The Exiles Reviews

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Phil Villarreal
Arizona Daily Star
October 15, 2008
Just because a movie was lost and found doesn't mean it's worth your $8.75.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Kam Williams
EURWeb
July 21, 2008
Best if approached as a nostalgic curiosity shot a half century ago rather than as a conventional flick offering a satisfying cinematic experience.
Full Review | Original Score: 1/4
Amy Taubin
Artforum
March 16, 2015
The question of who is looking and to what end is barely posed, let alone answered.
Top Critic
Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
July 25, 2008
It is like cracking open a time capsule.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Top Critic
Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post
October 10, 2008
Rife with astonishing black-and-white images of an unknown L.A. and clashing sounds of bars, cinemas and poker games, The Exiles is one of those movies that functions as both artifact and fresh discovery.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Top Critic
Michael Phillips
Chicago Tribune
November 20, 2008
The Exiles ... presents one boozy night in the lives of Homer, Cliff, Tommy and Yvonne, from a convertible joy ride through the Third Street Tunnel, to an early-morning powwow.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Kelly Vance
East Bay Express
May 6, 2010
A sorrowful and beautiful film, the kind you never see from mainstream Tinseltown studios, then or now.
Nora Lee Mandel
Film-Forward.com
December 7, 2008
For its beautiful black-and-white aesthetics, docudrama realism, and, sadly, still fresh portrait of off-reservation Native Americans, an excellent rediscovery
Full Review | Original Score: 9/10
Chris Barsanti
Film Journal International
July 17, 2008
...one of the great under-seen cinema gems of the 1960s.
Nick Schager
Slant Magazine
July 11, 2008
While the mood is spot-on, the dubbed dialogue is so persistently lousy that it besmirches the proceedings' otherwise-entrancing beauty.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Prairie Miller
NewsBlaze
July 8, 2008
Kent MacKenzie's 1961 groundbreaking classic about Native American urban alienation, unfolds like an Edwin Hopper painting in motion as intimate noirish voiceover soliloquies of these three troubled protagonists.
Cole Smithey
ColeSmithey.com
July 12, 2008
Director Brent MacKenzie's black-and-white documentary/narrative genre blender about urbanized Native Americans in 1961 Los Angeles is a cold glass of cinematic water drawn from the same well as Joseph Strick's "The Savage Eye" (1960).
Full Review | Original Score: A
Top Critic
Jonathan Rosenbaum
Chicago Reader
October 10, 2008
Its moving portraiture is refreshingly free of cliches and moralizing platitudes, and the high-contrast black-and-white photography and dense, highly creative sound track are equally impressive.
Jeffrey M. Anderson
Combustible Celluloid
July 31, 2008
The movie has an undeniable emotional punch and its historical place in cinema is undisputable (there's still nothing else quite like it).
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Dennis Schwartz
Ozus' World Movie Reviews
September 23, 2009
It's an essential film that hardly anyone saw upon its release in 1961.
Full Review | Original Score: A
Dan Lybarger
eFilmCritic.com
November 18, 2009
Kent Mackenzie's 1961 movie 'The Exiles' was so revolutionary that even now it seems gutsy.
Full Review | Original Score: 5/5
Top Critic
Dennis Lim
New York Times
July 7, 2008
Despite its compact time frame the film conjures a powerful sensation of purgatory: a night like many others.
Top Critic
Wesley Morris
Boston Globe
October 18, 2008
Kent Mackenzie's magnificent, long-undistributed, unclassifiable first feature, The Exiles, stands as a rare consideration of the inner and outer lives of American Indians in a big American city.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Shawn Levy
Oregonian
December 5, 2008
The amateur actors, many of whom in reality met sad ends on those same streets, are utterly convincing. You have the sense again and again that you've unearthed a time capsule -- a sensation that cinema alone of all the arts can impart.
Full Review | Original Score: B+
Top Critic
V.A. Musetto
New York Post
July 11, 2008
It took nearly 50 years, but an important piece of film history is finally getting its due.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
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