• R, 2 hr. 25 min.
  • Drama
  • Directed By:
    Luc Besson
    In Theaters:
    Apr 13, 2012 Limited
    On DVD:
    Oct 2, 2012
  • Cohen Media Group

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The Lady Reviews

Page 1 of 13
Cynthia S

Super Reviewer

February 19, 2013
Really good biodrama. Before viewing this film, I had little understanding of her background, and even less understanding of the history of Burma over the past fifty years. Really well done. Not the fastest pace ever, but still a very interesting story about a remarkable lady...
Anthony L

Super Reviewer

May 8, 2012
Luc Besson is a great director but this film lacks the passion it deserves. I'm afraid he has done Aung San Suu Kyi a great injustice by making a half-hearted biopic of her life. Unless of coarse it was his intention of making a film about the life of her husband, then he did a pretty good job as David Thewlis's Michael Aris took up most of the film - the camera often hanging on him for embarrassing lengths of time for a credible director. For all the great moments in this film, and there are a few, there are three times as many pointless, ill-conceived and ridiculous ones. I love David Thewlis but Besson does not get his potential out of him, the two actors playing their sons can act for candy and poor Michelle Yeoh isn't given the chance to play, what could have been, the performance of her life. For what little screen time she is given, she does a great job but what Aung San Suu Kyi did for Burma is barely hinted at in this mess of a film.
Carlos M

Super Reviewer

December 10, 2011
Besson proves he is not the proper director for a subject like this, turning a real story into a conventional, underwhelming movie and stretching it forever. Still, Michelle Yeoh does her best to confer an aura of elegance and honor to a character that utters cheap soundbites every time to justify her poorly developed actions.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

March 12, 2014
On the one hand, "The Lady" is a heartfelt biopic about Burmese democracy activist and Nobel Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi(Michelle Yeoh). As such, the movie is framed by three deaths:

It is 1947, and her father, Aung San(Phoe Zaw), one of the founding fathers of Burma, is gunned down in cold blood by army soldiers.

It is 1998 and her husband, Michael Aris(David Thewlis), an Oxford professor, has just been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer. He now has between five months and five years to live which as pointed out, should be enough time to settle his affairs. Except that she is stuck in Burma and if she leaves, she will not be able to return.

It is 1988 and her mother(Marian Yu) has just had a serious stroke in Burma. That causes Aung San Suu Kyi to return to her native country from England, with her family not far behind her, just as democracy protests are kicking into high gear.

On the other hand, while I respect the well-intentioned thoughts of "The Lady," crafting it as a romance and giving equal time to her husband do it little favor, making Aung San Suu Kyi almost a supporting player in her own story.(Therefore, David Thewlis' excellent performance ironically hurts the movie more than it helps.) Not to paraphrase "Man of Steel" anymore than I absolutely have to, but the far reaching and lasting peaceful movement for democracy in Burma is larger than all of these people. For the record, I don't mean to take anything away from the personal struggles of the dedicated Aung San Suu Kyi when I say that. But if one wanted to really give a sense of her isolation under house arrest, then a one woman show would have definitely been the way to go, assuming one cast the right actress.
Chihoe H

Super Reviewer

July 19, 2012
I admit, I have a soft spot for Michelle Yeoh because she is Malaysian, but "The Lady" works because of her portrayal of Aung San Suu Kyi. She manages to convey the poise and strength, and captures every nuanced action and motivational speech prowess of Suu Kyi, amidst a weak adaptation of the true inspiring story of Burma's democratic fighter. "The Lady" extends a little too long but with its cinematography and Yeoh's capabilities, it is worth a watch.
Marcus W

Super Reviewer

September 23, 2013
Focussing on the love story more than the politics was a bad idea.
December 21, 2012
"The Lady" is simply the best political biopic I've seen since "Gandhi". Michelle Yeoh really embodies the spirit of Lady Suu Kyi. As a fellow Southeast Asian, I am happy that the Burmese people are given political voice through this movie.
November 2, 2012
A sloppily made biographical film that is supposed to be about Nobel Peace Prize winning Aung San Suu Kyi (Michelle Yeoh - Crouching Tiger, Sunshine), a political figure placed under house arrest for 15 years in a turbulent phase of Burma's (aka Myanmar) recent history although it lacks any passion with which to do the subject justice. While Yeoh gives a good performance, most of the remaining cast is barely passable including that of her long-suffering husband Michael Aris (David Thewlis - Harry Potter, Seven Years in Tibet). The film feels disjointed and although it spans the 15 years of her house arrest it isn't fluid and is rather choppy (surprising considering the director is Luc Besson). While I believe Aung San Suu Kyi is a remarkable individual of the human race, the film is rather heavy-handed which is unfortunate because this shouldn't feel pretentious. It oftentimes does ... and I don't think this would inspire anybody to seek out her real history and work -- and that is a shame. This film fails because of that.
June 29, 2012
A look at history that I never knew about. It was long and took awhile to get to the point, but it was still interesting and beautiful. I found it hard to believe that Besson was the director for something with this screenplay. I enjoyed watching it on the plane.
May 1, 2012
Luc Besson doing a non-fic histo-political biopic? with the lead-lady's fiance, former Ferrari chief, FIA prez Todt as a producer!?! I came into the cinema trying to eradicate as many stereotypic biases as possible, and emerged, less apathetic, and more sympathetic towards the plight of the unjustly-treated, sociopolitically-suppressed and downtrodden in the nation, region & world. Yeoh & Thewlis turn in a stellar performance. However I found the aspect ratio (& melodrama) of the film a tad stretched.
March 13, 2012
A very conventional, and rather dull, rendering of the life of an icon. The characters, especially Michelle Yeoh, desperately lack of life. Beyond the quality of the movie itself, it is good,if sad, to be reminded of how badly the last elections went and how Aung San Suu Kyi went through the same hopes and crowd-cheering some 24 years ago before she and the country were crushed. May it go better this time.
April 13, 2014
Inspiring if somewhat predictable drama of one of our modern day heroines. It's got romance, violence, politics, family dilemmas, beautiful scenery. All it doesn't have is a happy ending, and even if Suu Kyi ultimately prevails, it will be ultimately bittersweet because of all that she has sacrificed to get there.
Harlequin68
Harlequin68

Super Reviewer

March 12, 2014
On the one hand, "The Lady" is a heartfelt biopic about Burmese democracy activist and Nobel Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi(Michelle Yeoh). As such, the movie is framed by three deaths:

It is 1947, and her father, Aung San(Phoe Zaw), one of the founding fathers of Burma, is gunned down in cold blood by army soldiers.

It is 1998 and her husband, Michael Aris(David Thewlis), an Oxford professor, has just been diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer. He now has between five months and five years to live which as pointed out, should be enough time to settle his affairs. Except that she is stuck in Burma and if she leaves, she will not be able to return.

It is 1988 and her mother(Marian Yu) has just had a serious stroke in Burma. That causes Aung San Suu Kyi to return to her native country from England, with her family not far behind her, just as democracy protests are kicking into high gear.

On the other hand, while I respect the well-intentioned thoughts of "The Lady," crafting it as a romance and giving equal time to her husband do it little favor, making Aung San Suu Kyi almost a supporting player in her own story.(Therefore, David Thewlis' excellent performance ironically hurts the movie more than it helps.) Not to paraphrase "Man of Steel" anymore than I absolutely have to, but the far reaching and lasting peaceful movement for democracy in Burma is larger than all of these people. For the record, I don't mean to take anything away from the personal struggles of the dedicated Aung San Suu Kyi when I say that. But if one wanted to really give a sense of her isolation under house arrest, then a one woman show would have definitely been the way to go, assuming one cast the right actress.
February 5, 2014
Despite the harsh critic, i like this movie.
December 2, 2011
This hagiography of Myanmar's Nobel Peace Prize-winner, Aung San Suu Kyi, is earnest, civilized and borderline unendurable.
October 9, 2012
An excellent biopic about Aung San Suu Kyi. The only place where the film fails is that it looks only into the personal angle of her life and the political aspect is not fully explored. but a film to watch
October 29, 2013
The tragic story of Burma and Aung San will always be a heart-breaking, on-screen or not. We would wonder how come this kind of tyranny still exists. Now it comes in the siver screen, with Suu Kyi's life story, adding a visual experience to the ongoing calamity that has plagued Burma. Surprising enough, Luc Besson directed this drama. Though I admire Suu Kyi's advocacy and heroism however there's not much to tell from her life that would make the story compelling. It would be better if they made it short and simple. You got to admire Michelle Yeoh's performance as well but even with that, it's not enough to pull up an oscar for this film. However, you can never ignore the story behind it. The saddest part of this drama is, it's all true...
March 13, 2012
Luc Besson may not be the right director to helm a staggering biopic of a living inspiration in the shape of Aung San Suu Kyi, it falters in episodic sequences that failed to capture the inner struggles of her fight for freedom or why the burmese generals ascend to tyranny and madness. Nonetheless, these flaws are ironed out by sincere performances by Michelle Yeoh and supporting actor David Thewlis, in a true story of sacrificing family and country.
July 27, 2013
An inspiring film about an inspiring world figure with an important message for today and all time about the importance of nonviolent protest to change the world for the better. Although not quite the equal of Richard Attenborough's Gandhi (but then few films are), this moving biopic is still fascinating viewing that teaches us to treasure the type of government so many fought for in our past and so many are fighting for now, one that too often we take for granted.
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