Somewhere Reviews

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May 28, 2015
Sofia Coppola's soporific movies obviously aren't for everyone, but you should give them a chance. You're missing out. Like Lost in Translation, Somewhere is a deeply moving tale of a lost Hollywood actor and the joy his daughter brings to him. The meaning is in the scene. Watch how Stephen Dorff's character gazes at his daughter ice skating. Notice the subtle difference in his expression.
½ May 4, 2015
It took me near to three and a half hours to finish it. The movie very slowly approached it's plot, which very much like the ending, was extremely unclear. However, I did very much enjoy the characters, no matter how cliche they were. If anything, the relationship between father and daughter is what saved the whole film. It made me desperately wonder what life with a father would be like. But enough about me. Still so, I am left with far too many questions and no answers what so ever except just how shitty staying at the Chateau Marmont actually is.
½ February 12, 2015
'Somewhere' is an odd film. While it no doubt has some underlying themes that are similar to some of Coppola's previous work, it thankfully has enough to stand on its own. It's quite bold too, no dialogue is spoken for around a 1/7 of it and very little happens, it's all the well written character interactions that make it what it is but I would have liked some more. It's odd but it seems like the synopsis on most websites for what this film is about doesn't even happen until 40 minutes in, which surprised me, I understand you're supposed to have build up but it got a little much at some points and even when the synopsis does happen, it isn't for very long. I don't have problem with it though, I've seen films that haven't had their main plot kick in until an hour in and I like that approach, it's unique.

While we don't always need to relate to enjoy a film, it's naturally hard to feel sorry for an actor and his situation because people can't directly relate but whereas 'Lost in Translation' absolutely nailed that predicament, this film never got as close. I was never bored watching the film though and it went by very quickly, it's just that I felt distant and wished it had more of this excellent relationship. The relationship between father and daughter, when it happens, is excellently written and very natural, the actors actually spent some time together before filming and it seems to echo home for Coppola herself, in a way. The acting in the film is great, Stephen Dorff gives an excellent performance as does Elle Fanning. Dorff really threw himself in the role and fit well in it and he actually stayed at the Chateau Marmont, I later read that his role was actually written for him! And he also reminded me of Ben Affleck at parts. As previously stated, they work excellently with each other; there are other actors, that all do great jobs, especially Pontius as he was a lot of fun but this is their show. I even noticed Benicio del Toro in a very surprising and weird cameo, I was thinking, 'is that... Oh it is!', I could tell by his face who it was but it was still a weird little moment, I don't think I even paid attention to what was going on in that little scene, I was just so surprised! See if you can find him when you watch it! Sometimes though, just slightly, it did seem a bit forced just to show how disconnected he was. Really? He asked her why she wasn't at school and he didn't know it was a Sunday, or that he didn't know she had been doing ice skating for three years? Speaking of that scene, he kept looking at his phone and again, it felt forced.

The cinematography is gorgeous and has an interesting opening shot and the whole film has a trancelike quality, which is certainly a positive as it fits in with one of its themes and I found myself not being able to look away, regardless of whether I felt emotionally distant or not. It has a great soundtrack, a familiar sounding one to one of Coppola's previous films- that was the one I referenced at the start of this review. However, I do think that sometimes a shot was focused on too long and while for some of them it was the point, others it felt like it wasn't but funnily enough as soon as I thought about them being long; they stopped. The final shot of the film, while nice, felt like it was betraying everything that came before it and felt too clean for something like this, however, I felt like I could relate to that direct moment because of how I'm reviewing films again and I feel like I've watched the film at a really good time, but don't worry, I won't let that affect my score. I do love how subtle the film is though and it does portray its themes very well and it has some moments of absolute beauty, the scene by the pool is one of my favourites and it made me smile, the song playing in that scene is excellent too.

Overall, I liked it, it's confidently directed by Coppola and features a pair of excellent performances and it's a nice, little and different kind of story but I just wish it had more of the last half in the first and had more of an emotional impact but maybe that's my problem and it's on me? You know those films that people say aren't for everyone? Well, this is certainly one of them.
March 17, 2011
I thought the first half hour of this movie was so boring. Just endless shots that could be wrapped up in seconds. We get the point, he's a miserable and lonley man! But when the daughter came into the picture that is when things got good. But still I wanted more. I just think Sofia Coppola should think of new ideas rather than recycling the same story but in a different setting.
½ November 16, 2014
Love Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning. Chris Pontius' role was also entertaining. Good movie.
Super Reviewer
½ May 19, 2014
At its awfully slow-paced rate, 'Somewhere' (2010) is nothing but director Sofia Coppola relying more on her film's realism than its actual story. So what's the plot? Well... the film follows the subtle neglected day-to-day life of a Hollywood actor, Johnny Marco (played by the talented Stephen Dorff). While taking care of his eleven-year-old daughter (played Elle Fanning), Johnny gets the time to bond with her and personally reexamine his life until the film draws to a somewhat encouraging yet ambiguous end. I like the nice chemistry between Dorff and Fanning, and the great soundtrack, but as a whole nothing really happens in this movie. It's like Sofia wanted to make something with the same tones of previous film, 'Lost in Translation' (2003), and ultimately it got lost.... in translation. If you have the patience and are very familiar with Sofia Coppola's work, this very might be up your alley. (You probably already have seen this!) But if you want a more straight-forward story, go try somewhere else....
½ September 25, 2014
Another snoozer from Sofia Coppola. This is actually worse than The Bling Ring, and I was shocked by this because I hated that movie. At this point, I'm thinking Lost in Translation was a fluke. The Virgin Suicides was pretty good, but nothing special. Everything else has been totally shallow and boring as hell.
August 18, 2014
Continuing Coppola's string of films chronicling the listless ennui of affluent people and their numbness to life, "Somewhere" captures the suffocating daily monotony of press junkets, photo shoots, and stripper poles and its ultimate emptiness without real human interaction.
August 18, 2014
Very much a subpar cousin/sibling/sequel of unrelated characters - to lost in translation - if this eminently similar and superior movie were not at large then this one would have far more merit.. decent movie in that vein ..
½ December 23, 2010
A generally boring but gorgeous-looking movie with a crap ending.
Super Reviewer
August 10, 2014
Among the greatness that was "Lost in Translation," Sofia Coppola directs a very simple, yet elegant film that explores the life of a divorced actor who bnds with his daughter, taking her along on his trips. With many one-shot scenes, you can really immerse yourself in this world with the characters and when a movie can pull that off I love it. The big problem that this film has its that it is very simple and very slow, so I only recommend this film if you are willing to get into a film. Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning are a believable father/daughter duo and nothing about them felt forced, aside from the fact that he is a huge movie star in the film and there are moments where he is able to drive a car around without anyone noticing. This is just a few nitpicks though, because "Somewhere" is a great film. Sofia Coppola has come along way in directing feature films and there is something about every one of her films that intrigues me. "Somewhere" is not a perfect film, but it is something special in my eyes.
March 26, 2014
Sofia Coppola writes and directs this slow moving drama that feels about four hours long but doesn't even hit the two hour mark. I'm sorry but this film didn't really work for me. I just couldn't connect to the characters or situations, certainly not in the same way that I connected to "Lost in Translation". There are definitely touches of that film in here, where it is kind of slow, slightly comedic, and with a touch of a person getting confused by the happenings around him due to the language barrier. The film took far too long to get going, having to endure a guy driving in circles in a flat shot, sipping a beer for a couple minutes, and watching an entire stripper act TWICE before things actually get going. The film is really about this actor in an existential crisis who must learn to deal with his daughter after having her forced upon him when his ex-wife drops her off and leaves for a bit. I want to like Sofia Coppola, but I feel like her father she is coasting a bit on the success of her early work.
½ August 8, 2014
A fine existential take on life through the strange world of the actor. It's not unlike Coppola's 'Lost in Translation' with very similar themes and styles.
½ July 18, 2014
"Somewhere" is curiously flat, since Sofia Coppola explored the loneliness and isolation of celebrity to much greater effect in "Lost in Translation".
½ July 14, 2014
An oddly compelling character study that is steeped in nuance and mood, and much like its predecessor, 'Lost in Translation' (as well as films like Angel Rodriguez and Broken Flowers) reflects an uncompromised vision that is quiet and slow, but deliberate. I do wish it had a bit more meat on its bones though. The long-take scenes can, at times, be tedious.
½ June 25, 2014
A pleasant viewing experience even though detractors would argue that the film should 've been called Nowhere. Other than that, it defies Hollywood cliches and showcases genuinely tender interactions between the two leads.
May 31, 2014
GOES NOWHERE LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL
May 19, 2014
Fanning is great as always. Maybe one of the very slowest films I've ever seen. So interesting in its statements, though.
May 8, 2014
The movie's vibe is the antithesis to today's blockbuster action films and nearly every current movie. While I like the lack of camera angle switching, the scenes are deliberately drawn out to a painful effect. So maybe this movie is more art than function. I would prefer more character development and plot.
hunterjt13
Super Reviewer
½ May 2, 2014
While receiving mysterious and threatening text messages, an actor takes care of his daughter.
Slow and unencumbered by sticky inconveniences like plot and character development, Somewhere goes nowhere. The film drifts from one episodic bit of nonsense to the next. All the while, father and daughter enjoy conveniences that no normal person could aspire to, and some mysterious plotline about threatening text messages wanders in on its way to another film.
I never think about Stephen Dorff, but I'm always glad when I see him in a film. For a while, I was compelled by his performance, but when I realized that the film forgot to figure out what its plot is, I stopped caring.
Overall, I'm starting to think that Sofia Coppola's one trick was Lost in Translation, but then there's The Virgin Suicides too, so I guess she's a two-trick pony.
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