Scenes to Skip

Movies that would have been better off leaving a bit more on the cutting room floor.

Let's get one thing straight, right off the bat: making a movie can be insanely difficult work. Making a good one is even harder, and sometimes, even the films we love contain a scene or two we wish had never made it into the final cut. With that in mind, we on the RT editorial staff decided to put together a little list of scenes that, if only removed, would have made some bad movies good and some good movies great. Be forewarned: spoilers will abound here, so proceed with caution if you haven't seen some of these films.


73%

A.I. Artificial Intelligence

Stanley Kubrick tinkered with A.I., an adaptation of the Brian Aldiss short story "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," throughout the final decades of his life. Kubrick wanted the central character David, a robotic boy with the ability to love, to be an actual functioning robot; he abandoned the project each time it became clear robotics and special effects were not advanced enough to suit his vision. After his death, Kubrick's friend Steven Spielberg took command of A.I., casting Haley Joel Osment as the lonely David, who embarks on a hopeless and nightmarish journey to become a real boy. The result is a discomforting mix of two very different directors' sensibilities, especially in the final sequence, when David becomes trapped at the bottom of the ocean and the film fast-forwards 2,000 years to a new ice age when humans have become extinct, and robots have evolved into highly intelligent creatures. They grant David his impossible wish of spending one more day with his human mother, and then the film concludes. Audiences are left scratching their heads at this overtly sentimental finale; had it been cut, A.I. would've been a more straightforward, taut, and tragic tale. And for the record, Spielberg has stated this ending was exactly how Kubrick had scripted it.


95%

Being There

Being There, Hal Ashby's classic 1979 comedy, is a masterwork in how to control the tone of a movie. It stars Peter Sellers as a simpleton who knows existence only through his banal television shows. A chance run-in with high society (literally, his character adopts the name Chauncey Gardiner) escalates in a comedy of errors that witnesses millionaires, businessmen, and even the president misinterpreting everything Chauncey does and says. The situations and positions of power Chauncey stumbles into grow more and more outlandish, but the movie itself stays grounded due to Sellers' performance. Chauncey plays the blissful fool: we're invited to laugh at him, but Sellers also gives Chauncey a perfect note of melancholy. There's something sweet and sad about Chauncey, the center of a vortex of educated people who, in the drive for money and status, have lost touch with the simple joys of life. Being There's closing shot is literally lighter than air, so it's a real travesty the most common cut of the film shows outtakes immediately during the end credits. The fourth wall is destroyed completely, and what was, just seconds ago, a magical journey is demystified by a clinical behind-the-scenes gag reel. Stop the film immediately when it ends and you'll carry its magic with you for days.


72%

Elephant

Given the sheer awfulness of the Columbine massacre, Gus Van Sant's Elephant was bound to be controversial. However, Van Sant's film was admirably free of exploitation or elucidation -- he didn't depict the high school mass murderers with anything but cold detachment, and he made no effort to explain what drove the killers to act as they did. In fact, this matter-of-factness makes Elephant all the more chilling; in documenting a day in the life of a suburban high school from several different perspectives, Van Sant conjures a deeply ominous mood. However, there's one scene that sticks out like a sore thumb: the moment when the two killers start kissing in the shower. It's seriously unlikely that the openly gay Van Sant is implying that his characters' homosexuality is the reason for their murderous rage; in fact, it's hard to know exactly what he was going for here, since the scene marks a jarring tonal shift away from the dispassionate, show-rather-than-tell vibe of the rest of the movie.


78%

Flight

Flight treats us to a gripping performance by Denzel Washington as a man struggling to overcome his alcoholism. So when he finally comes clean about his drinking in a very public way, we should see him get arrested, and then see the credits roll. That's it -- his redemption is that he finally admitted he had a problem. It's the perfect note to end the movie. But instead we get another ending: a prison AA meeting. OK, fine. Then we get another ending: Denzel writing letters in his cell. That's enough now. Wait, there's another ending after that? Now he's talking to his son. Do we really need to be force-fed every step of his recovery? No, we really don't.


63%

Funny Games

Both versions of Funny Games (the 1997 original German language and the 2007 American version) were directed by Michael Haneke (Amour), so they're virtually identical, language aside... and so is the infamous "rewind scene." Breaking the fourth wall to address the audience can be tricky enough, but including a sequence in which a character employs a remote control to literally "rewind" -- and thereby erase -- an earlier event in the film? Well now, that's just preposterous. When two young psycho kids (Amo Frischare and Frank Giering; Michael Pitt and Brady Corbet in the remake) hold a family captive in its vacation home, the mother, Anna (Susanne Lothar/Naomi Watts), eventually strikes back, grabbing a shotgun (conveniently placed beside her) and blowing away one of the attackers. In the audience, we scream, "YOU GO!" but alas, we were just being toyed with. Haneke treats us like puppets by manipulating us, waving something big in front of us and then taking it away. It's a case of, "You wish this is what happened. Psych!" Some fans argue that this tactic is brilliant, that if something makes us angry, the result is a success. But in this case, the audience's time has been wasted. Removing the rewind and fourth-wall elements would make either version of Funny Games far more watchable.


65%

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

When Peter Jackson announced that his Middle-earth follow up, The Hobbit, would be stretched into a trilogy akin to the Lord of the Rings saga, many wondered how he would manage such a feat with significantly less source material. The answer, of course, was that Jackson's adaptation would include plot elements from J.R.R. Tolkien's supplemental notes and texts, as well as new scenes to give more screen time to familiar faces... and that's where he may have overstepped his bounds. In an entirely fabricated sequence, Gandalf the Grey (Ian McKellen) meets with the White Council in Rivendell, mostly to discuss the impending threat of an ominous necromancer (gee, who could that be?) who never actually shows up in An Unexpected Journey. The scene serves purely to foreshadow what will come in following installments and to provide a more concrete connection to the LOTR series by reintroducing characters like Galadriel (Cate Blanchett) and Saruman (Christopher Lee), neither of whom actually appear in Tolkien's Hobbit. That's all well and good, except that the largely action-driven film comes to a screeching halt here, hampered by compulsory exposition and needless cameos. Leaving that bit on the cutting room floor would have ensured a much brisker pace.


96%

Psycho

They don't call Alfred Hitchcock "The Master of Suspense" for nothing, and Psycho is one of the great director's most potent fright fests. It laid the groundwork for modern horror, and subverted audience expectations in audacious ways; not only did Hitch kill off his heroine at the halfway point, he also made stab-happy Norman Bates into a sympathetic character. In fact, Psycho was so far ahead of the curve, Hitchcock felt the need to explain to the gobsmacked masses why the owner of the Bates Motel wore a dress and had antagonistic conversations with his "mother." Thus, he included a coda in which a psychiatrist (Simon Oakland) explains Norman's twisted mental state. Then he explains some more. Then he continues to explain, just to be sure we didn't miss anything. Hitchcock closes the film with a haunting final shot -- he superimposes "Mother's" skull over Norman's face -- thereby saving the ending from going completely off the rails; as Roger Ebert wrote, "I have never encountered a single convincing defense of the psychiatric blather."

Mode: HLS Link


100%

Singin' in the Rain

Singin' in the Rain is packed to the gills with entertainment, from its clever meta plot to the legendary dance sequences with Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, and Debbie Reynolds. The scene to skip is a fantasy sequence Kelly dreams up towards the finale, a literally showstopping number that grinds the movie's zippy pace to a halt. It's understandable why this was included -- the only way to see a movie in 1952 was to haul your dapper keister to a theater, and Hollywood wanted to cram in as much film and celebrity to make it worth your money. The choreography is more complex during the dream sequence, involving dozens of people instead of just the three stars, and the costumes more vibrant and varied. Cyd Charisse also shows up as Kelly's dancing partner, which effectively diffuses the budding romantic plot between Kelly and Reynolds. Skip this entire sequence and shorten the movie down to a perfect, crisp 90 minutes.


63%

Spider-Man 3

When contemplating scenes that should be skipped, you can't forget about the ridiculous jazz club bit in Spider-Man 3. You know the one, where Peter (Tobey Maguire) takes Gwen Stacy (Bryce Dallas Howard) to the jazz club where MJ (Kirsten Dunst) works, only to show off and deliver a god-awful dance performance that is so out of place it simply leaves you feeling dumbfounded. Yeah, that's the one. In a film that gave us a trifecta of villains and another iconic love interest of Peter's, it was downright disappointing to throw in such a useless scene. At this point, we had already seen Pete trash Eddie's camera and supposedly kill Flint Marko, and we saw the symbiotic organism latch onto Peter, creating a costume-like skin. With so much to cover in this film, it's almost insulting to the audience to waste time on indulgences like this. It would have been preferable for this scene -- and Peter Parker's emo eyeliner -- to take a hike.


57%

Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace

As obnoxious as Jar-Jar Binks is, as boring as the political speeches are, there's one scene that needs to be cut more than anything else: the scene when Qui-Gon Jinn tests Anakin's midichlorian count. Up until that point, you could assume that anyone could use the force; it was just a matter of belief and willpower. That lent a hopeful and almost religious air to the Star Wars universe. But then George Lucas had to go and use a scientific explanation for the Force, which took a lot of the magic out of Star Wars. Not only that, but now Yoda's "luminous beings" speech in Empire Strikes Back doesn't really make sense anymore.


Written by Matt Atchity, Alex Vo, Tim Ryan, Ryan Fujitani, Catherine Pricci, and Kerr Lordygan

Comments

Jefferey Nelson

Jefferey Nelson

The one change in movie history I would make is that Goose should have never died in Top Gun. Fix that before all these others.

Apr 29 - 01:18 AM

CFM

'schak Attack

Did it make you cry?

Apr 29 - 09:14 AM

David Jenny

David Jenny

who didnt it make cry

Apr 30 - 05:39 PM

dethburger

dethburger hates Flixster

Goose deserved to die.

Apr 30 - 06:41 PM

Brendan Cox

Brendan Cox

Maverick was dangerous. Goose just couldn't hang. Just ask Iceman.

Apr 30 - 07:03 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

It was a god damn good death.

Apr 30 - 07:34 PM

Bob DiNardo

Bob DiNardo

Yes, that Goose was a bastard.

May 3 - 05:57 PM

Brett Nottingham

Brett Nottingham

Spoiler alert!

May 1 - 08:22 AM

Jess Kohs

Jess Kohs

come on, you've had 25 years to see it, you really think you're going to now?

May 3 - 05:14 AM

Esmeralda C.

Esmeralda Cervantes

hahahaha, same here never watched that movie and honestly, don't think I will ever watch it.

May 3 - 12:15 PM

Justin Hensley

Justin Hensley

You're definitely missing out

May 5 - 05:12 PM

Daniel Draghici

Daniel Draghici

Yes or the scene where Porkins dies in Star Wars. Porkins, nooo!

May 2 - 10:10 PM

Tommy Woerner

Tommy Woerner

Best comment yet

May 4 - 10:13 AM

Maynard Maleon

Maynard Maleon

I only agree with the GODAWFUL Spider-man 3 scene. The symbiote was supposed to make him a meaner version of the original Spidey. Here, it just made him into a world-class jerk.And incredibly awful directing!

Apr 29 - 02:03 AM

gammellm

Mike Gammell

Agreed, but in fairness, the whole movie was mess

May 1 - 11:57 AM

Maurice Brown

Maurice Brown

I couldn't agree more. The part that drove me nuts (other than that damn cooking scene and the soundtrack and the plot) was Venom always saying "I". It should be "We".

May 1 - 11:58 PM

Brian Harris

Brian Harris

Sam Raimi get's really upset whenever anyone brings that movie up, especially the dancing scene.

May 6 - 01:13 AM

Chris Weir

Chris Weir

That scene was laugh out loud funny and does not deserve to be cut. I'd like to see more superhero movies like this but I guess everyone expects the Nolan treatment.

Jun 2 - 03:32 PM

King  S.

King Simba

Interesting. Several of these films immediately came to my mind as soon as I read the title of the article.

A.I should have really ended with David plunging into the water. Those last 20 minutes were just plane weird with a very unsatisfying ending (okay, David finally got his wish, what exactly happened after those 24 hours were up?)

Agreed completely on Singing in the Rain. The Broadway Melody really hurts what is otherwise a classic. It just goes on and on, yet has nothing to do with the plot. It felt like they put it simply because they wanted to show off all the colors they could do (this was in the early days of colored film after all). It's what prevents the film from topping my list of favorite live action musicals (I'd put Sound of Music, Mary Poppins, My Fair Lady and West Side Story above it, all of which despite their much longer runtime don't have a sequence that drags as long as Broadway Melody).

I think Phantom Menace as a whole needed a lot of trimming down. When it work it worked (The Pod Race was fantastic and so was the climax) but the film really stalled after they crashed landed on Tatooine and then again when they arrived on Coruscant. Attack of the Clones also could have been greatly improved with some trimming down.

I'm surprised though no comedy made this list, given how so many comedies will have a scene where an already weak joke gets dragged on way too long (e.g the stool scene in Austin Powers 2).

Apr 29 - 05:50 AM

Jackson Eckert

Jackson Eckert

If you don't think Being There is a comedy, you don't have a sense of humor worth representing in this list.

May 1 - 06:56 AM

King  S.

King Simba

Damn, I don't know how I missed that film being on the list!

May 2 - 12:15 AM

King  S.

King Simba

I'd also add the last ten minutes of True Grit to the list. It's another case of a film not knowing when to end. Spoilers: Did we really need to see Mattie become a grumpy one armed lady? What was the point of that other than to serve as an anti-climax for the viewers? I also could have done without a certain Owl Ship scene in Watchmen.

Apr 29 - 06:05 AM

Joseph Listopad

Joseph Listopad

That was the point. It was SUPPOSED to be an anti-climax. It shows just how little her revenge actually brought her. She spent so much time, went through so much trying to kill the man who killed her father, and it didn't really bring her much joy. It's meant to be a far more realistic and downbeat conclusion, showing us that revenge doesn't really fix as much as we think it will.

Apr 29 - 07:14 AM

CFM

'schak Attack

I fully agree with Joseph. That was the whole point of the ending.

Apr 29 - 09:16 AM

CFM

'schak Attack

Methinks that No Country for Old Men also had this type of 'anti-climatic' but 'pro-thought-provoking' end, too.

Apr 29 - 09:19 AM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

Yeah but the problem is that thought was 'Why did I just watch this fucking movie?'.

May 2 - 03:42 PM

Nicole Lowman

Nicole Lowman

There Will Be Blood too...

May 2 - 05:26 PM

Adam Hirschhorn

Adam Hirschhorn

No. That was the payoff. You can't call a film There Will Be Blood and then have no blood. That would be wrong.

May 29 - 10:45 AM

Brad and Netflix

Bradly Martin

I'd also like to agree with Joseph but also agree with King Simba in the sense that I loved Grumpy Old Mattie ending while my wife was devastated she grew up to be a grumpy old Lady.

Apr 30 - 06:52 PM

Zachary Allen

Zachary Allen

I agree with King Simba completely. I understand what they were trying to do with the last ten minutes, however, it kinda spoiled the movie. I personally think it should've ended right when he shot up in the air for the doctor. That would've been perfect. I loved, and I mean LOVED, the entire movie. But, as King Simba said, the last ten minutes were VERY weak.

May 1 - 07:47 AM

Adam Cox

Adam Cox

The Owl Ship scene is Dan's big character moment. As much as he hides the fact that he misses the past, he gets a real chubby when the suit goes on. The first scene that they try to have sex, he fails. He has the dream of the world ending due to nuclear war, and they peel off the facades they've been hiding behind(their civilian skin) and reveal the costumes. They then suit up later on, and it allows him to get it up. He suddenly doesn't feel so weak anymore.

Apr 29 - 08:32 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Doesn't excuse the stupid use of the classic Leonard Cohen song.

Apr 30 - 04:20 PM

Dash Hulman

Dash Hulman

The Leonard Cohen song actually made me love that scene so much more.

May 2 - 10:43 AM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Why? What purpose did it serve? If you look at the book, and see the music referenced there (including a lot of stuff that Snyder did not take advantage of - like songs by John Cale, Elvis Costello, Iggy Pop. The song playing during the tenement fire scene was Billie Holliday's "You're My Thrill". That song reflects their arousal more adequetely than a song with references to biblically unfaithful women. It's a great song, of course. So is "Hey Jude", and it wouldn't have made sense in that scene either. There must be a reason why you appreciate it other than being a cool song in a cool scene.

But Snyder is an idiot, and has lousy taste in music, shown most clearly in "Sucker Punch". The selections of "Sweet Dreams", "Love is a Drug", "Tomorrow Never Knows" make narrative sense, at least, but he insists on using awful emo covers. Similarly, Dylan's "Desolation Row", the song quoted as the beginning of the book Watchmen, with numerous symbols directly associated with the book's themes, is relegated by Snyder to the closing credits, and he uses (again) a horrid, indecipherable emo version. All of his musical choices are superficial and obvious. "Things Are A-Changing" was used in the book as a perfume ad, to show how commercialism sucks meaning out of art. "Sounds of Silence" did nothing but make me wish Will Ferrall was Dr. Manhatten, singing "Dust in the Wind" at the Comedian's funeral.

May 2 - 01:34 PM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

Must agree the music in Sucker Punch was shit. Along with the story, the plot, the acting, the directing. So bad it rendered the cool effects irrelevant.

May 2 - 03:45 PM

Brian Chiasson

Brian Chiasson

Nudity involved therefore mustn't be cut. Or what Adam said, that was probably written better.

Apr 30 - 11:17 PM

Cameron Britton

Cameron Britton

I get what Joseph and others are saying here, but I sorta felt that booking ending True Grit with the her-as-an-old-lady stuff ruined the suspense of the ending. We knew she would survive the snake bite because she started the movie with a voice over as an older person.

Apr 30 - 04:36 PM

zooman

Alex Reyes

I still really think it is not about finding out she was alive though. It helps the movie as a whole, without it, it wouldnt be more than a popcorn summer flick. Through the beginning you start imagining what this amazing little girl should become when older, throughout the movie you sympathize with her, worry a bit about her firm decision with revenge, and see her inner dilemma between fairness, justice, mercy, grace and revenge. Ending it before that final scene would have ended the movie in a hollywood high, reaching nowhere but cheap thrills and excitement. The ending brings together the whole in a nicer way. Still it could have been done better as to not create this feeling and making it feel as a real part of the whole more successfully. Maybe adding more of that sense the ending gives throughout the movie, having shots of it? Kind of like the shots of the CIA office through Burn after Reading bring together the whole so nicely... Still, I think omitting that scene would be terrible, not at all better for the movie.

Apr 30 - 05:58 PM

Wendy Taylor

Wendy Taylor

Just because the protagonist does the voice over is no guarantee they survive the movie. See: "Sunset Boulevard."

I haven't seen a lot of movies on this list, so can't comment on them, but I can say that I remember watching "A.I." and thinking, isn't it over yet? If Kubrick wrote that ending, fine, but I felt it dragged. For "Singin' in the Rain," I kind of agree -- I think the Broadway Melody does slow it down, but it *is* part of the plot. Gene Kelly's character, Don, is explaining his vision of a movie to the studio boss, and we get to see it.

May 2 - 05:47 AM

Joseph Listopad

Joseph Listopad

That was the point. It was SUPPOSED to be an anti-climax. It shows just how little her revenge actually brought her. She spent so much time, went through so much trying to kill the man who killed her father, and it didn't really bring her much joy. It's meant to be a far more realistic and downbeat conclusion, showing us that revenge doesn't really fix as much as we think it will.

Apr 29 - 07:14 AM

CFM

'schak Attack

I fully agree with Joseph. That was the whole point of the ending.

Apr 29 - 09:16 AM

CFM

'schak Attack

Methinks that No Country for Old Men also had this type of 'anti-climatic' but 'pro-thought-provoking' end, too.

Apr 29 - 09:19 AM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

Yeah but the problem is that thought was 'Why did I just watch this fucking movie?'.

May 2 - 03:42 PM

Nicole Lowman

Nicole Lowman

There Will Be Blood too...

May 2 - 05:26 PM

Adam Hirschhorn

Adam Hirschhorn

No. That was the payoff. You can't call a film There Will Be Blood and then have no blood. That would be wrong.

May 29 - 10:45 AM

Brad and Netflix

Bradly Martin

I'd also like to agree with Joseph but also agree with King Simba in the sense that I loved Grumpy Old Mattie ending while my wife was devastated she grew up to be a grumpy old Lady.

Apr 30 - 06:52 PM

Zachary Allen

Zachary Allen

I agree with King Simba completely. I understand what they were trying to do with the last ten minutes, however, it kinda spoiled the movie. I personally think it should've ended right when he shot up in the air for the doctor. That would've been perfect. I loved, and I mean LOVED, the entire movie. But, as King Simba said, the last ten minutes were VERY weak.

May 1 - 07:47 AM

CFM

'schak Attack

I think A.I. is perfect. I wouldn't change a thing. Heartbreaking, even in its resolution.

I don't remember thinking the ending of Flight as being extraneous.

With the Hobbit, I will take every minute of Middle Earth that Peter Jackson has to offer. The 'movie' Hobbit can allude to a bigger picture that the 'novel' Hobbit didn't have privy to. It's all fine by me, man.

Star Wars: Episode I has alot more things to nitpick about besides the midichlorian explanation. Still... even though I'd agree with the many things everybody says is wrong with the prequels, I still think there's lots to love with each movie. It's Star Wars, dammit!

Apr 29 - 09:00 AM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

A.I. is perfect.

Apr 30 - 04:21 PM

Danny Fox-Baker

Danny Fox-Baker

If George Lucas ate a three week old Taco Loco, vomited it the next day, called a press conference and announced that his vomit was officially Star Wars.... would you start clapping ?

I saw episodes I to III, hoping the next would be better than the last. I saw them only once. Luckily my memory is shitty and has selectively left behind the experience so I can better identify Star Wars as being the Star Wars that existed before that vomitous embarrassment that happened 10 years ago.

Apr 30 - 05:32 PM

Brad and Netflix

Bradly Martin

A.I. is what defines me as cynical heartless jerk (to my friends). I never felt in my heart of hearts that David was anything more than the product of his programing, however I agree the films ending with that blue fairy nonsense (in a cynical sense) can't be left on the cutting room floor. It showed the impact a Mother has on a child even if it is just a robot participating in the product of its own program. The Heartless flawed Idiotic Dramatic Mother of his actual life was nothing like the perfect representation of the mother the aliens restored. This shows that a mother is perfect in the eyes of her child and in as much made David into a real boy via Velveteen rabbit and not so much Pinocchio.
I would love to read why you ('Schak Attack, Janson) Think its a Perfect Film.
I wish Flight would have ended after Denzel's big scene personally.

I felt like I was waiting for absolutely nothing to happen while watching the Hobbit...I miss my childhood sense of Adventure.

I say Edit out every time Anikan says Yipee and the tomato-meter would go up by 10%

Apr 30 - 07:02 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Because I'm not a cynical heartless jerk.

The film blends the themes of Pinocchio and Ghost in the Shell about what it means to be alive and aware and "real". There are important allusions to abandonment and the God Complex, and like Spielberg's other great fantasies of the last 20 years (Jurassic Park, Minority Report), it deals with the unintended consequences of technology we aren't ready to be responsible for. A.I. deals with that last point more intimately.

Apr 30 - 07:43 PM

Owen Liversidge

Owen Liversidge

I liked the ending of A.I., also. If we're talking about Spielberg, I thought that the ending of Minority Report was out of place. That movie had been fairly dark in tone, especially with the Film Noir look, and I thought that a darker ending or a cliffhanger would have suited it better!

May 1 - 04:53 AM

Craig Hawkins

Craig Hawkins

If Minority Report had ended when Tom Cruise's character was placed in that (cryogenic?) prison tube, that would have been perfect!

May 1 - 03:54 PM

King  S.

King Simba

I actually really like the ending of Minority Report because depending how you look at it it's either really sweet or really depressing. Like Inception and Total Recall there's a question of how much of it was real.

(Spoilers) Think about it, right before John is put into prison his friend informers him that he'll have visions, that his life will flash before his eyes, that all his dreams will come true. It is right after that scene that everything starts working out for John. His wife comes and breaks him out of prison, he reveals the truth to the public, Lamar gets killed, the precogs are freed and he gets back with his wife and they have another child. It could have all simply been the visions his friend was talking about. In my opinion, the fact that Spielberg refused to comment on the ending tells me that he wants to leave it up to the viewer to decide whether or not it was real.

May 2 - 12:12 AM

Patrick Wiley

Patrick Wiley

I've seen that movie like three or four times and I never thought of that alternate interpretation.

May 3 - 12:10 PM

Cody K.

Cody Kerr

I never got what was so bad about midichlorians.

For one, the Republic is a class 1 to 2 civilization (Earth is Class 0) with the technological capabilities of interstellar travel. NOT having a scientific theory of explanation for something so obviously real would be a huge plothole (and was in the original trilogy).

Secondly, one of the main aspects that makes Star Wars so enjoyable is the blurring of science and fantasy. Midichlorians just blur that line all the more. Midichlorians answered one question and created hundreds more, adding to the mystery that is the Force.

Finally, midichlorians don't determine who can use the Force like this articles author suggested, every organism has them, they indicate the force potential. It's like Intelligence Quotient, just because Newton's was higher than Einstien's, that doesn't mean he could have done the same things.

I say keep it in.

May 1 - 07:04 AM

Nick Porter

Nick Porter

Good post.
One other point I'd make is that the Republic has a vast population - hundreds of billions? Trillions? Tens of trillions? If "anyone" could be a Jedi provided they had the strength of will, there would have been enough of them to populate a sizeable country, not a handful of temples.

May 1 - 10:23 AM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

But very few people have such strength of will, much less the discipline and patience to undergo the training. Most people in general tend to chose easy, convenient options rather than applying strenuous effort, if they can avoid it. People can be a lot of great things if they wanted to do the hard work it takes. Most people opt for comfortable mediocrity. Sad, but true.

And Cody, that's not what "plothole" means. Whether or not The Force is given a mystical or scientific definition, it has no effect on the narrative events of the story (you know, the "plot"). Midichlorians are worse than a plothole, it's a lazy plotplug, little more than a weak deus ex machina.

May 1 - 11:49 AM

Jacob Scalf

Jacob Scalf

To add to that the Jedi Order became "too scientific" in their explanation of the Force which I believe is another reason why Yoda went into exile by himself. He needed to meditate on the Force. Qui-gon was on this path of being mindful of the living Force and I think the reason he checked was just because it was practice of theirs. They went away from the essence of the Force and the basics and made it much more scientific and complex than it should've been. Yoda's "luminous beings" dialog was the realization he came to after being in exile and meditation for 18 years. So what this author says about Phantom Menace is pretty much bunk. I think George was just showing us how different the Jedi were when the Republic reigned.

May 2 - 01:06 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Yoda knew the midichlorians were the Jedis downfall.

May 2 - 02:44 PM

Paul Soldner

Paul Soldner

Damn right you are Cody!

May 4 - 07:13 PM

CFM

'schak Attack

Regarding Psycho's ending - to this point we've all seen scores of movies that have done 'crazy' many times over. But I wonder if back in the 1960 cinescape, if maybe the 'crazy' thing hadn't been seen to the same extent by audiences, thereby requiring (back in 1960) a little more of the explanation that the final scene gives? Just thinking that maybe the year of the picture is relevent to the way the story is told in context to the time of its release?

Apr 29 - 09:12 AM

infernaldude

Infernal Dude

Thats kind of what I was thinking when I read the Psycho bit. Older films had a lot more exposition than modern films. I always chuckle when I watch old sci-fi movies and listen to the "scientist" or "doctor" explain shit.

Apr 30 - 04:01 PM

Dave J

Dave J

I agree, back then "explaining" it was how it used to be back then! It's also Hitchcock's most successful film of all time too! At the end of "The Jagged Edge" there were some viewers who couldn't make out the killer's face lying on the floor!

Apr 30 - 04:38 PM

Dean Wirth

Dean Wirth

I liked the ending myself ...creepy cool...

Apr 30 - 05:51 PM

CFM

'schak Attack

Did it make you cry?

Apr 29 - 09:14 AM

David Jenny

David Jenny

who didnt it make cry

Apr 30 - 05:39 PM

CFM

'schak Attack

I fully agree with Joseph. That was the whole point of the ending.

Apr 29 - 09:16 AM

CFM

'schak Attack

Methinks that No Country for Old Men also had this type of 'anti-climatic' but 'pro-thought-provoking' end, too.

Apr 29 - 09:19 AM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

Yeah but the problem is that thought was 'Why did I just watch this fucking movie?'.

May 2 - 03:42 PM

Nicole Lowman

Nicole Lowman

There Will Be Blood too...

May 2 - 05:26 PM

Adam Hirschhorn

Adam Hirschhorn

No. That was the payoff. You can't call a film There Will Be Blood and then have no blood. That would be wrong.

May 29 - 10:45 AM

Adam Cox

Adam Cox

The Owl Ship scene is Dan's big character moment. As much as he hides the fact that he misses the past, he gets a real chubby when the suit goes on. The first scene that they try to have sex, he fails. He has the dream of the world ending due to nuclear war, and they peel off the facades they've been hiding behind(their civilian skin) and reveal the costumes. They then suit up later on, and it allows him to get it up. He suddenly doesn't feel so weak anymore.

Apr 29 - 08:32 PM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Doesn't excuse the stupid use of the classic Leonard Cohen song.

Apr 30 - 04:20 PM

Dash Hulman

Dash Hulman

The Leonard Cohen song actually made me love that scene so much more.

May 2 - 10:43 AM

Janson Jinnistan

Janson Jinnistan

Why? What purpose did it serve? If you look at the book, and see the music referenced there (including a lot of stuff that Snyder did not take advantage of - like songs by John Cale, Elvis Costello, Iggy Pop. The song playing during the tenement fire scene was Billie Holliday's "You're My Thrill". That song reflects their arousal more adequetely than a song with references to biblically unfaithful women. It's a great song, of course. So is "Hey Jude", and it wouldn't have made sense in that scene either. There must be a reason why you appreciate it other than being a cool song in a cool scene.

But Snyder is an idiot, and has lousy taste in music, shown most clearly in "Sucker Punch". The selections of "Sweet Dreams", "Love is a Drug", "Tomorrow Never Knows" make narrative sense, at least, but he insists on using awful emo covers. Similarly, Dylan's "Desolation Row", the song quoted as the beginning of the book Watchmen, with numerous symbols directly associated with the book's themes, is relegated by Snyder to the closing credits, and he uses (again) a horrid, indecipherable emo version. All of his musical choices are superficial and obvious. "Things Are A-Changing" was used in the book as a perfume ad, to show how commercialism sucks meaning out of art. "Sounds of Silence" did nothing but make me wish Will Ferrall was Dr. Manhatten, singing "Dust in the Wind" at the Comedian's funeral.

May 2 - 01:34 PM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

Must agree the music in Sucker Punch was shit. Along with the story, the plot, the acting, the directing. So bad it rendered the cool effects irrelevant.

May 2 - 03:45 PM

Brian Chiasson

Brian Chiasson

Nudity involved therefore mustn't be cut. Or what Adam said, that was probably written better.

Apr 30 - 11:17 PM

Ethan Singer

Ethan Singer

i felt like in the hobbit, thats' when the movie found its heart,an actual emotional center, and took off. it became a full middle earth adventure, and the stakes were raised. to remove that scene, and the movie loses its soul.

Apr 30 - 03:33 PM

CFM

'schak Attack

Well said Ethan! Why not acknowledge the bigger story that the movie version has privy to?

May 1 - 10:38 AM

brunomen

Bruno Mendes

Well said. And the actors performances alone in that scene made it worth watching. The 3 trolls sequence, for example, was much more useless and deserving of removal/shortening that that one.

May 2 - 09:41 AM

Valmordas

Val Mordas

The troll scene could have been better, but fans would have shit a brick if it was removed.

May 2 - 03:49 PM

brunomen

Bruno Mendes

It could have been much better and shorter... it seemed to take forever when I watched it. But there are other scenes like that, that's only the one I remmeber better, but it's just one example.

May 2 - 06:11 PM

Patrick Wiley

Patrick Wiley

Not giving them annoying high pitched voices would have been a start...

May 3 - 12:14 PM

Typhon

Typhon Q

Spiderman 3 dance scene. Just ewww....

Apr 30 - 03:53 PM

Dean Wirth

Dean Wirth

It was gross and stupid

Apr 30 - 05:52 PM

Mitchell Nash

Mitchell Nash

Every dance Parker did sucked. The stupid cookie scene sucked, too. The emo hair sucked. The emo dark eyes sucked. Just, the whole way the symbiote affected him sucked except how brutal he became when fighting bad guys.

Apr 30 - 09:33 PM

infernaldude

Infernal Dude

Thats kind of what I was thinking when I read the Psycho bit. Older films had a lot more exposition than modern films. I always chuckle when I watch old sci-fi movies and listen to the "scientist" or "doctor" explain shit.

Apr 30 - 04:01 PM

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