Tape Reviews

Top Critic
Dennis Harvey
Variety
May 20, 2008
Three actors yakking in a single drab interior, shot on HD video: It's unlikely this poverty-program recipe has, or ever will again, yield results quite as entertaining as "Tape."
Top Critic
Geoff Andrew
Time Out
June 24, 2006
This makes good on that old Dogme promise by discarding the crutches of conventional movie drama and concentrating on the raw essentials of character and story.
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Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
March 22, 2002
If Tape's claustrophobia doesn't get to you, and if you've got the intestinal fortitude to spend nearly 90 minutes in intimate proximity with two equally unlikeable guys, the movie does exert a certain propulsive fascination.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Liam Lacey
Globe and Mail
March 22, 2002
For the most part, Tape is smart and deftly executed, with Hawke, in particular, as the resentful Vince, making a vivid impression.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Peter Rainer
New York Magazine/Vulture
January 22, 2002
The performances are amazingly charged and fluid.
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Jay Boyar
Orlando Sentinel
January 17, 2002
There's a place in the world of the cinema for filmed theater, especially when it's done as well as it is here.
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Michael O'Sullivan
Washington Post
December 14, 2001
Implodes under the weight of its own 'excessive linguistic pressure.'
| Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Steven Rosen
Denver Post
December 7, 2001
A failed experiment with arresting moments.
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Rita Kempley
Washington Post
December 5, 2001
Picture a typical student film with its arty angles, bad lighting and pretentious observations.
| Original Score: 1/5
Top Critic
Richard Roeper
Ebert & Roeper
November 27, 2001
Tape plays in real time in a cramped space, but there are a lot of surprises lurking in the corners of that room.
Top Critic
Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
November 16, 2001
Steeped in venom, deception, and manipulation, Tape is a three-way volley of mind games in which an adolescent grudge assumes the complexion of a festering wound.
| Original Score: 3.5/4
Top Critic
Moira MacDonald
Seattle Times
November 16, 2001
Basically a character study, and quite an engaging one at that.
Top Critic
Mick LaSalle
San Francisco Chronicle
November 16, 2001
Like most movies by Linklater, it's the kind of film that doesn't usually get made -- a dramatic chamber piece for young people.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Eric Harrison
Houston Chronicle
November 16, 2001
Perhaps because they are working out emotional conflicts from high school, and Vince seems stuck at a childish emotional level, what takes place in the room seems juvenile, despite the powerful subject matter.
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Chris Vognar
Dallas Morning News
November 16, 2001
It's for anyone who appreciates the bitter erosion of friendship and the one-upmanship and mind games bred by festering antagonism.
Top Critic
Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
November 16, 2001
Tape made me believe that its events could happen to real people more or less as they appear on the screen, and that is its most difficult accomplishment.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Top Critic
Jay Carr
Boston Globe
November 16, 2001
Tape is smart, unpredictable, and alive with the energies of actors who clearly are enjoying being stretched by their material.
| Original Score: 3.5/4
Top Critic
Owen Gleiberman
Entertainment Weekly
November 6, 2001
Hawke releases his inner actor, and it's a kick to see.
Full Review | Original Score: A-
Top Critic
Mike Clark
USA Today
November 2, 2001
Linklater's movie of a Stephen Belber play is for half its length a dull, two-character drama crying out for fresh blood.
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Lou Lumenick
New York Post
November 2, 2001
You never quite escape the feeling you're watching a barely adapted TV version of a somewhat gimmicky stage play.
| Original Score: 2.5/4
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Paul Tatara
CNN.com
November 2, 2001
The banter isn't sharp enough to drive the story, and Linklater's lack of visual elegance is a major hindrance.
Top Critic
Stephen Holden
New York Times
November 2, 2001
Ethan Hawke, Robert Sean Leonard and Uma Thurman give the most psychologically acute performances of their film careers.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
Top Critic
Kevin Thomas
Los Angeles Times
November 2, 2001
Makes its points -- and how -- but never for a second forgets to be thoroughly engrossing.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
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Jonathan Rosenbaum
Chicago Reader
November 2, 2001
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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James Berardinelli
ReelViews
November 1, 2001
An amazingly dynamic motion picture -- one that challenges viewers' ideas and preconceptions.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Dennis Lim
Village Voice
October 30, 2001
Takes shape as an entertaining psychological armwrestle between rank belligerence and blustery condescension.
Top Critic
Peter Travers
Rolling Stone
October 29, 2001
The wrenching result is impossible to shake.