 PM

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